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Re: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Selection of a Scrum Tool

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  • Stephen Starkey
    Jira with Greenhopper actually now supports multiple projects on one board via Rapid Boards. Also, the new Scrum support is out of this world awesome. I
    Message 1 of 12 , Sep 6, 2012
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      Jira with Greenhopper actually now supports 
      multiple projects on one board via Rapid Boards.

      Also, the new Scrum support is out of this world
      awesome.  I recommend it wholeheartedly!

      Sent from my iPhone

      On Aug 31, 2012, at 3:56, "digigm" <gmajchrzak@...> wrote:

       

      Based on some experience I had:

      *VersionOne* should have all thing that you need nevertheless I have hard times with its UI that's over-designed. On the other hand it serves well for my company in tracking progress over multiple teams and multiple projects within one product.

      *pirvotaltracker* I love its simplicity and the way it have developed for few year now. I am not sure thou if it matches all your needs. Nevertheless I would recommend it and give it a try.

      *jira+greenhopper* That serves well as long as you don't need tracking of multiple projects withing one product and particular team might work on multiple projects at the same time. That's because there is no way to have items from multiple projects in one iteration. But if this is not a problem (or greenhopper changed its feature overtime) then it is a nice choice.

      Regardless of the tool you use individual teams benefits the most from whiteboards. Team have to be collocated but its worth it. While web tools might serve well for monitoring progress by others a team itself might track changes on white broad and put it them to the web tool. Until we will have giant multi-touch screens at reasonable prices available combining those two approaches might be useful.

      -
      Greg

      --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Kevin Callahan <kcallahan@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi Rupesh,
      >
      > We've got several distributed teams, so having a web-based tool is essential. I wish we had the ability to be in a team room, and use stickies and pens though that's just not an option :/
      >
      > We're a couple months into using Target Process and amazingly enough *love* it.
      >
      > We needed:
      > - card wall
      > - roles
      > - multiple projects
      > - release planning
      > We wanted:
      > - integration of scrum and kanban; we use the latter for the task board and also use TP's Kanban view to see where stories are piling up.
      > - ability to customize the workflow; we can define whatever states we want for stories and tasks, and also the rules for how things move through and even who can move them
      > - clear charts
      > - tagging and reporting
      >
      > We used to use Scrum Ninja, which the devs liked though left POs with almost nothing to plan releases. We gave ScrumWorks Pro a whirl, though its UI is super clunky and again, the POs didn't have the release planning tools they really needed. We looked at Jira with Green Hopper and ran away; I took brief looks at a few others as well with the same reaction.
      >
      > TP for the most part, doesn't get in our way, is incredibly configurable (though without being a configuration nightmare and works pretty well with default settings), has incredible release planning, and also they have great tech support.
      >
      > Hope that helps,
      >
      > -k
      >
      > On Aug 21, 2012, at 9:36 PM, rupesh2182 wrote:
      >
      > > Hi All,
      > >
      > > I was working on identifying a good scrum tool for my organization.
      > > Could anyone share their experience on identifying an appropriate tool.
      > >
      > > Also, it would be great if anyone could share any key parameters/ decision factors that were considered to arrive at a selection.
      > >
      > > Thanks in advance.
      > >
      > > Best regards,
      > > Rupesh.
      > > PS: JIRA greenhopper looked appealing but looking forward to the above mentioned parameters which can help me rank the tool.
      > >
      > >
      >
      > Kevin Callahan, CSP
      > Scrum Master
      > mobile: 207-691-2997
      > AIM: kevmocal
      > email: kcallahan@...
      >

      =
    • limonic316
      I second VersionOne. We have been using it for about 3 years now, and our requirements were very similar to yours. It does have it s shortcomings in the form
      Message 2 of 12 , Sep 6, 2012
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        I second VersionOne. We have been using it for about 3 years now, and our requirements were very similar to yours. It does have it's shortcomings in the form of a cluttered UI - as already mentioned on the thread, but you'll get used to it in time.
        They have decent tutorial videos available :https://vtv.v1host.com/
        Check 'em out.

        Cheers!

        --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Stephen Starkey <firepoet78@...> wrote:
        >
        > Jira with Greenhopper actually now supports
        > multiple projects on one board via Rapid Boards.
        >
        > Also, the new Scrum support is out of this world
        > awesome. I recommend it wholeheartedly!
        >
        > Sent from my iPhone
        >
        > On Aug 31, 2012, at 3:56, "digigm" <gmajchrzak@...> wrote:
        >
        > > Based on some experience I had:
        > >
        > > *VersionOne* should have all thing that you need nevertheless I have hard times with its UI that's over-designed. On the other hand it serves well for my company in tracking progress over multiple teams and multiple projects within one product.
        > >
        > > *pirvotaltracker* I love its simplicity and the way it have developed for few year now. I am not sure thou if it matches all your needs. Nevertheless I would recommend it and give it a try.
        > >
        > > *jira+greenhopper* That serves well as long as you don't need tracking of multiple projects withing one product and particular team might work on multiple projects at the same time. That's because there is no way to have items from multiple projects in one iteration. But if this is not a problem (or greenhopper changed its feature overtime) then it is a nice choice.
        > >
        > > Regardless of the tool you use individual teams benefits the most from whiteboards. Team have to be collocated but its worth it. While web tools might serve well for monitoring progress by others a team itself might track changes on white broad and put it them to the web tool. Until we will have giant multi-touch screens at reasonable prices available combining those two approaches might be useful.
        > >
        > > -
        > > Greg
        > >
        > > --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Kevin Callahan <kcallahan@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > Hi Rupesh,
        > > >
        > > > We've got several distributed teams, so having a web-based tool is essential. I wish we had the ability to be in a team room, and use stickies and pens though that's just not an option :/
        > > >
        > > > We're a couple months into using Target Process and amazingly enough *love* it.
        > > >
        > > > We needed:
        > > > - card wall
        > > > - roles
        > > > - multiple projects
        > > > - release planning
        > > > We wanted:
        > > > - integration of scrum and kanban; we use the latter for the task board and also use TP's Kanban view to see where stories are piling up.
        > > > - ability to customize the workflow; we can define whatever states we want for stories and tasks, and also the rules for how things move through and even who can move them
        > > > - clear charts
        > > > - tagging and reporting
        > > >
        > > > We used to use Scrum Ninja, which the devs liked though left POs with almost nothing to plan releases. We gave ScrumWorks Pro a whirl, though its UI is super clunky and again, the POs didn't have the release planning tools they really needed. We looked at Jira with Green Hopper and ran away; I took brief looks at a few others as well with the same reaction.
        > > >
        > > > TP for the most part, doesn't get in our way, is incredibly configurable (though without being a configuration nightmare and works pretty well with default settings), has incredible release planning, and also they have great tech support.
        > > >
        > > > Hope that helps,
        > > >
        > > > -k
        > > >
        > > > On Aug 21, 2012, at 9:36 PM, rupesh2182 wrote:
        > > >
        > > > > Hi All,
        > > > >
        > > > > I was working on identifying a good scrum tool for my organization.
        > > > > Could anyone share their experience on identifying an appropriate tool.
        > > > >
        > > > > Also, it would be great if anyone could share any key parameters/ decision factors that were considered to arrive at a selection.
        > > > >
        > > > > Thanks in advance.
        > > > >
        > > > > Best regards,
        > > > > Rupesh.
        > > > > PS: JIRA greenhopper looked appealing but looking forward to the above mentioned parameters which can help me rank the tool.
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > >
        > > > Kevin Callahan, CSP
        > > > Scrum Master
        > > > mobile: 207-691-2997
        > > > AIM: kevmocal
        > > > email: kcallahan@
        > > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
      • Charles Bradley - Scrum Coach CSP CSM PSM
        I m also a fan of Greenhopper(+Confluence), and I pretty much hate all other tools in that genre(Agile ALM) that I ve seen, for various reasons.  I m also
        Message 3 of 12 , Sep 7, 2012
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          I'm also a fan of Greenhopper(+Confluence), and I pretty much hate all other tools in that genre(Agile ALM) that I've seen, for various reasons.  I'm also hard to please.  In general.  :-)

          Further, I strongly prefer the low tech methods (sticky notes, etc) over any electronic tool.  The only times I recommend using Agile ALM tools are:
          a) A team that has a lot of "remoteness" in it.
          b) When one or more people will get fired or have their career/job severely punished/threatened for not using such a tool.

          I try my hardest to avoid the ALM tools for Agile teams, but I often don't win. 

          My opinions may very well change some day as the technology and tools advance.
           
          -------
          Charles Bradley
          http://www.ScrumCrazy.com




          From: Stephen Starkey <firepoet78@...>
          To: "scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com" <scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Thursday, September 6, 2012 7:51 AM
          Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Selection of a Scrum Tool



          Jira with Greenhopper actually now supports 
          multiple projects on one board via Rapid Boards.

          Also, the new Scrum support is out of this world
          awesome.  I recommend it wholeheartedly!

          Sent from my iPhone

          On Aug 31, 2012, at 3:56, "digigm" <gmajchrzak@...> wrote:

           
          Based on some experience I had:

          *VersionOne* should have all thing that you need nevertheless I have hard times with its UI that's over-designed. On the other hand it serves well for my company in tracking progress over multiple teams and multiple projects within one product.

          *pirvotaltracker* I love its simplicity and the way it have developed for few year now. I am not sure thou if it matches all your needs. Nevertheless I would recommend it and give it a try.

          *jira+greenhopper* That serves well as long as you don't need tracking of multiple projects withing one product and particular team might work on multiple projects at the same time. That's because there is no way to have items from multiple projects in one iteration. But if this is not a problem (or greenhopper changed its feature overtime) then it is a nice choice.

          Regardless of the tool you use individual teams benefits the most from whiteboards. Team have to be collocated but its worth it. While web tools might serve well for monitoring progress by others a team itself might track changes on white broad and put it them to the web tool. Until we will have giant multi-touch screens at reasonable prices available combining those two approaches might be useful.

          -
          Greg

          --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Kevin Callahan <kcallahan@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi Rupesh,
          >
          > We've got several distributed teams, so having a web-based tool is essential. I wish we had the ability to be in a team room, and use stickies and pens though that's just not an option :/
          >
          > We're a couple months into using Target Process and amazingly enough *love* it.
          >
          > We needed:
          > - card wall
          > - roles
          > - multiple projects
          > - release planning
          > We wanted:
          > - integration of scrum and kanban; we use the latter for the task board and also use TP's Kanban view to see where stories are piling up.
          > - ability to customize the workflow; we can define whatever states we want for stories and tasks, and also the rules for how things move through and even who can move them
          > - clear charts
          > - tagging and reporting
          >
          > We used to use Scrum Ninja, which the devs liked though left POs with almost nothing to plan releases. We gave ScrumWorks Pro a whirl, though its UI is super clunky and again, the POs didn't have the release planning tools they really needed. We looked at Jira with Green Hopper and ran away; I took brief looks at a few others as well with the same reaction.
          >
          > TP for the most part, doesn't get in our way, is incredibly configurable (though without being a configuration nightmare and works pretty well with default settings), has incredible release planning, and also they have great tech support.
          >
          > Hope that helps,
          >
          > -k
          >
          > On Aug 21, 2012, at 9:36 PM, rupesh2182 wrote:
          >
          > > Hi All,
          > >
          > > I was working on identifying a good scrum tool for my organization.
          > > Could anyone share their experience on identifying an appropriate tool.
          > >
          > > Also, it would be great if anyone could share any key parameters/ decision factors that were considered to arrive at a selection.
          > >
          > > Thanks in advance.
          > >
          > > Best regards,
          > > Rupesh.
          > > PS: JIRA greenhopper looked appealing but looking forward to the above mentioned parameters which can help me rank the tool.
          > >
          > >
          >
          > Kevin Callahan, CSP
          > Scrum Master
          > mobile: 207-691-2997
          > AIM: kevmocal
          > email: kcallahan@...
          >



          =


        • Cass Dalton
          I d be interested in hearing more about why you prefer GH over something like VersionOne or Rally. We have an enterprise JIRA license and we bought a 10 user
          Message 4 of 12 , Sep 8, 2012
          • 0 Attachment
            I'd be interested in hearing more about why you prefer GH over something like VersionOne or Rally.  We have an enterprise JIRA license and we bought a 10 user JIRA and a 10 user GH to experiment with.  It feels like GH shows that it is an adapter on top of an issue tracking tool versus the others which were designed from the ground up with Agile in mind.  I haven't really used anything other than GH to track Scrum, but what little I saw of VO seemed like there was a better user experience (tracking hours/points, splitting stories, etc), all seemed like they flowed better in VO.

            On Fri, Sep 7, 2012 at 8:03 PM, Charles Bradley - Scrum Coach CSP CSM PSM I <chuck-lists2@...> wrote:
             

            I'm also a fan of Greenhopper(+Confluence), and I pretty much hate all other tools in that genre(Agile ALM) that I've seen, for various reasons.  I'm also hard to please.  In general.  :-)

            Further, I strongly prefer the low tech methods (sticky notes, etc) over any electronic tool.  The only times I recommend using Agile ALM tools are:
            a) A team that has a lot of "remoteness" in it.
            b) When one or more people will get fired or have their career/job severely punished/threatened for not using such a tool.

            I try my hardest to avoid the ALM tools for Agile teams, but I often don't win. 

            My opinions may very well change some day as the technology and tools advance.
             
            -------
            Charles Bradley
            http://www.ScrumCrazy.com




            From: Stephen Starkey <firepoet78@...>
            To: "scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com" <scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Thursday, September 6, 2012 7:51 AM
            Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Selection of a Scrum Tool



            Jira with Greenhopper actually now supports 
            multiple projects on one board via Rapid Boards.

            Also, the new Scrum support is out of this world
            awesome.  I recommend it wholeheartedly!

            Sent from my iPhone

            On Aug 31, 2012, at 3:56, "digigm" <gmajchrzak@...> wrote:

             
            Based on some experience I had:

            *VersionOne* should have all thing that you need nevertheless I have hard times with its UI that's over-designed. On the other hand it serves well for my company in tracking progress over multiple teams and multiple projects within one product.

            *pirvotaltracker* I love its simplicity and the way it have developed for few year now. I am not sure thou if it matches all your needs. Nevertheless I would recommend it and give it a try.

            *jira+greenhopper* That serves well as long as you don't need tracking of multiple projects withing one product and particular team might work on multiple projects at the same time. That's because there is no way to have items from multiple projects in one iteration. But if this is not a problem (or greenhopper changed its feature overtime) then it is a nice choice.

            Regardless of the tool you use individual teams benefits the most from whiteboards. Team have to be collocated but its worth it. While web tools might serve well for monitoring progress by others a team itself might track changes on white broad and put it them to the web tool. Until we will have giant multi-touch screens at reasonable prices available combining those two approaches might be useful.

            -
            Greg

            --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Kevin Callahan <kcallahan@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi Rupesh,
            >
            > We've got several distributed teams, so having a web-based tool is essential. I wish we had the ability to be in a team room, and use stickies and pens though that's just not an option :/
            >
            > We're a couple months into using Target Process and amazingly enough *love* it.
            >
            > We needed:
            > - card wall
            > - roles
            > - multiple projects
            > - release planning
            > We wanted:
            > - integration of scrum and kanban; we use the latter for the task board and also use TP's Kanban view to see where stories are piling up.
            > - ability to customize the workflow; we can define whatever states we want for stories and tasks, and also the rules for how things move through and even who can move them
            > - clear charts
            > - tagging and reporting
            >
            > We used to use Scrum Ninja, which the devs liked though left POs with almost nothing to plan releases. We gave ScrumWorks Pro a whirl, though its UI is super clunky and again, the POs didn't have the release planning tools they really needed. We looked at Jira with Green Hopper and ran away; I took brief looks at a few others as well with the same reaction.
            >
            > TP for the most part, doesn't get in our way, is incredibly configurable (though without being a configuration nightmare and works pretty well with default settings), has incredible release planning, and also they have great tech support.
            >
            > Hope that helps,
            >
            > -k
            >
            > On Aug 21, 2012, at 9:36 PM, rupesh2182 wrote:
            >
            > > Hi All,
            > >
            > > I was working on identifying a good scrum tool for my organization.
            > > Could anyone share their experience on identifying an appropriate tool.
            > >
            > > Also, it would be great if anyone could share any key parameters/ decision factors that were considered to arrive at a selection.
            > >
            > > Thanks in advance.
            > >
            > > Best regards,
            > > Rupesh.
            > > PS: JIRA greenhopper looked appealing but looking forward to the above mentioned parameters which can help me rank the tool.
            > >
            > >
            >
            > Kevin Callahan, CSP
            > Scrum Master
            > mobile: 207-691-2997
            > AIM: kevmocal
            > email: kcallahan@...
            >



            =



          • jamesjhawkins
            The last selection process that I encounterd ended up with Rally by way of Version One and Agile On Demand. I didn t see the bills but I believe Rally was the
            Message 5 of 12 , Sep 10, 2012
            • 0 Attachment
              The last selection process that I encounterd ended up with Rally by way of Version One and Agile On Demand. I didn't see the bills but I believe Rally was the more expensive option. I also hear that it is endorsed by some of the top Agileratti.

              My impression of the cheaper and free tools is that they generally don't do too much to help user story development. I think I read on one of their sites that they actually expect people to import user stories from Excel or similar.
              Rally, at least, can model the states through which a story makes transition before Sprint Planning. That's important.

              As a general rule for tool selection, I'd say involve the Product Owners and whoever will be writing user stories.

              Cheers, Jim
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