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Re: [scrumdevelopment] Who is Responsible for Success?

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  • Laurent Bossavit
    ... Neat ! ... Isn t the team itself one part of the larger system ? With a corresponding share of responsibility - and of influence - in these very
    Message 1 of 18 , Mar 29, 2005
      Diana:

      > Recently I read a paper that posited a different description -
      > "leaderful" teams

      Neat !

      > As someone else pointed out, where it comes a cropper is when the
      > larger system wants to ensure

      Isn't the team itself one part of "the larger system" ? With a
      corresponding share of responsibility - and of influence - in these
      very behaviours ?

      Cheers,

      -[Laurent]-
      Adding manpower to a late project makes it later. -- Fred Brooks
    • Mary Poppendieck
      When a sports team fails to perform, the coach gets fired. I believe that failure is almost always a management problem; success belongs to the team. Perhaps
      Message 2 of 18 , Mar 31, 2005

        When a sports team fails to perform, the coach gets fired.  

         

        I believe that failure is almost always a management problem; success belongs to the team.  

         

        Perhaps this is why I spend little time worrying about who will be the scapegoat if things go wrong – I already know that most failure is caused by the system under which people operate, and systems are the responsibility of management.  

         

        Mary Poppendieck

        Author of:  Lean Software Development

        www.poppendieck.com

        952-934-7998


        From: DianaLarsen [mailto:dlarsen@...]
        Sent: Tuesday, March 29, 2005 11:43 AM
        To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Réf. : Re: [scrumdevelopment] Who is Responsible for Success?


        As someone else pointed out, where it comes a cropper is when the larger system wants to
        ensure there is someone to blame if things go wrong. Who do we fire? Whose pay do we
        dock? Who gets pilloried? So that all the rest of us can pretend we had no role to play in
        what went wrong as we point fingers and melt into the woodwork. As long as our focus is
        on success (and not the avoidance of failure), sharing the responsibility for that success is
        easy. If our focus is on the avoidance of failure, we require a scapegoat.

        Diana

        Diana Larsen
        www.futureworksconsulting.com   503-288-3550

      • todd
        ... It depends on the relative strengths of the groups. In the NBA the players are highly paid with guaranteed contracts so the coach usually gets fired. In
        Message 3 of 18 , Mar 31, 2005
          Mary Poppendieck wrote:

          > When a sports team fails to perform, the coach gets fired.
          >
          It depends on the relative strengths of the groups. In the NBA the
          players are highly paid with guaranteed contracts so the coach usually
          gets fired. In the NFL the players do not have guaranteed contracts. A
          powerful coach in that situation will last a lot longer. Most of
          development is in the later category. Management is usually in the former.

          Another variant is the powerful eccentric owner, like Mark Cuban. In
          that case the owner will do whatever they want because they have all the
          power and money and act pretty much anyway they please.

          Extraordinary skill can buffer many a problem. Who would want Barry
          Bonds on their team if wasn't so great? Nobody.

          > I believe that failure is almost always a management problem; success
          > belongs to the team.
          >
          That's how a good coach acts :-)

          > Perhaps this is why I spend little time worrying about who will be the
          > scapegoat if things go wrong – I already know that most failure is
          > caused by the system under which people operate, and systems are the
          > responsibility of management.
          >
          Very true. Replacing a system is one of the hardest things of all
          without a revolution of some sort. There's no place people can grab on
          to. Today GM reported some bad earning news and the reason given on NPR
          was because the system doesn't work anymore. That's after getting a new
          CEO to fix everything.
        • Jeff Sutherland
          I was struck by the comment on GM. My view of the situation at GM is that Toyota is cleaning their clock. Toyota decided 10 years ago that hybrids were the
          Message 4 of 18 , Mar 31, 2005
            I was struck by the comment on GM. My view of the situation at GM is
            that Toyota is cleaning their clock. Toyota decided 10 years ago that
            hybrids were the future of Toyota and probably the future of the auto
            industry. They used Scrum-like processes to get there.

            If you read Takeuchi and Nonaka's new book, you will find about a 100
            pages on Toyota.

            The GM stock crash is just the opening volley in the transformation of
            the auto industry. Scrum paired with disruptive technology is an
            unstoppable force.

            Jeff Sutherland

            --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, todd <todd@p...> wrote:

            > Very true. Replacing a system is one of the hardest things of all
            > without a revolution of some sort. There's no place people can grab on
            > to. Today GM reported some bad earning news and the reason given on NPR
            > was because the system doesn't work anymore. That's after getting a new
            > CEO to fix everything.
          • todd
            ... To show you what I know I thought GM was on the right track. They were completely rethinking the car with their new fuel cell cars. Really good fascinating
            Message 5 of 18 , Mar 31, 2005
              Jeff Sutherland wrote:

              >
              > I was struck by the comment on GM. My view of the situation at GM is
              > that Toyota is cleaning their clock. Toyota decided 10 years ago that
              > hybrids were the future of Toyota and probably the future of the auto
              > industry. They used Scrum-like processes to get there.
              >
              To show you what I know I thought GM was on the right track. They were
              completely rethinking the car with their new fuel cell cars. Really good
              fascinating stuff. And the hybrids are winning in the short term at least.
            • Chamberlain, Eric
              Hmmm. All that may be true but Toyota is barely breaking even financially on their hybrids. Their biggest advantage there is in the P.R. value. My
              Message 6 of 18 , Apr 1, 2005
                Hmmm. All that may be true but Toyota is barely breaking even financially on their hybrids. Their biggest advantage there is in the P.R. value. My information is that the real reason is that the Toyota's US plants have a younger workforce which places lighter pension loads on the company than the older US-domestic manufacturers.

                I am all for Scrum success stories but the Toyota/GM battle involves other, much larger forces than the use/non-use of Scrum.

                == Eric ==

                -----Original Message-----
                From: Jeff Sutherland [mailto:jeff.sutherland@...]
                Sent: Thursday, March 31, 2005 8:34 AM
                To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Who is Responsible for Success?



                I was struck by the comment on GM. My view of the situation at GM is that Toyota is cleaning their clock. Toyota decided 10 years ago that hybrids were the future of Toyota and probably the future of the auto industry. They used Scrum-like processes to get there.

                If you read Takeuchi and Nonaka's new book, you will find about a 100 pages on Toyota.

                The GM stock crash is just the opening volley in the transformation of the auto industry. Scrum paired with disruptive technology is an unstoppable force.

                Jeff Sutherland

                --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, todd <todd@p...> wrote:

                > Very true. Replacing a system is one of the hardest things of all
                > without a revolution of some sort. There's no place people can grab on
                > to. Today GM reported some bad earning news and the reason given on
                > NPR was because the system doesn't work anymore. That's after getting
                > a new CEO to fix everything.





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