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Re: There is no such thing as Technical Success

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  • Bill McMichael
    ... traditional PM ... scope . Agree. Traditional software development defined success based on the triple contraint you described as it was measured at
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 5, 2005
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      --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, David A Barrett
      <dave.barrett@l...> wrote:
      > I think that Scrum blurs the definition of "success". A
      traditional PM
      > definition of success might be, "Completion: On time, on budget, on
      scope".

      Agree. Traditional software development defined success based on the
      triple contraint you described as it was measured at project
      completion.

      An alternative is a balanced scorecard approach. Balanced scorecards
      are often used to guage organizational performance but typically not
      not defined / measured at a project level.

      A project's success would be measured in different perspectives.
      Another key point is that you measure thoughout the project (to make
      the necessary portfolio decisions), and you do not stop measuring at
      the completion of the project. As financial, customer satisfaction,
      and quality measures may not be known till months after the completion
      of the project.

      Here are the typical perspectives using a goal/measure approach.

      1) Shareholder perspective -- (eg. cash flow, quarterly sales, market
      share, ROI)
      2) Customer perspective (eg. on time delivery as defined by the
      customer, customer partnership measures, customer satis.)
      3) Internal business perspective. This involves among other things
      the triple constraint you mentioned (on time, on budget, on scope), as
      well as quality, engineering efficiency metrics)
      4) Innovative and Learning Perspective. Perhaps this is what you are
      referring to as "technical success" (eg. did we improve our
      technological skill/ processes to deliver the next project
      better/faster).

      So, I disagree there is no such thing as technical success. All of
      these perspectives collectively provide project value.

      I think Scrum does a good job in a more strategic view of project
      success by focusing success on business value.

      How we measure project success and how well these measures are aligned
      to overall company strategy is the Enterprise Agile concepts that have
      been discusssed here. A balanced scorecard is a good tool to do this.


      Regards,
      Bill
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