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RE: [scrumdevelopment] Scrum Evolution: What's it all about?

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  • mike.dwyer1@comcast.net
    If it weren t for the passion where would we be. You all may be interested in some interpretations of SOX that I am hearing and how they could impact scrum. 1.
    Message 1 of 15 , Jun 6, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      If it weren't for the passion where would we be.
       
      You all may be interested in some interpretations of SOX that I am hearing and how they could impact scrum.
       
      1.  Detailed tracebility from request to deployment.
      2.  Separate QA/test function.
      3.  "C" level sign off on priorities and releases.
       
      --
      Mike Dwyer

      "I Keep six faithful serving-men
      Who serve me well and true:
      Their names are What and Where and When
      And How and Why and Who." - Kipling
       
      -------------- Original message --------------

      Mike,

       

      No problem, sorry if I sounded defensive.  One of the most interesting things for me,

      is to continue to understand Scrum and put it in context.

       

      We are so used to dissecting things, and to have �specialized functional procedures� for everything,

      for example, �software development�, that when presented with a simple but integrated framework

      to do everything �software development�, �business process redesign�, �continuous software

      development improvement�, etc.; is hard to explain how all of that works together.

       

      But as a community we *do need* to have a more or less standardized message at least

      in answering what Scrum is, or is not.

       

      Scrum as an all-at-once process, takes a whole new meaning when we say Scrum is all of these things:

       

      A project management approach

      A development method, (not a methodology),

      A reengineered organizational structure to solve systemic problems

      A continuous reengineering process

      A strategic tools that accommodates short and long-term planning

      An envisioning tool

      A set of patterns for hyper-productive development/project management/reengineer

      processes, and now after Jeff�s paper,

      A transformation mechanism to compete in the 21st century.

       

      beyond all-at-once requirements, analysis, testing, development, refactoring, integration, etc.

       

      - Mike

       

       


      From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Mike Dwyer
      Sent: Sunday, June 05, 2005 1:35 PM
      To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: RE: [scrumdevelopment] Scrum Evolution: What's it all about?

       

      Yup. I know. Sorry it came out that way but thanks for the bibliography as it pulls together the seminal work you have done.  maybe the rest of us are ready and experienced enough to move forward with it.

       

      I also think that your opinion that scrum, once introduced into an organization, is an irreversible act and that we need to start addressing the ying and the yang of that.

       

      Michael F. Dwyer

       

      Mike.Dwyer1@...

       

       

      -----Original Message-----
      From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Mike Beedle
      Sent: Sunday, June 05, 2005 2:14 PM
      To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: RE: [scrumdevelopment] Scrum Evolution: What's it all about?

       

       

      Mike Dwyer wrote:

      > Also it would be great if Mike Beedle would reiterate that
      > Scrum is NOT a development methodology but a transformation mechanism for
      > organizations that want to compete in the 21st century.

      Mike,

       

      I am tired of ducking the same punch � please throw new punches to me that actually

      hit the body.

       

      I have *never* said Scrum is only a �development methodology�.

       

      In fact, I wrote a BPR pattern language in 1997:

      http://www.bell-labs.com/cgi-user/OrgPatterns/OrgPatterns?BPRPatternLanguage

       

      putting Scrum as a BPR Case Team:

      http://www.bell-labs.com/cgi-user/OrgPatterns/OrgPatterns?CaseTeam

       

      at a business level.  My second application of Scrum in 1997 was to reengineer a new product

      development process (Mutual Funds and Unit Trusts) for a financial company in a business setting.

      (Our first was for software development 1995/1996)

       

      But since then, we have used Scrum for both business and software development,

      including interesting hybrids, as we do now to implement enterprise compliance solutions for

      our clients in financials, healthcare, banking, insurance and government.

       

      I have said through the years that Scrum is *all* of these things:

       

                  A project management approach

                  A development method, (not a methodology),

                  A reengineered organizational structure to solve systemic problems

                  A continuous reengineering process

                  A strategic tools that accommodates short and long-term planning

                  An envisioning tool

                  A set of patterns for hyper-productive development/project management/reengineer

      processes, and now after Jeff�s paper,

                  A transformation mechanism to compete in the 21st century.

       

      What part of any of the above is not clear?  I�ll be glad to explain,

       

      - Mike



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    • mike.dwyer1@comcast.net
      If it weren t for the passion where would we be. You all may be interested in some interpretations of SOX that I am hearing and how they could impact scrum. 1.
      Message 2 of 15 , Jun 6, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        If it weren't for the passion where would we be.
         
        You all may be interested in some interpretations of SOX that I am hearing and how they could impact scrum.
         
        1.  Detailed tracebility from request to deployment.
        2.  Separate QA/test function.
        3.  "C" level sign off on priorities and releases.
         
        --
        Mike Dwyer

        "I Keep six faithful serving-men
        Who serve me well and true:
        Their names are What and Where and When
        And How and Why and Who." - Kipling
         
        -------------- Original message --------------

        Mike,

         

        No problem, sorry if I sounded defensive.  One of the most interesting things for me,

        is to continue to understand Scrum and put it in context.

         

        We are so used to dissecting things, and to have �specialized functional procedures� for everything,

        for example, �software development�, that when presented with a simple but integrated framework

        to do everything �software development�, �business process redesign�, �continuous software

        development improvement�, etc.; is hard to explain how all of that works together.

         

        But as a community we *do need* to have a more or less standardized message at least

        in answering what Scrum is, or is not.

         

        Scrum as an all-at-once process, takes a whole new meaning when we say Scrum is all of these things:

         

        A project management approach

        A development method, (not a methodology),

        A reengineered organizational structure to solve systemic problems

        A continuous reengineering process

        A strategic tools that accommodates short and long-term planning

        An envisioning tool

        A set of patterns for hyper-productive development/project management/reengineer

        processes, and now after Jeff�s paper,

        A transformation mechanism to compete in the 21st century.

         

        beyond all-at-once requirements, analysis, testing, development, refactoring, integration, etc.

         

        - Mike

         

         


        From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Mike Dwyer
        Sent: Sunday, June 05, 2005 1:35 PM
        To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: RE: [scrumdevelopment] Scrum Evolution: What's it all about?

         

        Yup. I know. Sorry it came out that way but thanks for the bibliography as it pulls together the seminal work you have done.  maybe the rest of us are ready and experienced enough to move forward with it.

         

        I also think that your opinion that scrum, once introduced into an organization, is an irreversible act and that we need to start addressing the ying and the yang of that.

         

        Michael F. Dwyer

         

        Mike.Dwyer1@...

         

         

        -----Original Message-----
        From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Mike Beedle
        Sent: Sunday, June 05, 2005 2:14 PM
        To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: RE: [scrumdevelopment] Scrum Evolution: What's it all about?

         

         

        Mike Dwyer wrote:

        > Also it would be great if Mike Beedle would reiterate that
        > Scrum is NOT a development methodology but a transformation mechanism for
        > organizations that want to compete in the 21st century.

        Mike,

         

        I am tired of ducking the same punch � please throw new punches to me that actually

        hit the body.

         

        I have *never* said Scrum is only a �development methodology�.

         

        In fact, I wrote a BPR pattern language in 1997:

        http://www.bell-labs.com/cgi-user/OrgPatterns/OrgPatterns?BPRPatternLanguage

         

        putting Scrum as a BPR Case Team:

        http://www.bell-labs.com/cgi-user/OrgPatterns/OrgPatterns?CaseTeam

         

        at a business level.  My second application of Scrum in 1997 was to reengineer a new product

        development process (Mutual Funds and Unit Trusts) for a financial company in a business setting.

        (Our first was for software development 1995/1996)

         

        But since then, we have used Scrum for both business and software development,

        including interesting hybrids, as we do now to implement enterprise compliance solutions for

        our clients in financials, healthcare, banking, insurance and government.

         

        I have said through the years that Scrum is *all* of these things:

         

                    A project management approach

                    A development method, (not a methodology),

                    A reengineered organizational structure to solve systemic problems

                    A continuous reengineering process

                    A strategic tools that accommodates short and long-term planning

                    An envisioning tool

                    A set of patterns for hyper-productive development/project management/reengineer

        processes, and now after Jeff�s paper,

                    A transformation mechanism to compete in the 21st century.

         

        What part of any of the above is not clear?  I�ll be glad to explain,

         

        - Mike



        To Post a message, send it to:   scrumdevelopment@...
        To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: scrumdevelopment-unsubscribe@...




        To Post a message, send it to:   scrumdevelopment@...
        To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: scrumdevelopment-unsubscribe@...





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      • Mike Beedle
        ... We learn from history. Do you have a point to make or are you are just hoping to pick up fights ? Last time someone used a similar historical reference
        Message 3 of 15 , Jun 7, 2005
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          Mike Dwyer wrote:

          >Ahh it is so good to get the gang back together.  It has been months since

          >anyone has invoked the holocaust or
          Nazism.

           

          We learn from history.  Do you have a point to make or are you are just hoping to “pick up fights”?

           

          Last time someone used a similar historical reference was to remind everyone that when a group

          does something unjust:

           

          like using Scrum for their management practices, but without any references to Scrum,

           

          *the abused have a hard time forgetting that the abusers did something wrong*.

           

          Mike Dwyer wrote:
          > Also it would be great if Mike Beedle would reiterate that

          > Scrum is NOT a development methodology 
          but a transformation mechanism for
          > organizations that want to compete in the
          21st century.

          > Illegitimum non Carborundum!!!!! 
          >
          > I got the nails.  What time do we meet and at Which cathedral?

          Transalated:

           

          illegitimis non carborundum ==  don't let the bastards grind you down.”

           

          Anything you want to explain?  Who are the bastards?  What do you mean by a cathedral?

           

          You have the “nails to do what”?

           

          I am just trying to understand,

          -        Mike

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