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Re: [scrumdevelopment] Re: [Scrum-India] User stories with a large number of acceptance criteria

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  • Charles Bradley - Scrum Coach CSP CSM PSM
    Ram, Inspired by Pierre s comment, I would also agree that there usually is no such thing as a User Story with 30 acceptance tests.  I think Roman Pichler
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 13, 2012
      Ram,

      Inspired by Pierre's comment, I would also agree that there usually is no such thing as a User Story with 30 acceptance tests. 

      I think Roman Pichler said it best here:
      "As a rule of thumb, I like to employ three to five acceptance criteria per user story."
      http://www.romanpichler.com/blog/product-backlog/the-definition-of-ready/

      Once you've figured out all of your scenarios (probably a specification by example decision table), then you can probably slice the story using small subsets of the scenarios(maybe 3-5 per story).
       
      -------
      Charles Bradley
      http://www.ScrumCrazy.com




      From: Charles Bradley - Scrum Coach CSP CSM PSM I <chuck-lists2@...>
      To: "scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com" <scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Friday, July 13, 2012 12:11 PM
      Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Re: [Scrum-India] User stories with a large number of acceptance criteria



      Ram,

      Sounds like you have some complex logic in your story where the acceptance tests vary by data scenarios.

      For situations like this, I like to use Specification by Example, Flowcharts, State Diagrams, or Given/When/Then(though I might shy away from this pattern if there are numerous scenarios), to represent acceptance tests.  Which pattern you use will probably be indicated by the rest of your acceptance tests and the nature of the logic you are trying to represent.

      A recent presentation that I have been giving, entitled "Story Testing Patterns", has some more info on why you might choose one pattern over the others.  You can see it in pdf form(along with some moderately complicated logic examples like yours) here: 
      http://www.scrumcrazy.com/Presentation+-+Story+Testing+Patterns


      -------
      Charles Bradley
      http://www.ScrumCrazy.com




      From: ShriKant Vashishtha <vashishtha_sk@...>
      To: "Scrum-India@yahoogroups.com" <Scrum-India@yahoogroups.com>; "scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com" <scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com>; "agileprojectmanagement@yahoogroups.com" <agileprojectmanagement@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Friday, July 13, 2012 10:29 AM
      Subject: [scrumdevelopment] Re: [Scrum-India] User stories with a large number of acceptance criteria



      Hi Ram,

      You may want to look at different patterns for breaking user-stories at http://sampreshan.svashishtha.com/2012/05/06/how-to-break-requirements-into-user-stories/

      Kind regards,
      -ShriKant

      http://sampreshan.svashishtha.com
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      From: Ram Srinivasan <vasan.ram@...>
      To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com; Scrum-India@yahoogroups.com; agileprojectmanagement@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Friday, July 13, 2012 12:12 AM
      Subject: [Scrum-India] User stories with a large number of acceptance criteria

       
      I am working with a team where the Product Owner has one story with
      about 30 different acceptance criteria. This story is quite rule based
      and the acceptance criteria looks like

      If A1 is true and B1 is false .... and Z1 is true then Result should
      be _Something_
      If A1 is false and B1 is false .. and Z1 is false then result should
      be _SomethingElse_
      ...

      If A1 is true and B1 is true .. and Z1 is false then result should be
      _SomeOtherThing_

      The user story makes sense only with all the acceptance criteria in
      place, but the effort involved in developing would be huge. How would
      you slice this kind of a story to a smaller manageable meaningful
      story ?

      Thanks,
      Ram










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