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Re: Scrum Master vs Scrum Coach

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  • jessicacp23
    Has anyone seen this IEEE study from Oslo that shows that Kanban outperform Scrum? http://www.computer.org/csdl/mags/so/preprint/mso2012990160-abs.html Many
    Message 1 of 11 , Aug 10, 2012
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      Has anyone seen this IEEE study from Oslo that shows that Kanban outperform Scrum?

      http://www.computer.org/csdl/mags/so/preprint/mso2012990160-abs.html

      Many claims about the usefulness of various processes or methods, such as Scrum and Kanban, have been stated in agile and lean software communities. However, these claims are rarely supported by objective data or empirical investigations. In contrast, this article aims to demonstrate that the effect of processes or methods (here: Scrum versus Kanban) can be evaluated and compared on the basis of objective data. We analyzed data of more than 12,000 work items collected over the years 2009-2011 in a medium-sized software company. The company used Scrum from 2007 to autumn 2010, at which point they changed to Kanban. By using Kanban instead of Scrum, the company almost halved the lead time, reduced the number of weighted bugs by 10%, improved productivity by 21% for PBIs, and reduced productivity by 11% for bugs. Consequently, Kanban seems to outperform Scrum in this company. However, the results should be interpreted with caution because the use of Kanban succeeded the use of Scrum. To acquire more knowledge about the performance of different agile or lean methods, scholars should conduct similar studies in different organizations in different application domains and with people of different cultures and competences.

      --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Michael Wollin <yahoo@...> wrote:
      >
      > Great answer, Charles! I might add (or assert) that an Agile Coach might also need to be versed in Lean/Kanban, as this is emerging (especially for engineering support teams).
      >
      > I hope I'm not opening a can of worms. :)
      >
      > Michael
      >
      > On Aug 12, 2011, at 11:12 AM, Charles Bradley - Scrum Coach CSM PSM I wrote:
      >
      > > Joshua,
      > >
      > > I'll take a crack at this. There is nothing official about these terms except that Scrum Master is well defined in the Scrum Guide
      > >
      > > Scrum Master - the role as defined in the Scrum Guide.
      > >
      > > A Scrum Master brings value to an organization in these ways:
      > > A good Scrum Master helps the org adopt and progress towards good Scrum in a feasible way.
      > > A good Scrum Master helps the Scrum Team deliver higher quality, higher value software faster, by maximizing the benefits received from Scrum.
      > > Scrum Coach - One who can effectively teach and coach all roles as defined in the Scrum Guide(SM, PO, Dev, org). Ideally, IMO, the Scrum Coach will have actual past experience playing all three of the main roles(or very similar roles) somewhere in their background. Another very important trait of a Scrum Coach is experience coaching in a variety of organizational settings. In this way, the Scrum Coach brings best practices about Scrum adoption to the organization. No certification is required to do this. I could get into the specifics about what I think about the SA Scrum Coach certification (advantages and disadvantages), but there are a lot of Scrum Alliance certified people on this list and I'm not sure I have the time to take them all on at once. Maybe some day. :-) In my ideal world, a Scrum Coach is responsible for taking the Scrum Maturity of one or more Scrum teams to a significantly higher level.
      > >
      > > A Scrum Coach brings value to an organization in these ways:
      > > Utilizing broader experiences and adoption best practices, the Scrum Coach helps the organization and (often multiple) Scrum Teams adopt and progress towards good Scrum in a feasible way.
      > > A Scrum Coach progresses an organization's Scrum Maturity much faster and more efficiently than someone with more limited experiences or someone who is playing solely a Scrum Master role.
      > > Helps (often multiple) Scrum Teams deliver higher quality, higher value software faster, by maximizing the benefits received from Scrum.
      > >
      > > Agile Coach - as others have said, this is a very broad and not well defined term. Sadly, the "Agile" term itself is a broad and vague term to many people in the business, so there is probably very little consensus on what this term(Agile Coach) means. IMO, what it generally means is someone very similar to a Scrum Coach, who is also knowledgeable (and preferably experienced) about other Agile instances such as AgileUP, XP, Crystal, etc. In some cases, it simply means that the coach doesn't want to limit the marketing of themselves to Scrum teams only. In other cases, I think it means that the Coach doesn't like the highly disciplines Agile instances such as Scrum and XP and instead prefers to mix and match Agile-like techniques and roll their own Agile. Personally, I've never heard of or seen this latter form of an Agile Coach be very successful.
      > >
      > > -------
      > > Charles Bradley, CSM, PSM I
      > > Experienced Scrum Coach
      > > Currently Seeking engagement as Scrum Coach or Scrum Master in Denver area
      > > My blog: http://scrumcrazy.wordpress.com/
      >
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