Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Why do the "values" matter?

Expand Messages
  • Jean Richardson
    All - I ve had my head down in a challenging problem for several months. Now that I m waking up to the world again, I hope to be able to spend more time
    Message 1 of 16 , Sep 20, 2013
    • 0 Attachment

      All –

       

      I’ve had my head down in a challenging problem for several months.  Now that I’m “waking up” to the world again, I hope to be able to spend more time engaged in this list.

       

      I’m thinking of you all this morning because, as I exit this engagement, I’m writing up a couple of organizational impediments at the behest of the sponsor for these last six months of work to improve this Scrum adoption.  I’ve been socializing these impediments to ensure they retain traction in my absence, and one doesn’t seem to be getting the kind of traction I was hoping for.  Essentially, it’s about the lack of the Scrum Values being present on the Teams and in the division as a whole.  I’m getting the response “I just don’t understand what you’re talking about.” 

       

      Do others here see the same confusion about why respect, commitment, courage, openness, and focus are important to an effective Scrum adoption?  Do I need to be talking about professionalism, instead?  I’m concerned that will gloss the issue, frankly.  Have any of you been able to tie this to real numbers (dollars) through external case studies?

       

      --- Jean

       

      gate.site.jpg


      Jean Richardson

      Azure Gate Consulting

      ~ Repatterning the Human Experience of Work

       

      AzureGate.net

      (503) 788-8998

      Jean@...

       

       

       

    • Ron Jeffries
      Hi Jean, ... I am not aware of case studies, though doubtless there are some. Case studies rarely convince anyone, in my experience, even those who ask for
      Message 2 of 16 , Sep 20, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi Jean,

        On Sep 20, 2013, at 8:59 AM, "Jean Richardson" <jean@...> wrote:

        Do others here see the same confusion about why respect, commitment, courage, openness, and focus are important to an effective Scrum adoption?  Do I need to be talking about professionalism, instead?  I’m concerned that will gloss the issue, frankly.  Have any of you been able to tie this to real numbers (dollars) through external case studies?

        I am not aware of case studies, though doubtless there are some. Case studies rarely convince anyone, in my experience, even those who ask for them. Much less those who do not.

        I would be inclined to reason about each of the values and why it's important, e.g.:

        When two people have respect for each other, things go more smoothly. For example, suppose there is low respect between developers and testers. Then when testers find things, the developers will push back instead of leaning in to understand what is being seen. With respect, they work together. The result is fewer defects, found sooner, and fixed sooner. The same is true between, say, the developers and the product owner. When there is low respect …

        Repeat for each, ad infinitum.

        All that said, people's values are not easy to change. Personally, I am more inclined to work on behavior. The things they do, the things they say, and so on. 
        Don't ignore your dreams; don't work too much; say what you think; cultivate friendships; be happy. -- Paul Graham

      • Adam Sroka
        Personally, I always go back to the XP values: courage, communication, feedback, simplicity, and respect. Those resonate with me. Beyond that, I try to make
        Message 3 of 16 , Sep 20, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          Personally, I always go back to the XP values: courage, communication, feedback, simplicity, and respect. Those resonate with me. 

          Beyond that, I try to make sure that the folks I work with can agree to respect the values and principles in the Agile Manifesto. Some people don't really want to. For example, some people like designing things and not necessarily building them. Others like to build things but don't necessarily care what value they have or to whom; it is the act of building things that are cool to them personally that they enjoy. The only solution I have found is to not work with those people. 

          There is nothing wrong with having values that are different than someone else, but there is also nothing wrong with making decisions about who you want to hire or who you want to be hired by based on those values. Since you are moving on anyway, perhaps you should think about what questions you could ask to your next client to make sure that their values are compatible with yours. If they aren't compatible, perhaps no amount of effort on your part is going to change them in any meaningful way. 



          On Fri, Sep 20, 2013 at 8:59 AM, Jean Richardson <jean@...> wrote:
           

          All –

           

          I’ve had my head down in a challenging problem for several months.  Now that I’m “waking up” to the world again, I hope to be able to spend more time engaged in this list.

           

          I’m thinking of you all this morning because, as I exit this engagement, I’m writing up a couple of organizational impediments at the behest of the sponsor for these last six months of work to improve this Scrum adoption.  I’ve been socializing these impediments to ensure they retain traction in my absence, and one doesn’t seem to be getting the kind of traction I was hoping for.  Essentially, it’s about the lack of the Scrum Values being present on the Teams and in the division as a whole.  I’m getting the response “I just don’t understand what you’re talking about.” 

           

          Do others here see the same confusion about why respect, commitment, courage, openness, and focus are important to an effective Scrum adoption?  Do I need to be talking about professionalism, instead?  I’m concerned that will gloss the issue, frankly.  Have any of you been able to tie this to real numbers (dollars) through external case studies?

           

          --- Jean

           

          gate.site.jpg


          Jean Richardson

          Azure Gate Consulting

          ~ Repatterning the Human Experience of Work

           

          AzureGate.net

          (503) 788-8998

          Jean@...

           

           

           


        • Jean Richardson
          Thanks, Ron. I ve been hesitant to point to specific behaviors in this document when I won t be there to speak to it later. However, initially, when the
          Message 4 of 16 , Sep 20, 2013
          • 0 Attachment

            Thanks, Ron.  I’ve been hesitant to point to specific behaviors in this document when I won’t be there to speak to it later.  However, initially, when the internal agile champion asked for me to write two organization impediments up my first comment was “stop the yelling.”  Yelling and disrespectful speech are two behaviors that can still use work.  Lack of respect impairs courage, and pretty soon the whole set of values are on a rocky foundation.

             

            I have started reasoning about each of the values in the document.  A person could write a treatise on this topic, and maybe that’s what I need to do elsewhere.

             

            You’re probably right about case studies.  I’ve definitely seen people read them, discuss them, and then not change a darn thing. 

             

            --- Jean

             

            From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Ron Jeffries
            Sent: Friday, September 20, 2013 6:25 AM
            To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Why do the "values" matter?

             

             

            Hi Jean,

             

            On Sep 20, 2013, at 8:59 AM, "Jean Richardson" <jean@...> wrote:



            Do others here see the same confusion about why respect, commitment, courage, openness, and focus are important to an effective Scrum adoption?  Do I need to be talking about professionalism, instead?  I’m concerned that will gloss the issue, frankly.  Have any of you been able to tie this to real numbers (dollars) through external case studies?

             

            I am not aware of case studies, though doubtless there are some. Case studies rarely convince anyone, in my experience, even those who ask for them. Much less those who do not.

             

            I would be inclined to reason about each of the values and why it's important, e.g.:

             

            When two people have respect for each other, things go more smoothly. For example, suppose there is low respect between developers and testers. Then when testers find things, the developers will push back instead of leaning in to understand what is being seen. With respect, they work together. The result is fewer defects, found sooner, and fixed sooner. The same is true between, say, the developers and the product owner. When there is low respect …

             

            Repeat for each, ad infinitum.

             

            All that said, people's values are not easy to change. Personally, I am more inclined to work on behavior. The things they do, the things they say, and so on. 

            Don't ignore your dreams; don't work too much; say what you think; cultivate friendships; be happy. -- Paul Graham

             

          • Jean Richardson
            Adam – Focusing on the Manifesto is a good technique as it gets you to those values. (Thank you for the reminder.) It’s a less direct route, and perhaps
            Message 5 of 16 , Sep 20, 2013
            • 0 Attachment

              Adam –

               

              Focusing on the Manifesto is a good technique as it gets you to those values.  (Thank you for the reminder.)  It’s a less direct route, and perhaps I’m just getting a bit tired and wanting to be more direct.  And, yes, some people really don’t want to think about their work more holistically and the whole on-the-bus/off-the-bus thing is worth looking at and planning the organization around.

               

              I remain willing to work with people whose values are skewed from mine.  It’s good for both me and them and causes growth.  I’m not sure avoiding situations where agile adoptions have run aground for any variety of reasons—including a less than generative way of valuing human beings—is quite where I want to be, yet.  I know plenty of people who are there, though, and to my mind, this means there are more teams out there in need of support than are going to get it.   One view speaks to courage, and some would say the other view speaks to wisdom.

               

              Someone asked me a really hard question in Q1 of this year (and it was in an interview):  “Do you really enjoy going into these situations where people aren’t getting along, projects are failing, and turning the situation around?”  They wanted a “yes” or “no” answer, and I just didn’t have it for them.  Overnight I realized that firemen likely don’t enjoy running into burning buildings; they enjoy putting fires out.  Arsonists enjoy burning buildings.

               

              Maybe what I need here is a bigger hose or a more reliable water supply.  I’m off to yet another week long workshop next week to get a sharper bit and drill a deeper well.

               

              --- Jean

               

              From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Adam Sroka
              Sent: Friday, September 20, 2013 6:43 AM
              To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Why do the "values" matter?

               

               

              Personally, I always go back to the XP values: courage, communication, feedback, simplicity, and respect. Those resonate with me. 

               

              Beyond that, I try to make sure that the folks I work with can agree to respect the values and principles in the Agile Manifesto. Some people don't really want to. For example, some people like designing things and not necessarily building them. Others like to build things but don't necessarily care what value they have or to whom; it is the act of building things that are cool to them personally that they enjoy. The only solution I have found is to not work with those people. 

               

              There is nothing wrong with having values that are different than someone else, but there is also nothing wrong with making decisions about who you want to hire or who you want to be hired by based on those values. Since you are moving on anyway, perhaps you should think about what questions you could ask to your next client to make sure that their values are compatible with yours. If they aren't compatible, perhaps no amount of effort on your part is going to change them in any meaningful way. 

               

               

              On Fri, Sep 20, 2013 at 8:59 AM, Jean Richardson <jean@...> wrote:

               

              All –

               

              I’ve had my head down in a challenging problem for several months.  Now that I’m “waking up” to the world again, I hope to be able to spend more time engaged in this list.

               

              I’m thinking of you all this morning because, as I exit this engagement, I’m writing up a couple of organizational impediments at the behest of the sponsor for these last six months of work to improve this Scrum adoption.  I’ve been socializing these impediments to ensure they retain traction in my absence, and one doesn’t seem to be getting the kind of traction I was hoping for.  Essentially, it’s about the lack of the Scrum Values being present on the Teams and in the division as a whole.  I’m getting the response “I just don’t understand what you’re talking about.” 

               

              Do others here see the same confusion about why respect, commitment, courage, openness, and focus are important to an effective Scrum adoption?  Do I need to be talking about professionalism, instead?  I’m concerned that will gloss the issue, frankly.  Have any of you been able to tie this to real numbers (dollars) through external case studies?

               

              --- Jean

               

              gate.site.jpg


              Jean Richardson

              Azure Gate Consulting

              ~ Repatterning the Human Experience of Work

               

              AzureGate.net

              (503) 788-8998

              Jean@...

               

               

               

               

            • steveropa
              Ok, two things really stand out to me on this. One, the firefighter metaphor is fantastic, and I would like permission to steal it... The other is the
              Message 6 of 16 , Sep 20, 2013
              • 0 Attachment
                Ok, two things really stand out to me on this.  One, the firefighter metaphor is fantastic, and I would like permission to steal it...
                 
                The other is the question of values in general.  Can we really teach values to adults?  I am leaning toward Adam’s view that you need to know that the potential partners/clients will at least be inclined to respect those values going in, even if they don’t currently practice them. 
                 
                Steve
                 
                 
                From: Jean Richardson
                Sent: ‎Friday‎, ‎September‎ ‎20‎, ‎2013 ‎9‎:‎01‎ ‎AM
                To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                 
                 

                Adam –

                 

                Focusing on the Manifesto is a good technique as it gets you to those values.  (Thank you for the reminder.)  It’s a less direct route, and perhaps I’m just getting a bit tired and wanting to be more direct.  And, yes, some people really don’t want to think about their work more holistically and the whole on-the-bus/off-the-bus thing is worth looking at and planning the organization around.

                 

                I remain willing to work with people whose values are skewed from mine.  It’s good for both me and them and causes growth.  I’m not sure avoiding situations where agile adoptions have run aground for any variety of reasons—including a less than generative way of valuing human beings—is quite where I want to be, yet.  I know plenty of people who are there, though, and to my mind, this means there are more teams out there in need of support than are going to get it.   One view speaks to courage, and some would say the other view speaks to wisdom.

                 

                Someone asked me a really hard question in Q1 of this year (and it was in an interview):  “Do you really enjoy going into these situations where people aren’t getting along, projects are failing, and turning the situation around?”  They wanted a “yes” or “no” answer, and I just didn’t have it for them.  Overnight I realized that firemen likely don’t enjoy running into burning buildings; they enjoy putting fires out.  Arsonists enjoy burning buildings.

                 

                Maybe what I need here is a bigger hose or a more reliable water supply.  I’m off to yet another week long workshop next week to get a sharper bit and drill a deeper well.

                 

                --- Jean

                 

                From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Adam Sroka
                Sent: Friday, September 20, 2013 6:43 AM
                To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Why do the "values" matter?

                 

                 

                Personally, I always go back to the XP values: courage, communication, feedback, simplicity, and respect. Those resonate with me. 

                 

                Beyond that, I try to make sure that the folks I work with can agree to respect the values and principles in the Agile Manifesto. Some people don't really want to. For example, some people like designing things and not necessarily building them. Others like to build things but don't necessarily care what value they have or to whom; it is the act of building things that are cool to them personally that they enjoy. The only solution I have found is to not work with those people. 

                 

                There is nothing wrong with having values that are different than someone else, but there is also nothing wrong with making decisions about who you want to hire or who you want to be hired by based on those values. Since you are moving on anyway, perhaps you should think about what questions you could ask to your next client to make sure that their values are compatible with yours. If they aren't compatible, perhaps no amount of effort on your part is going to change them in any meaningful way. 

                 

                 

                On Fri, Sep 20, 2013 at 8:59 AM, Jean Richardson <jean@...> wrote:

                 

                All –

                 

                I’ve had my head down in a challenging problem for several months.  Now that I’m “waking up” to the world again, I hope to be able to spend more time engaged in this list.

                 

                I’m thinking of you all this morning because, as I exit this engagement, I’m writing up a couple of organizational impediments at the behest of the sponsor for these last six months of work to improve this Scrum adoption.  I’ve been socializing these impediments to ensure they retain traction in my absence, and one doesn’t seem to be getting the kind of traction I was hoping for.  Essentially, it’s about the lack of the Scrum Values being present on the Teams and in the division as a whole.  I’m getting the response “I just don’t understand what you’re talking about.” 

                 

                Do others here see the same confusion about why respect, commitment, courage, openness, and focus are important to an effective Scrum adoption?  Do I need to be talking about professionalism, instead?  I’m concerned that will gloss the issue, frankly.  Have any of you been able to tie this to real numbers (dollars) through external case studies?

                 

                --- Jean

                 

                gate.site.jpg


                Jean Richardson

                Azure Gate Consulting

                ~ Repatterning the Human Experience of Work

                 

                AzureGate.net

                (503) 788-8998

                Jean@...

                 

                 

                 

                 

                 

              • Adam Sroka
                I believe organizational change is possible, but it requires commitment and sacrifice both from the top and from the level where the work is done. One of those
                Message 7 of 16 , Sep 20, 2013
                • 0 Attachment
                  I believe organizational change is possible, but it requires commitment and sacrifice both from the top and from the level where the work is done. One of those sacrifices is being willing to squeeze out the folks whose values don't align by choice. 

                  While I admire your desire to fight fires consider that it might not be possible to change some organizations, and consider what failure might mean for your company's brand, for the Agile/Scrum brand you are representing, and for yourself personally. 

                  I'm all for tilting at windmills, but even firefighters have to know when the right thing to do is get everyone out of the building and let it fall down. 



                  On Fri, Sep 20, 2013 at 11:01 AM, Jean Richardson <jean@...> wrote:
                   

                  Adam –

                   

                  Focusing on the Manifesto is a good technique as it gets you to those values.  (Thank you for the reminder.)  It’s a less direct route, and perhaps I’m just getting a bit tired and wanting to be more direct.  And, yes, some people really don’t want to think about their work more holistically and the whole on-the-bus/off-the-bus thing is worth looking at and planning the organization around.

                   

                  I remain willing to work with people whose values are skewed from mine.  It’s good for both me and them and causes growth.  I’m not sure avoiding situations where agile adoptions have run aground for any variety of reasons—including a less than generative way of valuing human beings—is quite where I want to be, yet.  I know plenty of people who are there, though, and to my mind, this means there are more teams out there in need of support than are going to get it.   One view speaks to courage, and some would say the other view speaks to wisdom.

                   

                  Someone asked me a really hard question in Q1 of this year (and it was in an interview):  “Do you really enjoy going into these situations where people aren’t getting along, projects are failing, and turning the situation around?”  They wanted a “yes” or “no” answer, and I just didn’t have it for them.  Overnight I realized that firemen likely don’t enjoy running into burning buildings; they enjoy putting fires out.  Arsonists enjoy burning buildings.

                   

                  Maybe what I need here is a bigger hose or a more reliable water supply.  I’m off to yet another week long workshop next week to get a sharper bit and drill a deeper well.

                   

                  --- Jean

                   

                  From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Adam Sroka
                  Sent: Friday, September 20, 2013 6:43 AM


                  To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Why do the "values" matter?

                   

                   

                  Personally, I always go back to the XP values: courage, communication, feedback, simplicity, and respect. Those resonate with me. 

                   

                  Beyond that, I try to make sure that the folks I work with can agree to respect the values and principles in the Agile Manifesto. Some people don't really want to. For example, some people like designing things and not necessarily building them. Others like to build things but don't necessarily care what value they have or to whom; it is the act of building things that are cool to them personally that they enjoy. The only solution I have found is to not work with those people. 

                   

                  There is nothing wrong with having values that are different than someone else, but there is also nothing wrong with making decisions about who you want to hire or who you want to be hired by based on those values. Since you are moving on anyway, perhaps you should think about what questions you could ask to your next client to make sure that their values are compatible with yours. If they aren't compatible, perhaps no amount of effort on your part is going to change them in any meaningful way. 

                   

                   

                  On Fri, Sep 20, 2013 at 8:59 AM, Jean Richardson <jean@...> wrote:

                   

                  All –

                   

                  I’ve had my head down in a challenging problem for several months.  Now that I’m “waking up” to the world again, I hope to be able to spend more time engaged in this list.

                   

                  I’m thinking of you all this morning because, as I exit this engagement, I’m writing up a couple of organizational impediments at the behest of the sponsor for these last six months of work to improve this Scrum adoption.  I’ve been socializing these impediments to ensure they retain traction in my absence, and one doesn’t seem to be getting the kind of traction I was hoping for.  Essentially, it’s about the lack of the Scrum Values being present on the Teams and in the division as a whole.  I’m getting the response “I just don’t understand what you’re talking about.” 

                   

                  Do others here see the same confusion about why respect, commitment, courage, openness, and focus are important to an effective Scrum adoption?  Do I need to be talking about professionalism, instead?  I’m concerned that will gloss the issue, frankly.  Have any of you been able to tie this to real numbers (dollars) through external case studies?

                   

                  --- Jean

                   

                  gate.site.jpg


                  Jean Richardson

                  Azure Gate Consulting

                  ~ Repatterning the Human Experience of Work

                   

                  AzureGate.net

                  (503) 788-8998

                  Jean@...

                   

                   

                   

                   


                • Ken 'classmaker' Ritchie
                  Wow, Jean! Great to see you here again. Thanks for sharing your challenge openly. So, when I saw this... ... that made me wonder... What ever happened to
                  Message 8 of 16 , Sep 20, 2013
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Wow, Jean! Great to see you here again. Thanks for sharing your challenge openly.

                    So, when I saw this...
                    "Yelling and disrespectful speech are two behaviors that can still use work."
                    that made me wonder...

                    What ever happened to "civility" and kindness and self-discipline? Agile or not, bad behavior is an impediment, indeed! Unjustifiable, regardless of intentShouldn't we regard [chronic] yelling and disrespectful speech as violent and abusive? Not productive in any sustainable way. 

                    I'd be inclined to "go prescriptive" with some tough love, if I were their coach. Other strategies have apparently failed to influence or empower team members to work things out well enough to heal. 

                    Diagnosis: Collaborative cancer. Organizational gangrene imminent.

                    Coaching Rx:  Top priority for execs now is to lead their organization into healing. Stat!  Set a standard for respect, and honor it. Educate everyone to hold each other accountable to those values. And, if they can't "cure" the offenders, then "excise" them before the infection spreads and kills the rest of the company. 

                    And, yes, that may require courage.

                    Those leaders will also earn the appreciation and trust of those who have persevered or remained hopeful instead of voting with their feet. 

                    Otherwise, without healthy organizational structure for success, agile transformation is unlikely. 
                    ___

                    Jean, I'm pretty sure none of this is news to you. This was my attempt to articulate it, so others in our community can carry the thoughts forward and add value, possibly by reflecting on what strategies have worked (or not) in similar situations.  I'm still learning.

                    Respectfully, 
                    --Ken
                    ;-) 

                    On Sep 20, 2013, at 10:50, "Jean Richardson" <jean@...> wrote:

                     

                    Thanks, Ron.  I’ve been hesitant to point to specific behaviors in this document when I won’t be there to speak to it later.  However, initially, when the internal agile champion asked for me to write two organization impediments up my first comment was “stop the yelling.”  Yelling and disrespectful speech are two behaviors that can still use work.  Lack of respect impairs courage, and pretty soon the whole set of values are on a rocky foundation.

                     

                    I have started reasoning about each of the values in the document.  A person could write a treatise on this topic, and maybe that’s what I need to do elsewhere.

                     

                    You’re probably right about case studies.  I’ve definitely seen people read them, discuss them, and then not change a darn thing. 

                     

                    --- Jean

                     

                    From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Ron Jeffries
                    Sent: Friday, September 20, 2013 6:25 AM
                    To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Why do the "values" matter?

                     

                     

                    Hi Jean,

                     

                    On Sep 20, 2013, at 8:59 AM, "Jean Richardson" <jean@...> wrote:



                    Do others here see the same confusion about why respect, commitment, courage, openness, and focus are important to an effective Scrum adoption?  Do I need to be talking about professionalism, instead?  I’m concerned that will gloss the issue, frankly.  Have any of you been able to tie this to real numbers (dollars) through external case studies?

                     

                    I am not aware of case studies, though doubtless there are some. Case studies rarely convince anyone, in my experience, even those who ask for them. Much less those who do not.

                     

                    I would be inclined to reason about each of the values and why it's important, e.g.:

                     

                    When two people have respect for each other, things go more smoothly. For example, suppose there is low respect between developers and testers. Then when testers find things, the developers will push back instead of leaning in to understand what is being seen. With respect, they work together. The result is fewer defects, found sooner, and fixed sooner. The same is true between, say, the developers and the product owner. When there is low respect …

                     

                    Repeat for each, ad infinitum.

                     

                    All that said, people's values are not easy to change. Personally, I am more inclined to work on behavior. The things they do, the things they say, and so on. 

                    Don't ignore your dreams; don't work too much; say what you think; cultivate friendships; be happy. -- Paul Graham

                     

                  • Christofer Jennings
                    My experience is that changing values is an internal personal thing that takes time. Talking about it directly with people who I feel could benefit from it
                    Message 9 of 16 , Sep 20, 2013
                    • 0 Attachment
                      My experience is that changing values is an internal personal thing that takes time. Talking about it directly with people who I feel could benefit from it often comes out feeling flat. Sometimes it clicks, but I think that's with people who are "already there". Sometimes people seem enthusiastic, like they see the light, but then behavior doesn't change. Sometimes the values I talked about end up being used to reenforce behavior that I feel is anathema. And then there's times (I think like Jean mentioned) where they just don't see the point, the status quo prevails implicitly. But regardless of the short-term reaction there are times when I meet one of these people sometime later and it turns out they've become one of the "already there" group. They've been on their own journey and it took time.

                      So, regardless of what happens next, Jean's acting by her values is wonderful. That's how the seeds get planted. But I doubt writing something about values will help much unless it has team buy-in already, which it doesn't.

                      Maybe you could ask the team to imagine what their team would be like if it were perfect. If you can, get them to actually write it down, individually or better yet as a group. Then ask them to imagine how they would want to be treated by others on such a team (if it didn't already come up). And then challenge them to follow The Golden Rule (i.e., treat others how you want to be treated). They could then turn their vision into a team agreement.

                      Later, you could suggest that their vision aligns with the XP and/or Scrum values.

                      I've had some success with a simple thing like bringing Yellow Cards into the daily scrum. The team decided at a retrospective that people were getting too into the technical weeds during daily scrum. So we made a simple team agreement that anyone could simply raise a yellow card at any time, and if at least 2 others did the same then the person would have to stop. Period. Occasionally at the beginning people got upset. But once they also decided to raise a yellow card it all became clear and easy. Over time it died off and we don't use yellow cards any more. The fun wore off. And people got conformable enough to just say, "we need to get out of the weeds", or whatever. …. It's a simple case, but behavior did change and it was not by talking about values. It was by changing the system so the values could be better expressed.

                      ,chris

                      On Sep 20, 2013, at 8:32 AM, Adam Sroka <adam.sroka@...> wrote:



                      I believe organizational change is possible, but it requires commitment and sacrifice both from the top and from the level where the work is done. One of those sacrifices is being willing to squeeze out the folks whose values don't align by choice. 

                      While I admire your desire to fight fires consider that it might not be possible to change some organizations, and consider what failure might mean for your company's brand, for the Agile/Scrum brand you are representing, and for yourself personally. 

                      I'm all for tilting at windmills, but even firefighters have to know when the right thing to do is get everyone out of the building and let it fall down. 



                      On Fri, Sep 20, 2013 at 11:01 AM, Jean Richardson <jean@...> wrote:
                       

                      Adam –

                       

                      Focusing on the Manifesto is a good technique as it gets you to those values.  (Thank you for the reminder.)  It’s a less direct route, and perhaps I’m just getting a bit tired and wanting to be more direct.  And, yes, some people really don’t want to think about their work more holistically and the whole on-the-bus/off-the-bus thing is worth looking at and planning the organization around.

                       

                      I remain willing to work with people whose values are skewed from mine.  It’s good for both me and them and causes growth.  I’m not sure avoiding situations where agile adoptions have run aground for any variety of reasons—including a less than generative way of valuing human beings—is quite where I want to be, yet.  I know plenty of people who are there, though, and to my mind, this means there are more teams out there in need of support than are going to get it.   One view speaks to courage, and some would say the other view speaks to wisdom.

                       

                      Someone asked me a really hard question in Q1 of this year (and it was in an interview):  “Do you really enjoy going into these situations where people aren’t getting along, projects are failing, and turning the situation around?”  They wanted a “yes” or “no” answer, and I just didn’t have it for them.  Overnight I realized that firemen likely don’t enjoy running into burning buildings; they enjoy putting fires out.  Arsonists enjoy burning buildings.

                       

                      Maybe what I need here is a bigger hose or a more reliable water supply.  I’m off to yet another week long workshop next week to get a sharper bit and drill a deeper well.

                       

                      --- Jean

                       

                      From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Adam Sroka
                      Sent: Friday, September 20, 2013 6:43 AM


                      To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Why do the "values" matter?

                       

                       

                      Personally, I always go back to the XP values: courage, communication, feedback, simplicity, and respect. Those resonate with me. 

                       

                      Beyond that, I try to make sure that the folks I work with can agree to respect the values and principles in the Agile Manifesto. Some people don't really want to. For example, some people like designing things and not necessarily building them. Others like to build things but don't necessarily care what value they have or to whom; it is the act of building things that are cool to them personally that they enjoy. The only solution I have found is to not work with those people. 

                       

                      There is nothing wrong with having values that are different than someone else, but there is also nothing wrong with making decisions about who you want to hire or who you want to be hired by based on those values. Since you are moving on anyway, perhaps you should think about what questions you could ask to your next client to make sure that their values are compatible with yours. If they aren't compatible, perhaps no amount of effort on your part is going to change them in any meaningful way. 

                       

                       

                      On Fri, Sep 20, 2013 at 8:59 AM, Jean Richardson <jean@...> wrote:

                       

                      All –

                       

                      I’ve had my head down in a challenging problem for several months.  Now that I’m “waking up” to the world again, I hope to be able to spend more time engaged in this list.

                       

                      I’m thinking of you all this morning because, as I exit this engagement, I’m writing up a couple of organizational impediments at the behest of the sponsor for these last six months of work to improve this Scrum adoption.  I’ve been socializing these impediments to ensure they retain traction in my absence, and one doesn’t seem to be getting the kind of traction I was hoping for.  Essentially, it’s about the lack of the Scrum Values being present on the Teams and in the division as a whole.  I’m getting the response “I just don’t understand what you’re talking about.” 

                       

                      Do others here see the same confusion about why respect, commitment, courage, openness, and focus are important to an effective Scrum adoption?  Do I need to be talking about professionalism, instead?  I’m concerned that will gloss the issue, frankly.  Have any of you been able to tie this to real numbers (dollars) through external case studies?

                       

                      --- Jean

                       

                      <image001.jpg>


                      Jean Richardson

                      Azure Gate Consulting

                      ~ Repatterning the Human Experience of Work

                       

                      AzureGate.net

                      (503) 788-8998

                      Jean@...

                       

                       

                       

                       






                    • Jeff Anderson
                      Jean, one approach you might want to take is the fact that agile is on self organization for it to work. If you elect to use a method like scrum, it s because
                      Message 10 of 16 , Sep 23, 2013
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Jean,

                        one approach you might want to take is the fact that agile is on self
                        organization for it to work.

                        If you elect to use a method like scrum, it's because you're problem
                        domain is too complex to rely on command and control to get to a
                        successful outcome.

                        now assuming that most of your organization buys into the need for
                        self organization to deal with emerging problems such as those that
                        come up from software delivery, you can then ask the honest question
                        of what behaviors are required to foster this type of self
                        organization. I agree with Ron that focusing on behavior leads to much
                        more tangible outcomes than focusing on values.

                        My experience is that the right behaviors can often lead to better values.

                        Regards
                        Jeff
                        http://agileconsulting.blogspot.com
                        On 9/20/13, Jean Richardson <jean@...> wrote:
                        > All -
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > I've had my head down in a challenging problem for several months. Now
                        > that
                        > I'm "waking up" to the world again, I hope to be able to spend more time
                        > engaged in this list.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > I'm thinking of you all this morning because, as I exit this engagement,
                        > I'm
                        > writing up a couple of organizational impediments at the behest of the
                        > sponsor for these last six months of work to improve this Scrum adoption.
                        > I've been socializing these impediments to ensure they retain traction in
                        > my
                        > absence, and one doesn't seem to be getting the kind of traction I was
                        > hoping for. Essentially, it's about the lack of the Scrum Values being
                        > present on the Teams and in the division as a whole. I'm getting the
                        > response "I just don't understand what you're talking about."
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Do others here see the same confusion about why respect, commitment,
                        > courage, openness, and focus are important to an effective Scrum adoption?
                        > Do I need to be talking about professionalism, instead? I'm concerned that
                        > will gloss the issue, frankly. Have any of you been able to tie this to
                        > real numbers (dollars) through external case studies?
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > --- Jean
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > gate.site.jpg
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Jean Richardson
                        >
                        > Azure Gate Consulting
                        >
                        > ~ Repatterning the Human Experience of Work
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > AzureGate.net
                        >
                        > (503) 788-8998
                        >
                        > Jean@...
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >


                        --
                        Jeff Anderson

                        http://agileconsulting.blogspot.com/
                      • Ron Jeffries
                        Hi Jeff and all, ... I d like to support this. It has always seemed to me that what matters is what people do. If they behave well, good things will happen, to
                        Message 11 of 16 , Sep 24, 2013
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Hi Jeff and all,

                          On Sep 23, 2013, at 9:44 PM, Jeff Anderson <Thomasjeffreyandersontwin@...> wrote:

                          My experience is that the right behaviors can often lead to better values.

                          I'd like to support this. It has always seemed to me that what matters is what people do. If they behave well, good things will happen, to them, and around them. If not, then not.
                          If not now, when? -- Rabbi Hillel

                        • Don Gray
                          Jean, In regards to Ron s comment about changing behaviors and values. The NLP logical levels (also known as the logical levels of change, the logical levels
                          Message 12 of 16 , Sep 24, 2013
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Jean,

                            In regards to Ron's comment about changing behaviors and values.

                            The NLP logical levels (also known as the logical levels of change, the logical levels of thinking and the neurological levels) are very useful for assisting with or understanding change from an individual, social or organization point of view. They were developed by Robert Dilts and are based on the "neurological levels" proposed by anthropologist Gregory Bateson.

                            Level
                            Questions corresponding to logical levels
                            Spirituality/Purpose
                            Who else? For whom? This can be viewed as your connection to a larger system. If you are an individual or company providing NLP related services, what impact are you having within your community, where you live and work, the NLP community, your culture and the culture of others, … ?
                            Identity/Mission
                            Who? Who are you as an individual or company? What role do you play to achieve your purpose? How do you think of yourself as a person/organization – i.e. I am a successful person.
                            Beliefs and Values
                            Why? Why do you do something? What do you believe in or value? As an individual, you may believe you can do anything you choose. Or you may value honesty. From a company perspective, the company may value good customer service and/or the well-being of staff.
                            Capabilities/Strategies
                            How? How do you go about doing things? As an individual or company, what are your capabilities, skills, strategies or action plans?
                            Behaviours
                            What? What are your behaviours?
                            Environment
                            Where? When? With Whom? Where, when and with whom do you display your behaviours? What are the external influences on you?
                            ( this table created by Roger Ellerton Phd, ISP, CMC, Renewal Technologies Inc. www.renewal.ca)

                            The premise states that changes in the higher logical levels (such as Beliefs and Values) create cascading changes in the lower logical levels. If a person values authentic congruent communication, they probably only yell when the building is on fire. 

                            The Agile Manifesto start with values. Yet most implementations I've worked with work from the bottom up. Team rooms - environment. Multiple checkins / day - behavior. Automatic builds/TDD - capabilities and strategies. 

                            Changes in a lower level can affect the next higher level, but don't necessarily have to.

                            Perhaps the way to change values is to work at the identity/mission level.

                            There was a presentation at Agile 2009 titled "Logical Levels and Statistical Games: A Powerful Strategy for Agile Adoption". Unfortunately http://agile2009.agilealliance.org/node/1587/ "download link" 404s. Contact me off list if you'd like a copy.

                            One quick question. What happens in the company that supports and enables yelling?

                            Don Gray - Exploring Human Systems in Action
                            (336)414-4645

                            We don't need better solutions, we need better thinking about problems.
                            attributed to Russell Ackoff





                          • Paul Hudson
                            ... +1. The values of someone are only really visible through their behaviours and only those behaviours make any difference to their work. And I would
                            Message 13 of 16 , Sep 24, 2013
                            • 0 Attachment
                              On 24 September 2013 14:20, Ron Jeffries <ronjeffries@...> wrote:
                              I'd like to support this. It has always seemed to me that what matters is what people do. If they behave well, good things will happen, to them, and around them. If not, then not.


                              +1. The values of someone are only really visible through their behaviours and only those behaviours make any difference to their work. 

                              And I would question whether any employer has the right to seek to change my values. They're part of me. 
                            • Jean Richardson
                              Don! How amusing. Why did you respond to me here where I can only see you on this tiny Blackberry screen when we are here together at this small conference?
                              Message 14 of 16 , Sep 24, 2013
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Don! How amusing. Why did you respond to me here where I can only "see you" on this tiny Blackberry screen when we are here together at this small conference? I'll find you this morning so that we might make arrangements for a much richer conversation face to face in real time. -- Jean
                                Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

                                From: Don Gray <don@...>
                                Sender: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                                Date: Tue, 24 Sep 2013 09:51:18 -0400
                                To: <scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com>
                                ReplyTo: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Why do the "values" matter?

                                 

                                Jean,


                                In regards to Ron's comment about changing behaviors and values.

                                The NLP logical levels (also known as the logical levels of change, the logical levels of thinking and the neurological levels) are very useful for assisting with or understanding change from an individual, social or organization point of view. They were developed by Robert Dilts and are based on the "neurological levels" proposed by anthropologist Gregory Bateson.

                                Level
                                Questions corresponding to logical levels
                                Spirituality/Purpose
                                Who else? For whom? This can be viewed as your connection to a larger system. If you are an individual or company providing NLP related services, what impact are you having within your community, where you live and work, the NLP community, your culture and the culture of others, … ?
                                Identity/Mission
                                Who? Who are you as an individual or company? What role do you play to achieve your purpose? How do you think of yourself as a person/organization – i.e. I am a successful person.
                                Beliefs and Values
                                Why? Why do you do something? What do you believe in or value? As an individual, you may believe you can do anything you choose. Or you may value honesty. From a company perspective, the company may value good customer service and/or the well-being of staff.
                                Capabilities/Strategies
                                How? How do you go about doing things? As an individual or company, what are your capabilities, skills, strategies or action plans?
                                Behaviours
                                What? What are your behaviours?
                                Environment
                                Where? When? With Whom? Where, when and with whom do you display your behaviours? What are the external influences on you?
                                ( this table created by Roger Ellerton Phd, ISP, CMC, Renewal Technologies Inc. www.renewal.ca)

                                The premise states that changes in the higher logical levels (such as Beliefs and Values) create cascading changes in the lower logical levels. If a person values authentic congruent communication, they probably only yell when the building is on fire. 

                                The Agile Manifesto start with values. Yet most implementations I've worked with work from the bottom up. Team rooms - environment. Multiple checkins / day - behavior. Automatic builds/TDD - capabilities and strategies. 

                                Changes in a lower level can affect the next higher level, but don't necessarily have to.

                                Perhaps the way to change values is to work at the identity/mission level.

                                There was a presentation at Agile 2009 titled "Logical Levels and Statistical Games: A Powerful Strategy for Agile Adoption". Unfortunately http://agile2009.agilealliance.org/node/1587/ "download link" 404s. Contact me off list if you'd like a copy.

                                One quick question. What happens in the company that supports and enables yelling?

                                Don Gray - Exploring Human Systems in Action
                                (336)414-4645

                                We don't need better solutions, we need better thinking about problems.
                                attributed to Russell Ackoff





                              • Kevin Callahan
                                Hi Jean, Apologies for commenting on a thread that has otherwise quieted down. I firmly believe that yelling in and of itself, is not a problem...*IF* the team
                                Message 15 of 16 , Sep 24, 2013
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  Hi Jean,

                                  Apologies for commenting on a thread that has otherwise quieted down.

                                  I firmly believe that yelling in and of itself, is not a problem...*IF* the team has built deep trust, and the topic is truly an how to improve the process and NOT focused on interpersonal attacks, and there are team artifacts in place such as a conflict protocol for support. High-performing teams will and should passionately debate in order to discover the best way forward. I'm not suggesting this must always be in the form of raised voices and high emotion, though at times these are bound to emerge. Successful teams and organizations are emotionally connected; members need to be able to vulnerably and transparently share what is true for them. 

                                  That all said, yelling can also be incredibly violent, which it sounds like is more along the lines you're experiencing. Even so, I'm curious about an inquiry-based approach such as "what do we believe we gain by increasing our vocal volume?" or "what is the experience of being yelled at?" or "if yelling is not driving the results we need, what are other possible actions that we could try?"

                                  Additionally, while disrespect can be intentional, what I see far more often is that there is a (at times massive) disconnect between what is intended and what outcome is realized. I find that most often people simply lack the communication tools and language precision to say what they mean in a way that can be heard as intended. These are learnable skills, and without them we'll struggle to get through the pivotal conversations agile requires to a more productive place.

                                  As I've started doing more often, I'd love to connect with anyone interested in further discussion via a Google Hangout or Skype video chat. This is a rich and nuanced topic; email can only stumble around its edges...

                                  -k

                                  On Sep 20, 2013, at 9:50 AM, Jean Richardson wrote:

                                   

                                  Thanks, Ron.  I’ve been hesitant to point to specific behaviors in this document when I won’t be there to speak to it later.  However, initially, when the internal agile champion asked for me to write two organization impediments up my first comment was “stop the yelling.”  Yelling and disrespectful speech are two behaviors that can still use work.  Lack of respect impairs courage, and pretty soon the whole set of values are on a rocky foundation.

                                   

                                  I have started reasoning about each of the values in the document.  A person could write a treatise on this topic, and maybe that’s what I need to do elsewhere.

                                   

                                  You’re probably right about case studies.  I’ve definitely seen people read them, discuss them, and then not change a darn thing. 

                                   

                                  --- Jean

                                   

                                  From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Ron Jeffries
                                  Sent: Friday, September 20, 2013 6:25 AM
                                  To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                                  Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Why do the "values" matter?

                                   

                                   

                                  Hi Jean,

                                   

                                  On Sep 20, 2013, at 8:59 AM, "Jean Richardson" <jean@...> wrote:



                                  Do others here see the same confusion about why respect, commitment, courage, openness, and focus are important to an effective Scrum adoption?  Do I need to be talking about professionalism, instead?  I’m concerned that will gloss the issue, frankly.  Have any of you been able to tie this to real numbers (dollars) through external case studies?

                                   

                                  I am not aware of case studies, though doubtless there are some. Case studies rarely convince anyone, in my experience, even those who ask for them. Much less those who do not.

                                   

                                  I would be inclined to reason about each of the values and why it's important, e.g.:

                                   

                                  When two people have respect for each other, things go more smoothly. For example, suppose there is low respect between developers and testers. Then when testers find things, the developers will push back instead of leaning in to understand what is being seen. With respect, they work together. The result is fewer defects, found sooner, and fixed sooner. The same is true between, say, the developers and the product owner. When there is low respect …

                                   

                                  Repeat for each, ad infinitum.

                                   

                                  All that said, people's values are not easy to change. Personally, I am more inclined to work on behavior. The things they do, the things they say, and so on. 

                                  Don't ignore your dreams; don't work too much; say what you think; cultivate friendships; be happy. -- Paul Graham

                                   



                                  Kevin Callahan
                                  ---------------------------------
                                  Enterprise Agile Coach
                                  LiveWorld

                                  Direct   +1 (207) 691-2997
                                  Skype   kevmocal

                                  Follow Us   Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn

                                • Don Gray
                                  Jean, ... And disconnected! I apologize to the community for posting and then disappearing into the Fire Swamp. ... 1. You posted on a public list. If my
                                  Message 16 of 16 , Oct 1, 2013
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    Jean,

                                    Don! How amusing.

                                    And disconnected! I apologize to the community for posting and then disappearing into the Fire Swamp.

                                    Why did you respond to me here where I can only "see you" on this tiny Blackberry screen when we are here together at this small conference?

                                    1. You posted on a public list. If my contribution has value, I should respond publicly. I might learn something!
                                    2. I did not know your view was a "tiny Blackberry screen". I missed that in your post.

                                    I'll find you this morning so that we might make arrangements for a much richer conversation face to face in real time

                                    We did chat a little at the Change Artistry workshop. Paul Pazderski and I have pondered values and how to better engage them during transformations. I'm still pondering, but that doesn't stop me from trying.

                                    I still look for ways to affect change and remain hopeful that the future will be better and brighter for customers and developers. When I'm no longer hopeful, I need to retire.

                                    Sincerely,

                                    Don Gray - Exploring Human Systems in Action
                                    (336)414-4645

                                    You must be the change you want to see in the world.
                                    Mahatma Gandhi




                                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.