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What is Scrum?

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  • kschwaber
    I ve been pointed to this group because of the Scrum discussion. I recognize many of my friends here. My comments will be somewhat limited though, perhaps as
    Message 1 of 18 , Apr 12, 2013
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      I've been pointed to this group because of the Scrum discussion. I recognize many of my friends here. My comments will be somewhat limited though, perhaps as limited as my knowledge of the German language.

      Jeff and I are committed to improving the profession of software development, to making software and our jobs better. We formulated, released, and have evangelized Scrum since the beginning to achieve these goals.

      We will be updating Scrum again this summer, and it will have just one home for both of us, "TheScrumGuide.org" . Note "The," as in there only one definition of Scrum.

      We have found a vast amount of work to be done for our profession to do better. We have managers to re-educate into how to be agile, and how to manage most effectively We have organizational cultures to transform. We even have a vast pool of people who call themselves software professionals that don't understand basic concepts, theory, practices and tooling.

      We have a lot of work to do. Scrum is a simple framework to keep that work focused. The more time that is spent quibbling about Scrum, the less time is available for the really important work.

      Best,
      Ken
    • doowopdj104
      http://www.ssw.com.au/ssw/domains-for-sale.aspx Interesting. Did anyone test THE link? TheScrumGuide.org -later -casey
      Message 2 of 18 , Apr 12, 2013
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        http://www.ssw.com.au/ssw/domains-for-sale.aspx

        Interesting. Did anyone 'test' THE link? TheScrumGuide.org

        -later
        -casey

        --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "kschwaber" <ken.schwaber@...> wrote:
        >
        > I've been pointed to this group because of the Scrum discussion. I recognize many of my friends here. My comments will be somewhat limited though, perhaps as limited as my knowledge of the German language.
        >
        > Jeff and I are committed to improving the profession of software development, to making software and our jobs better. We formulated, released, and have evangelized Scrum since the beginning to achieve these goals.
        >
        > We will be updating Scrum again this summer, and it will have just one home for both of us, "TheScrumGuide.org" . Note "The," as in there only one definition of Scrum.
        >
        > We have found a vast amount of work to be done for our profession to do better. We have managers to re-educate into how to be agile, and how to manage most effectively We have organizational cultures to transform. We even have a vast pool of people who call themselves software professionals that don't understand basic concepts, theory, practices and tooling.
        >
        > We have a lot of work to do. Scrum is a simple framework to keep that work focused. The more time that is spent quibbling about Scrum, the less time is available for the really important work.
        >
        > Best,
        > Ken
        >
      • Joshua Partogi
        Adam Cogan might have bought the domain for Ken. Adam is one of the many Professional Scrum Trainer with Scrum.org *I am just guessing To:
        Message 3 of 18 , Apr 12, 2013
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          Adam Cogan "might have" bought the domain for Ken. Adam is one of the many Professional Scrum Trainer with Scrum.org *I am just guessing




          To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
          From: doowopdj104@...
          Date: Fri, 12 Apr 2013 21:59:01 +0000
          Subject: [scrumdevelopment] Re: What is Scrum?

           
          http://www.ssw.com.au/ssw/domains-for-sale.aspx

          Interesting. Did anyone 'test' THE link? TheScrumGuide.org

          -later
          -casey

          --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "kschwaber" <ken.schwaber@...> wrote:
          >
          > I've been pointed to this group because of the Scrum discussion. I recognize many of my friends here. My comments will be somewhat limited though, perhaps as limited as my knowledge of the German language.
          >
          > Jeff and I are committed to improving the profession of software development, to making software and our jobs better. We formulated, released, and have evangelized Scrum since the beginning to achieve these goals.
          >
          > We will be updating Scrum again this summer, and it will have just one home for both of us, "TheScrumGuide.org" . Note "The," as in there only one definition of Scrum.
          >
          > We have found a vast amount of work to be done for our profession to do better. We have managers to re-educate into how to be agile, and how to manage most effectively We have organizational cultures to transform. We even have a vast pool of people who call themselves software professionals that don't understand basic concepts, theory, practices and tooling.
          >
          > We have a lot of work to do. Scrum is a simple framework to keep that work focused. The more time that is spent quibbling about Scrum, the less time is available for the really important work.
          >
          > Best,
          > Ken
          >


        • SharpDog
          I am currently working on a team that is trying to do scrum under contract for a government agency. Repeated attempts (and I really do mean repeated) have
          Message 4 of 18 , Apr 12, 2013
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            I am currently working on a team that is trying to do scrum under contract for a government agency.  Repeated attempts (and I really do mean repeated) have been met with total oblivion .. their eyes are open but nothing registers.

            As My contract is ending I just came from a job interview with a major company.  They lamented to me that, while they have established a customer-maintained backlog, their attempts at measuring velocity or influencing the schedule have been unsuccessful.

            Do you have a Scrum ray I can borrow ?

          • Mark Graybill
            Hear! Hear! I think a Scrum handshake is in order - woof! From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
            Message 5 of 18 , Apr 12, 2013
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              Hear! Hear!

               

              I think a Scrum handshake is in order – woof!

               

              From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of kschwaber
              Sent: Friday, April 12, 2013 4:50 PM
              To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [scrumdevelopment] What is Scrum?

               

               

              I've been pointed to this group because of the Scrum discussion. I recognize many of my friends here. My comments will be somewhat limited though, perhaps as limited as my knowledge of the German language.

              Jeff and I are committed to improving the profession of software development, to making software and our jobs better. We formulated, released, and have evangelized Scrum since the beginning to achieve these goals.

              We will be updating Scrum again this summer, and it will have just one home for both of us, "TheScrumGuide.org" . Note "The," as in there only one definition of Scrum.

              We have found a vast amount of work to be done for our profession to do better. We have managers to re-educate into how to be agile, and how to manage most effectively We have organizational cultures to transform. We even have a vast pool of people who call themselves software professionals that don't understand basic concepts, theory, practices and tooling.

              We have a lot of work to do. Scrum is a simple framework to keep that work focused. The more time that is spent quibbling about Scrum, the less time is available for the really important work.

              Best,
              Ken

            • Mark Graybill
              The timeframe is this summer. From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of doowopdj104 Sent: Friday, April 12,
              Message 6 of 18 , Apr 12, 2013
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                The timeframe is this summer…

                 

                From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of doowopdj104
                Sent: Friday, April 12, 2013 4:59 PM
                To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [scrumdevelopment] Re: What is Scrum?

                 

                 

                http://www.ssw.com.au/ssw/domains-for-sale.aspx

                Interesting. Did anyone 'test' THE link? TheScrumGuide.org

                -later
                -casey

                --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "kschwaber" <ken.schwaber@...> wrote:
                >
                > I've been pointed to this group because of the Scrum discussion. I recognize many of my friends here. My comments will be somewhat limited though, perhaps as limited as my knowledge of the German language.
                >
                > Jeff and I are committed to improving the profession of software development, to making software and our jobs better. We formulated, released, and have evangelized Scrum since the beginning to achieve these goals.
                >
                > We will be updating Scrum again this summer, and it will have just one home for both of us, "TheScrumGuide.org" . Note "The," as in there only one definition of Scrum.
                >
                > We have found a vast amount of work to be done for our profession to do better. We have managers to re-educate into how to be agile, and how to manage most effectively We have organizational cultures to transform. We even have a vast pool of people who call themselves software professionals that don't understand basic concepts, theory, practices and tooling.
                >
                > We have a lot of work to do. Scrum is a simple framework to keep that work focused. The more time that is spent quibbling about Scrum, the less time is available for the really important work.
                >
                > Best,
                > Ken
                >

              • Adam Sroka
                The problem is that Scrum is not Agile per se. That is, while you can do software development in a way that is consistant with Agile values and principles
                Message 7 of 18 , Apr 12, 2013
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                  The problem is that Scrum is not Agile per se. That is, while you can do software development in a way that is consistant with Agile values and principles while doing Scrum, the framework itself lacks guidance on things that are essential to building working software in close collaboration with customers.

                  People come here looking for answers to those questions, precisely because the literature about Scrum lacks specific or consistent guidance about them. However, too often they get told "that's not Scrum," which is not only unhelpful but actually obstructive to their learning.

                  We need to find a way to reconcile the philosophical argument about what is and isn't Scrum with the need for actual practitioners to discuss how to make it work in a variety of contexts. I feel a little dirty sometimes when I feel like I have to justify why something "isn't Scrum" when that is usually not the point at all.

                  On Apr 12, 2013 2:50 PM, "kschwaber" <ken.schwaber@...> wrote:
                   

                  I've been pointed to this group because of the Scrum discussion. I recognize many of my friends here. My comments will be somewhat limited though, perhaps as limited as my knowledge of the German language.

                  Jeff and I are committed to improving the profession of software development, to making software and our jobs better. We formulated, released, and have evangelized Scrum since the beginning to achieve these goals.

                  We will be updating Scrum again this summer, and it will have just one home for both of us, "TheScrumGuide.org" . Note "The," as in there only one definition of Scrum.

                  We have found a vast amount of work to be done for our profession to do better. We have managers to re-educate into how to be agile, and how to manage most effectively We have organizational cultures to transform. We even have a vast pool of people who call themselves software professionals that don't understand basic concepts, theory, practices and tooling.

                  We have a lot of work to do. Scrum is a simple framework to keep that work focused. The more time that is spent quibbling about Scrum, the less time is available for the really important work.

                  Best,
                  Ken

                • Doug
                  Ken: Any chance you and Jeff can start addressing the handshake/interface from the lower level scrum cycle into the larger issue of portfolio / program
                  Message 8 of 18 , Apr 12, 2013
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                    Ken:

                    Any chance you and Jeff can start addressing the "handshake/interface" from the "lower level" scrum cycle into the larger issue of portfolio / program management and business governance, and as well as very-large (including distributed) scaling of Scrum? I.e., Perhaps, e.g., the "Scrum Answer" to Leffingwell's Scaled Agile Framework, which does make - I think - a good attempt to address some of these issues?

                    --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "kschwaber" <ken.schwaber@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I've been pointed to this group because of the Scrum discussion. I recognize many of my friends here. My comments will be somewhat limited though, perhaps as limited as my knowledge of the German language.
                    >
                    > Jeff and I are committed to improving the profession of software development, to making software and our jobs better. We formulated, released, and have evangelized Scrum since the beginning to achieve these goals.
                    >
                    > We will be updating Scrum again this summer, and it will have just one home for both of us, "TheScrumGuide.org" . Note "The," as in there only one definition of Scrum.
                    >
                    > We have found a vast amount of work to be done for our profession to do better. We have managers to re-educate into how to be agile, and how to manage most effectively We have organizational cultures to transform. We even have a vast pool of people who call themselves software professionals that don't understand basic concepts, theory, practices and tooling.
                    >
                    > We have a lot of work to do. Scrum is a simple framework to keep that work focused. The more time that is spent quibbling about Scrum, the less time is available for the really important work.
                    >
                    > Best,
                    > Ken
                    >
                  • Adam Sroka
                    See, that s what I m talking about. The discussion about whether or how to scale isn t Scrum but that s also probably the least interesting thing about it.
                    Message 9 of 18 , Apr 12, 2013
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                      See, that's what I'm talking about. The discussion about whether or how to scale "isn't Scrum" but that's also probably the least interesting thing about it. Keeping the framework agnostic about it is probably a good thing, because there are a lot of us who have experienced it and can tell you diffferent things that worked or didn't in a variety of contexts. However, that makes the question of where to start with Scrum really difficult for people trying to get out of a sticky situation in an existing enterprise. 

                      My personal opinion, which I have shared here before, is that how we scale Scrum (or Agile) to larger teams is the wrong question. If you pop the why stack a bit you might ask a different question like: how do we increase our company's valuation in order to attract more investment *without* trying to make hundreds of people work on the same code base? because that's a demonstrably bad idea. 


                      On Fri, Apr 12, 2013 at 5:11 PM, Doug <dshelton94501@...> wrote:
                       

                      Ken:

                      Any chance you and Jeff can start addressing the "handshake/interface" from the "lower level" scrum cycle into the larger issue of portfolio / program management and business governance, and as well as very-large (including distributed) scaling of Scrum? I.e., Perhaps, e.g., the "Scrum Answer" to Leffingwell's Scaled Agile Framework, which does make - I think - a good attempt to address some of these issues?


                      --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "kschwaber" <ken.schwaber@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > I've been pointed to this group because of the Scrum discussion. I recognize many of my friends here. My comments will be somewhat limited though, perhaps as limited as my knowledge of the German language.
                      >
                      > Jeff and I are committed to improving the profession of software development, to making software and our jobs better. We formulated, released, and have evangelized Scrum since the beginning to achieve these goals.
                      >
                      > We will be updating Scrum again this summer, and it will have just one home for both of us, "TheScrumGuide.org" . Note "The," as in there only one definition of Scrum.
                      >
                      > We have found a vast amount of work to be done for our profession to do better. We have managers to re-educate into how to be agile, and how to manage most effectively We have organizational cultures to transform. We even have a vast pool of people who call themselves software professionals that don't understand basic concepts, theory, practices and tooling.
                      >
                      > We have a lot of work to do. Scrum is a simple framework to keep that work focused. The more time that is spent quibbling about Scrum, the less time is available for the really important work.
                      >
                      > Best,
                      > Ken
                      >


                    • Mark Graybill
                      What I have found fascinating since I come across Agile 10 years ago after over 20 years in the field is the philosophical whirlwind and debates that ensued
                      Message 10 of 18 , Apr 12, 2013
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                        What I have found fascinating since I come across “Agile” 10 years ago after over 20 years in the field is the philosophical whirlwind  and debates that ensued since. 

                         

                        Like many of you I came from the “hard sciences”, so I had to turn a hard eye toward the soft sciences to really understand this thing we call “Agile”.  After all, at some point there *is* a real science behind the best way to corporately develop software, perhaps yet to be learned, and they’re not teaching it in computer science or software engineering curriculums. 

                         

                        We might think the best way is called “Agile” and Scrum the best framework, but we should have reluctance in our confidence unless science reveals why. 

                         

                        I can see Adam’s point about the debates over what is and isn’t Scrum may not be the point at all, but I also argue the same for Agile.

                         

                        If Ken is reading this perhaps he can correct me but it was his Scrum master training that I attended when I heard him say a most profound thing: “We don’t know why Scrum works.”  I was determined to discover why.

                         

                        Throughout our struggle to develop software better, how can we avoid the distraction of such debates?  I mean, sure, when it comes to people there are variables seemingly too numerous to even hope for some degree of determinism.  But that is no excuse for not wanting to know what we do already know about people.

                         

                        Then again, how much of what is written here is as much an exercise of social self-ingratiation as it is a sincere discussion?  (As I eat my own dog food, Scott.)

                         

                        With this verbiage behind us, I ask Adam, so what is the point?

                         

                        From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Adam Sroka
                        Sent: Friday, April 12, 2013 6:56 PM
                        To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] What is Scrum?

                         

                         

                        The problem is that Scrum is not Agile per se. That is, while you can do software development in a way that is consistant with Agile values and principles while doing Scrum, the framework itself lacks guidance on things that are essential to building working software in close collaboration with customers.

                        People come here looking for answers to those questions, precisely because the literature about Scrum lacks specific or consistent guidance about them. However, too often they get told "that's not Scrum," which is not only unhelpful but actually obstructive to their learning.

                        We need to find a way to reconcile the philosophical argument about what is and isn't Scrum with the need for actual practitioners to discuss how to make it work in a variety of contexts. I feel a little dirty sometimes when I feel like I have to justify why something "isn't Scrum" when that is usually not the point at all.

                        On Apr 12, 2013 2:50 PM, "kschwaber" <ken.schwaber@...> wrote:

                         

                        I've been pointed to this group because of the Scrum discussion. I recognize many of my friends here. My comments will be somewhat limited though, perhaps as limited as my knowledge of the German language.

                        Jeff and I are committed to improving the profession of software development, to making software and our jobs better. We formulated, released, and have evangelized Scrum since the beginning to achieve these goals.

                        We will be updating Scrum again this summer, and it will have just one home for both of us, "TheScrumGuide.org" . Note "The," as in there only one definition of Scrum.

                        We have found a vast amount of work to be done for our profession to do better. We have managers to re-educate into how to be agile, and how to manage most effectively We have organizational cultures to transform. We even have a vast pool of people who call themselves software professionals that don't understand basic concepts, theory, practices and tooling.

                        We have a lot of work to do. Scrum is a simple framework to keep that work focused. The more time that is spent quibbling about Scrum, the less time is available for the really important work.

                        Best,
                        Ken

                      • Charles Bradley - Professional Scrum Trai
                        ... In my opinion, the people who complain about the distraction of debates don t fully understand that debate and ritual dissent are some  of the most
                        Message 11 of 18 , Apr 13, 2013
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                          > Throughout our struggle to develop software better, how can we avoid the distraction of such debates?

                          In my opinion, the people who complain about the "distraction of debates" don't fully understand that debate and "ritual dissent" are some  of the most effective approaches to solving problems in the complex space.  If these debates are had here(ScrumD) and in other "safe" environments, then you essentially have the equivalent of a "safe to fail" probe, yet another key pattern for solving complex problems.

                          I do realize that there are a segment of people who are not emotionally content with debate -- sort of, non confrontational.  There is also a segment maybe too comfortable with confrontation and debate (me?).  Somewhere between the extremes is probably best for complex problem solving.

                          In my opinion, we need to have more debates, not less.  The trick is making them "safe to fail."  For instance, having a debate about Kanban vs. Scrum with a person at your client site, in front of key stakeholders, is probably not "safe to fail."  Having those kind of debates in front of people new to Agile or Scrum, also probably not safe to fail.  Having a friendly debate like we did at AgileDenver recently(Kanban vs. Scrum), is fairly safe to fail, IMO.  (The panel discussion, posted on Youtube, doesn't get terribly interesting debate-wise til the end of part 1, then continues on in part 2)  (I would have rather seen Andersen/Shalloway vs. Sutherland/Schwaber/Cohn)

                          So for me, I wish we had *more* open, public, respectful debates in "quarantined areas"(safe to fail), and had them much more often than we do.  I think we'd find that our velocity in iterating toward the optimum would increase substantially, even if somewhat uncomfortably.
                           
                          -------
                          Charles Bradley
                          Professional Scrum Trainer
                          Scrum Coach-in-Chief
                          ScrumCrazy.com




                          From: Mark Graybill <Mark@...>
                          To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Friday, April 12, 2013 8:16 PM
                          Subject: RE: [scrumdevelopment] What is Scrum?



                          What I have found fascinating since I come across “Agile” 10 years ago after over 20 years in the field is the philosophical whirlwind  and debates that ensued since. 
                           
                          Like many of you I came from the “hard sciences”, so I had to turn a hard eye toward the soft sciences to really understand this thing we call “Agile”.  After all, at some point there *is* a real science behind the best way to corporately develop software, perhaps yet to be learned, and they’re not teaching it in computer science or software engineering curriculums. 
                           
                          We might think the best way is called “Agile” and Scrum the best framework, but we should have reluctance in our confidence unless science reveals why. 
                           
                          I can see Adam’s point about the debates over what is and isn’t Scrum may not be the point at all, but I also argue the same for Agile.
                           
                          If Ken is reading this perhaps he can correct me but it was his Scrum master training that I attended when I heard him say a most profound thing: “We don’t know why Scrum works.”  I was determined to discover why.
                           
                          Throughout our struggle to develop software better, how can we avoid the distraction of such debates?  I mean, sure, when it comes to people there are variables seemingly too numerous to even hope for some degree of determinism.  But that is no excuse for not wanting to know what we do already know about people.
                           
                          Then again, how much of what is written here is as much an exercise of social self-ingratiation as it is a sincere discussion?  (As I eat my own dog food, Scott.)
                           
                          With this verbiage behind us, I ask Adam, so what is the point?
                          From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Adam Sroka
                          Sent: Friday, April 12, 2013 6:56 PM
                          To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] What is Scrum?
                           
                           
                          The problem is that Scrum is not Agile per se. That is, while you can do software development in a way that is consistant with Agile values and principles while doing Scrum, the framework itself lacks guidance on things that are essential to building working software in close collaboration with customers.
                          People come here looking for answers to those questions, precisely because the literature about Scrum lacks specific or consistent guidance about them. However, too often they get told "that's not Scrum," which is not only unhelpful but actually obstructive to their learning.
                          We need to find a way to reconcile the philosophical argument about what is and isn't Scrum with the need for actual practitioners to discuss how to make it work in a variety of contexts. I feel a little dirty sometimes when I feel like I have to justify why something "isn't Scrum" when that is usually not the point at all.
                          On Apr 12, 2013 2:50 PM, "kschwaber" <ken.schwaber@...> wrote:
                           
                          I've been pointed to this group because of the Scrum discussion. I recognize many of my friends here. My comments will be somewhat limited though, perhaps as limited as my knowledge of the German language.

                          Jeff and I are committed to improving the profession of software development, to making software and our jobs better. We formulated, released, and have evangelized Scrum since the beginning to achieve these goals.

                          We will be updating Scrum again this summer, and it will have just one home for both of us, "TheScrumGuide.org" . Note "The," as in there only one definition of Scrum.

                          We have found a vast amount of work to be done for our profession to do better. We have managers to re-educate into how to be agile, and how to manage most effectively We have organizational cultures to transform. We even have a vast pool of people who call themselves software professionals that don't understand basic concepts, theory, practices and tooling.

                          We have a lot of work to do. Scrum is a simple framework to keep that work focused. The more time that is spent quibbling about Scrum, the less time is available for the really important work.

                          Best,
                          Ken




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