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Re: [scrumdevelopment] New and Improved U ser Story Lifeycle Diagram — Free Creative Co mmons PDF download!

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  • Ron Jeffries
    Hi Charles, ... Why is the last part called Death and Legacy, while talking about acceptance tests, which keep you alive and non-legacy? Seems odd ... Ron
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 24, 2013
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      Hi Charles,

      On Jun 23, 2013, at 11:19 PM, Charles Bradley - Professional Scrum Trainer and Coach <chuck-lists2@...> wrote:

      I'd appreciate any feedback you might have.  (Also, some good User Story links at bottom of blog post)

      Why is the last part called Death and Legacy, while talking about acceptance tests, which keep you alive and non-legacy? Seems odd ...

      Ron Jeffries
      If it is more than you need, it is waste. -- Andy Seidl

    • Cass Dalton
      I agree with the idea that the use of the word death seems a little morbid. And the stories themselves don t really die, the transform from their caterpillar
      Message 2 of 7 , Jun 24, 2013
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        I agree with the idea that the use of the word death seems a little morbid.  And the stories themselves don't really die, the transform from their caterpillar stage as development work to their butterfly stage as useful features.  It feels like they are as dead as the caterpillar.

        I don't agree about the user of the term legacy.  Different context and definition. Or you could say that it is the same definition, just different time scale.  They are 1 week old legacy code vs 5, 10, or 20 year old legacy code.  But maybe the metamorphosis analogy instead of the death analogy would address Ron's resistance towards the term legacy as well.


        On Mon, Jun 24, 2013 at 7:58 AM, Ron Jeffries <ronjeffries@...> wrote:
         

        Hi Charles,


        On Jun 23, 2013, at 11:19 PM, Charles Bradley - Professional Scrum Trainer and Coach <chuck-lists2@...> wrote:

        I'd appreciate any feedback you might have.  (Also, some good User Story links at bottom of blog post)

        Why is the last part called Death and Legacy, while talking about acceptance tests, which keep you alive and non-legacy? Seems odd ...

        Ron Jeffries
        If it is more than you need, it is waste. -- Andy Seidl


      • Charles Bradley - Professional Scrum Trai
        Ron, Point taken, and thank you for pointing that out. It was originally meant to mean the death of the user story as a tangible concept(as opposed to use
        Message 3 of 7 , Jun 24, 2013
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          Ron,

          Point taken, and thank you for pointing that out.

          It was originally meant to mean the "death of the user story" as a tangible concept(as opposed to use cases which were some sort of living document), and then the acceptance tests are the "legacy" of the user story, as in a (generally postive) "human" legacy that outlives the human. 

          Looking at it now, though, I don't like it for the reasons you mentioned.  :-)

          This is one of the reasons I love this list.

          Any ideas on what I should call that last phase?
           
          -------
          Charles Bradley
          Professional Scrum Trainer
          Scrum Coach-in-Chief
          ScrumCrazy.com




          From: Ron Jeffries <ronjeffries@...>
          To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Monday, June 24, 2013 5:58 AM
          Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] New and Improved User Story Lifeycle Diagram — Free Creative Commons PDF download!



          Hi Charles,

          On Jun 23, 2013, at 11:19 PM, Charles Bradley - Professional Scrum Trainer and Coach <chuck-lists2@...> wrote:

          I'd appreciate any feedback you might have.  (Also, some good User Story links at bottom of blog post)

          Why is the last part called Death and Legacy, while talking about acceptance tests, which keep you alive and non-legacy? Seems odd ...

          Ron Jeffries
          If it is more than you need, it is waste. -- Andy Seidl





        • Charles Bradley - Professional Scrum Trai
          Thanks for the feedback Cass, many good points.  As an aside, I enjoy reading your emails. Scrum On!   ... Charles Bradley Professional Scrum Trainer Scrum
          Message 4 of 7 , Jun 24, 2013
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            Thanks for the feedback Cass, many good points.  As an aside, I enjoy reading your emails.

            Scrum On!
             
            -------
            Charles Bradley
            Professional Scrum Trainer
            Scrum Coach-in-Chief
            ScrumCrazy.com




            From: Cass Dalton <cassdalton73@...>
            To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Monday, June 24, 2013 6:53 AM
            Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] New and Improved User Story Lifeycle Diagram — Free Creative Commons PDF download!



            I agree with the idea that the use of the word death seems a little morbid.  And the stories themselves don't really die, the transform from their caterpillar stage as development work to their butterfly stage as useful features.  It feels like they are as dead as the caterpillar.

            I don't agree about the user of the term legacy.  Different context and definition. Or you could say that it is the same definition, just different time scale.  They are 1 week old legacy code vs 5, 10, or 20 year old legacy code.  But maybe the metamorphosis analogy instead of the death analogy would address Ron's resistance towards the term legacy as well.


            On Mon, Jun 24, 2013 at 7:58 AM, Ron Jeffries <ronjeffries@...> wrote:
             
            Hi Charles,

            On Jun 23, 2013, at 11:19 PM, Charles Bradley - Professional Scrum Trainer and Coach <chuck-lists2@...> wrote:

            I'd appreciate any feedback you might have.  (Also, some good User Story links at bottom of blog post)

            Why is the last part called Death and Legacy, while talking about acceptance tests, which keep you alive and non-legacy? Seems odd ...

            Ron Jeffries
            If it is more than you need, it is waste. -- Andy Seidl






          • Ron Jeffries
            Deployment, operation, continuing improvement, … R ... Ron Jeffries www.XProgramming.com Sometimes you just have to stop holding on with both hands, both
            Message 5 of 7 , Jun 24, 2013
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              Deployment, operation, continuing improvement, …
              R
              On Jun 24, 2013, at 4:17 PM, Charles Bradley - Professional Scrum Trainer and Coach <chuck-lists2@...> wrote:

              Any ideas on what I should call that last phase?

              Sometimes you just have to stop holding on with both hands, both feet, and your tail, to get someplace better. 
              Of course you might plummet to the earth and die, but probably not: you were made for this.

            • Alan Dayley
              Useful, value producing, return on investment, productive. Alan ... Useful, value producing, return on investment, productive.  Alan On Monday, June 24, 2013,
              Message 6 of 7 , Jun 24, 2013
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                Useful, value producing, return on investment, productive. 

                Alan

                On Monday, June 24, 2013, Ron Jeffries wrote:
                 

                Deployment, operation, continuing improvement, …

                R
                On Jun 24, 2013, at 4:17 PM, Charles Bradley - Professional Scrum Trainer and Coach <chuck-lists2@...> wrote:

                Any ideas on what I should call that last phase?

                Sometimes you just have to stop holding on with both hands, both feet, and your tail, to get someplace better. 
                Of course you might plummet to the earth and die, but probably not: you were made for this.

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