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Re: [leanagile] Re: [scrumdevelopment] Scrum Applied to General Management

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  • Andrew Pham
    Hi Paul, Glad to hear your feedback... Are you sure that you had read and understood Nonaka s and Takeuchi s article or just, like many of us, only heard about
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 3, 2011
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      Hi Paul,

      Glad to hear your feedback...

      Are you sure that you had read and understood Nonaka's and Takeuchi's article or just, like many of us, only heard about it? Was the article about the way General Manager/CEOs/CFOs worked and how to apply their work to software development? Or was it about the way the authors think teams should build new products such as printers and cars, etc?

      Please re-read it...

      Who of us know how a GM (General Manager) or CEO or CFO work to give them advise? Have you ever seen a CIO or a certified ScrumMaster trying to teach the CEO or GM or CFO of a company how to use Agile or Scrum?

      I myself recently tried to get the General Manager of my hair salon into Agile and Scrum but he instead asked me if I would like to have dinner with his CFO and some business partners to talk about M&A (Mergers and Acquisitions) and review some competitive analysis...Since I did not have much experience with M&A and competitive analysis, I politely declined thinking that I should probably focus on software development first...

      Cheers,

      Andrew

      Author of Scrum in Action, Agile Project Management and Development in the Real-World
      http://www.amazon.com/Scrum-Action-Andrew-Pham/dp/143545913X/ref=ntt_at_ep_dpi_1-1

      and of "Business-Driven IT-Wide Agile (Scrum) and/or Kanban (Lean) Implementation" (reviewed and upcoming)


      On Sat, Dec 3, 2011 at 9:10 PM, PAUL <beckfordp@...> wrote:
       



      Hi Andrew,

      Haven't you got that the wrong way around? It was business that taught Scrum to IT :)

      Nonaka and Takeuchi merely documented new product development practices that were already being practice by companies like Honda and Cannon as early as the 1980's. This is the roots of Scrum as we know it today.

      The real issue you identify here is mindset. The chaordic mindset that allowed these Japanese companies to embrace Scrum doesn't exist in most corporate boardrooms, especially outside Japan.

      So yes I agree with you that Scrum isn't about to revolutionise western management over night, but for different reasons then you state here :)

      Cheers,

      Paul.



      --- In leanagile@yahoogroups.com, Andrew Pham <andrewpham74@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi Wouter,
      >
      > Sounds interesting but to be honest with you I do not believe too much in
      > this using Scrum to transform the world, work, top management and all.
      >
      > We would do a better job at using Scrum effecrtively first to improve
      > software delivery in corporate environments (where software and IT are
      > considered to be more a problem and a cost center), rather than trying to
      > teach top management and the rest of the world how to use Scrum to
      > transofrm their work!
      >
      > When you know that most of our CIOs either are not invited at the CEO's
      > table or sit very tight and keep a very low profile when general management
      > speaks, it is almost utopia and a lack of humility to try to teach top
      > management to use Scrum to transform their work.
      >
      > Humility is key in life! (Even though I know some will dream and try to do
      > marketing and to make money this way but good luck!)
      >
      > Cheers,
      >
      > Andrew
      >
      > Author of *Scrum in Action**, Agile Project Management and Development in
      > the Real-World*
      > http://www.amazon.com/Scrum-Action-Andrew-Pham/dp/143545913X/ref=ntt_at_ep_dpi_
      > *1*<http://www.amazon.com/Scrum-Action-Andrew-Pham/dp/143545913X/ref=ntt_at_ep_dpi_1>
      > -1
      >
      > and of *"Business-Driven IT-Wide Agile (Scrum) and/or Kanban (Lean)
      > Implementation" **(reviewed and upcoming)*
      >
      >
      > On Wed, Nov 30, 2011 at 2:21 PM, Wouter Lagerweij <wouter@...>wrote:
      >
      > > **

      > >
      > >
      > > I can't really help with anything very practical, but I did do a little
      > > experiment with a (partially distributed) management team, which I wrote up
      > > in http://www.lagerweij.com/2011/05/20/scrum-for-management/
      > >
      > > In short: yes, improving communication and splitting work up in smaller
      > > parts works also for management teams. No, we didn't get a full
      > > cross-functional team (weren't really expecting that to happen), but people
      > > did get a better understanding of each-other's work. And yes, Scrums
      > > effects of making existing issues painfully obvious also worked well...
      > >
      > > Wouter
      > >
      > >
      > > On Wed, Nov 30, 2011 at 8:09 PM, Michael Wollin <yahoo@...>wrote:
      > >
      > >> **

      > >>
      > >>
      > >> I'm looking for good reference articles and books about HOW to apply
      > >> Scrum to general management. To be clear, it would be great to have
      > >> references for just managing, independent of and unrelated to software
      > >> projects.
      > >>
      > >> To quote our department VP, "If we could apply it effectively for [our
      > >> department's Mgmt], I would think it could be looked at for broader use in
      > >> [our division]."
      > >>
      > >> I am familiar with Jeff Sutherland's church example. Better would be a
      > >> management book and business articles with practical how to that uses
      > >> regular business domain as the example.
      > >>
      > >> Thanks.
      > >>
      > >> Michael
      > >>
      > >>
      > >
      > >
      > > --
      > > Wouter Lagerweij | wouter@...
      > > http://www.lagerweij.com | @wouterla <http://twitter.com/#%21/wouterla>
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >


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