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Re: Voluntary overtime

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  • SeanH
    I think I would let the team continue as-is, but I would communicate to the stakeholders that it is likely the team s output is likely to degrade. Explain that
    Message 1 of 12 , May 3, 2012
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      I think I would let the team continue as-is, but I would communicate to the stakeholders that it is likely the team's output is likely to degrade. Explain that there are team members who are voluntarily putting in extra time, and that you don't expect that burst to be sustainable. That way you are preparing the right people for the inevitable drop in velocity that is coming. And if/when that drop does arrive, you have something to reflect upon with the team.


      --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Gary Williams <adtz_the_enchanter@...> wrote:
      >
      > I have a couple of developers on a high performing team that are consistently working overtime (nights, weekends).  I've verified that this self-generated and seems to be based on their interest in cracking the problems involved.  Do I try and discourage this based on the principle of sustainable pace?  My fear is that it will simply drive it underground which doesn't change anything and loses transparency.  The motto from a previous workplace was "you can't control the coding underground" and I think that fits here, but I'm concerned about burnout.  The application in question is new technology and a coding challenge both mathematically and graphically.  The team is producing wonderfully via what they call 'organized chaos' and I don't want to mess with what's working.
      >
      >
      > Any ideas?
      >
      > Gary Williams
      >
    • Gary Williams
      Well, I discussed it with the team in the retro and the reaction was mixed.  The lead dev has not been completely extracted from his previous project and has
      Message 2 of 12 , May 3, 2012
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        Well, I discussed it with the team in the retro and the reaction was mixed.  The lead dev has not been completely extracted from his previous project and has a bunch of crap meetings I don't have an ability to mitigate - so he does his development when he can.  Our other developer did a statistical analysis of his time (44.9 hrs/ wk, rounded to the nearest 10th, with a standard deviation of 4.4) and seems to be listening.  So I think I will continue with gentle reminders on the subject and see how it works out.  I'm afraid we are seriously burning out the lead and I'm not sure how I'm going to deal with that.  I'll discuss that with my coach and see where we end up.

        Appreciate the advice so far and if you think of anything else. let me know.

        Thanks,

        Gary Williams

        From: SeanH <seanh242@...>
        To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, May 3, 2012 8:47 AM
        Subject: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Voluntary overtime

         
        I think I would let the team continue as-is, but I would communicate to the stakeholders that it is likely the team's output is likely to degrade. Explain that there are team members who are voluntarily putting in extra time, and that you don't expect that burst to be sustainable. That way you are preparing the right people for the inevitable drop in velocity that is coming. And if/when that drop does arrive, you have something to reflect upon with the team.

        --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Gary Williams <adtz_the_enchanter@...> wrote:
        >
        > I have a couple of developers on a high performing team that are consistently working overtime (nights, weekends).  I've verified that this self-generated and seems to be based on their interest in cracking the problems involved.  Do I try and discourage this based on the principle of sustainable pace?  My fear is that it will simply drive it underground which doesn't change anything and loses transparency.  The motto from a previous workplace was "you can't control the coding underground" and I think that fits here, but I'm concerned about burnout.  The application in question is new technology and a coding challenge both mathematically and graphically.  The team is producing wonderfully via what they call 'organized chaos' and I don't want to mess with what's working.
        >
        >
        > Any ideas?
        >
        > Gary Williams
        >



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