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Re: [scrumdevelopment] Is Scrum Master a Managerial Role?

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  • Charles Bradley - Scrum Coach CSP CSM PSM
    +++++1 to Jesse s answer below. The SM is a manager role, in the sense that the SM manages the organization and team s implementation of Scrum, and has to
    Message 1 of 29 , Nov 20, 2012
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      +++++1 to Jesse's answer below.

      The SM is a manager role, in the sense that the SM manages the organization and team's implementation of Scrum, and has to operate on the managerial level to affect change. 

      The SM is not a manager role in the sense that the SM has control, or HR functions *over* the people on the Scrum team.

      So, the SM is a manager, but one with very little to no authority over people, and a lot of authority over process and impediment removal.

      -------
      Charles Bradley
      http://www.ScrumCrazy.com




      From: Jesse Houwing <jesse.houwing@...>
      To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wednesday, October 24, 2012 5:43 AM
      Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Is Scrum Master a Managerial Role?



      It's even one of the PSM-I certification questions. If I remember correctly, the answer is yes. Since the resolving of impediments requires leverage high enough in the organisation to actually effectuate change. But I guess it all comes down to the definition of manager.

      The scrum master should not need to be a line manager in the organisation or a classic project manager, but he needs to be able to operate on the manager level. It's just a whole lot easier if you're considered one of the club, then when you're an outsider. 

      So to go back to the other threads you started off of this, no need to be a project manager, line manager or other type of existing manager. But the Scrum master must have managerial skills, must be able to operate on that level and must be able to effectuate change.

      A person with that set of skills is often classified as manager in many organisations. Within our organisation anyone who gets a promotion after Senior Consultant gets the title of Manager, regardless of what it is you actually manage. It just says you've proven to be able to operate on that level in a larger organisation.

      Jesse

      On Wed, Oct 24, 2012 at 1:28 PM, Michael Mallete <mrmallete@...> wrote:


      a very interesting topic that started in another thread in linkedin scrum practitioners group:


      which i diverted to it's own thread:


      i say no. it makes it harder to grasp the concept of the role. rather, call it a coaching role.

      what's your take?

      salamat,
      mike mallete







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