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Re: [scrumdevelopment] Justify full Time Scrum Master? Need help

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  • Michael James
    ... Mark and I are both reacting to the phrase Tech Lead. While the step you ve taken will probably make things better, I m guessing an additional useful
    Message 1 of 16 , Dec 2, 2011
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      On Dec 1, 2011, at 6:11 PM, ag12340@... wrote:

      > I have decided to make my Tech Lead as "Scrum Master".

      Mark and I are both reacting to the phrase "Tech Lead." While the step you've taken will probably make things better, I'm guessing an additional useful step may be to reduce the influence of job titles and externally-designated hierarchies. I recently heard Jeff Sutherland talking about the effectiveness of teams without job titles at Bell Labs as inspiration for Scrum.

      Once your team understands the ScrumMaster's role a bit better, an interesting thing to explore would be asking the team to decide who their ScrumMaster should be.

      --mj
    • ag12340@rocketmail.com
      Thank you. That is a good suggestion. I will make expectations clear to the team from onset that roles like SM and tech lead are not sticky. It would be easy
      Message 2 of 16 , Dec 2, 2011
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        Thank you. That is a good suggestion.

        I will make expectations clear to the team from onset that roles like SM and tech lead are not sticky. It would be easy to do for SM as it is a new role and no one has it. It would be harder to do for tech lead. I will have to give it more thought. I do not want to demotivate people.


        --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Michael James <mj4scrum@...> wrote:
        >
        > On Dec 1, 2011, at 6:11 PM, ag12340@... wrote:
        >
        > > I have decided to make my Tech Lead as "Scrum Master".
        >
        > Mark and I are both reacting to the phrase "Tech Lead." While the step you've taken will probably make things better, I'm guessing an additional useful step may be to reduce the influence of job titles and externally-designated hierarchies. I recently heard Jeff Sutherland talking about the effectiveness of teams without job titles at Bell Labs as inspiration for Scrum.
        >
        > Once your team understands the ScrumMaster's role a bit better, an interesting thing to explore would be asking the team to decide who their ScrumMaster should be.
        >
        > --mj
        >
      • George Dinwiddie
        Hi, ag12340 ... If your expectation of Scrum is principally productivity improvement, and especially if you measure productivity using velocity, then, yes, you
        Message 3 of 16 , Dec 2, 2011
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          Hi, ag12340

          On 11/27/11 1:01 AM, ag12340@... wrote:
          > Actually quite small. We have very experienced team. Quality and
          > technical debt is not an issue at this point.
          >
          > That is actually one of my concerns with Scrum as I heard that with
          > Scrum technical debt increases and quality falls. I am assuming those
          > are experiences of bad teams.
          >
          >> As for productivity, how do you measure that now? How would you know it
          >> improved? More importantly, how would your customers/users know you
          >> improved?
          > Good question. We do not measure it now. We plan to use velocity to
          > measure it once we start doing scrum. I was hoping Scrum Master would
          > help me answer some of these questions.

          If your expectation of Scrum is principally productivity improvement,
          and especially if you measure productivity using velocity, then, yes,
          you are likely to experience an increase of technical debt and a
          decrease in quality.

          That's not how it works.

          Scrum, done well, can help you better do the right thing--not
          necessarily do it faster. If you also pay attention to quality (in many
          ways, not just the external aspects of the program being developed),
          then you may also achieve an increase in productivity.

          I've rarely, if ever, seen an increase in productivity in response to a
          desire to increase productivity. Going directly for that goal seems to
          give the /appearance/ of increased productivity, as quality is
          sacrificed to meet the measurement chosen as a proxy for productivity.
          This abandonment of focus on quality will, in a relatively short time,
          decrease productivity, perhaps to a point from which it is very hard to
          recover.

          Productivity is one of those desirables that seems best approached
          obliquely. If you focus on smooth flow, on increasing skill and
          knowledge, and on improved internal quality of the system, then
          productivity gains are likely to accompany.

          >>> I am new to Scrum. Attended 2 day training.

          Realize that there is much you do not know, and that some of it is
          things you think you know but don't realize the subtleties.

          >>> my title: dev manager

          In most organizations I've seen, you might not be the best person to
          lead the retrospectives--not if you want them to be effective. It's a
          rare manager who can do so.

          >>> current process: requirements doc, arch and design, iterative and
          >>> incremental dev, handoff to qa, deploy. We deploy every 3 months.
          >>>
          >>> Good things: We can go back and change requirements and design. PO and biz
          >>> owner is very involved and very accessible.

          That part sounds good.

          >>> Team: Cross functional 7 devs. QA is outside.

          That doesn't. If you want quality and productivity benefits, I suggest
          making QA part of the team.

          >>> My boss is onboard with Scrum. He loves 300% productivity improvement
          >>> scrum has many studies for and daily meetings.
          >>>
          >>> He thinks (wants) we should be able to hit 100% productivity improvement
          >>> in an year (our goal for Scrum) and 40% in 6 months.
          >>>
          >>> I requested for a full time scrum master. He want justification for extra
          >>> cost and wants to know why I or some PM cannot do it.

          You boss cannot be onboard with Scrum. He seems to know little or
          nothing about the heart of Scrum, but is only looking for cost savings.
          You cannot be onboard with something you don't understand (though you
          may think your are).

          >>> I said my hiring a full time SM, we will be able to reduce number of
          >>> developers by 2 (from 7 to 5) in an year and still get more done.

          What is your justification for that assertion?

          - George

          --
          ----------------------------------------------------------------------
          * George Dinwiddie * http://blog.gdinwiddie.com
          Software Development http://www.idiacomputing.com
          Consultant and Coach http://www.agilemaryland.org
          ----------------------------------------------------------------------
        • Andrew Pham
          On Mon, Nov 21, 2011 at 8:56 PM, ag12340@rocketmail.com
          Message 4 of 16 , Dec 3, 2011
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            On Mon, Nov 21, 2011 at 8:56 PM, ag12340@... <ag12340@...> wrote:
             

            I am new to Scrum. Attended 2 day training.

            my title: dev manager

            current process: requirements doc, arch and design, iterative and incremental dev, handoff to qa, deploy. We deploy every 3 months.

            Good things: We can go back and change requirements and design. PO and biz owner is very involved and very accessible.

            Team: Cross functional 7 devs. QA is outside.

            My boss is onboard with Scrum. He loves 300% productivity improvement scrum has many studies for and daily meetings.

            He thinks (wants) we should be able to hit 100% productivity improvement in an year (our goal for Scrum) and 40% in 6 months.

            I requested for a full time scrum master. He want justification for extra cost and wants to know why I or some PM cannot do it.

             
            There is no justification for a (certified) ScrumMaster, especially with people getting automatically a certification after a two-day class with no passing or failing test.

            Change is hard but Scrum itself, as a project management process framework, is very simple, especially after you get management's understanding and support as well as buying and excitement from the team.

            What you guys (and any project team new to Scrum) would need is a practicing coach to help you with the process, which they can learn by reading Ken's and Jeff's Scrum guide and one or two practical books and, especially, by working with and learning from the practicing coach.

            Cheers,

            Andrew

            Author of
            Scrum in Action, Agile Project Management and Development in the Real-World
            http://www.amazon.com/Scrum-Action-Andrew-Pham/dp/143545913X/ref=ntt_at_ep_dpi_1-1

            and of "Business-Driven IT-Wide Agile (Scrum) and/or Kanban (Lean) Implementation" (reviewed and upcoming)


            I said my hiring a full time SM, we will be able to reduce number of developers by 2 (from 7 to 5) in an year and still get more done.

            Is that a good justification? What else can I provide?



          • ag12340@rocketmail.com
            Thank you Andrew. I agree. It is important to have a coach for some initial period (few sprints, I guess time varies from team to team) and then have him come
            Message 5 of 16 , Dec 3, 2011
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              Thank you Andrew. I agree. It is important to have a coach for some initial period (few sprints, I guess time varies from team to team) and then have him come in from time to time.

              --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Andrew Pham <andrewpham74@...> wrote:
              >
              > On Mon, Nov 21, 2011 at 8:56 PM, ag12340@... <
              > ag12340@...> wrote:
              >
              > > **
              > >
              > >
              > > I am new to Scrum. Attended 2 day training.
              > >
              > > my title: dev manager
              > >
              > > current process: requirements doc, arch and design, iterative and
              > > incremental dev, handoff to qa, deploy. We deploy every 3 months.
              > >
              > > Good things: We can go back and change requirements and design. PO and biz
              > > owner is very involved and very accessible.
              > >
              > > Team: Cross functional 7 devs. QA is outside.
              > >
              > > My boss is onboard with Scrum. He loves 300% productivity improvement
              > > scrum has many studies for and daily meetings.
              > >
              > > He thinks (wants) we should be able to hit 100% productivity improvement
              > > in an year (our goal for Scrum) and 40% in 6 months.
              > >
              > > I requested for a full time scrum master. He want justification for extra
              > > cost and wants to know why I or some PM cannot do it.
              > >
              >
              > There is no justification for a (certified) ScrumMaster, especially with
              > people getting automatically a certification after a two-day class with no
              > passing or failing test.
              >
              > Change is hard but Scrum itself, as a project management process framework,
              > is very simple, especially after you get management's understanding and
              > support as well as buying and excitement from the team.
              >
              > What you guys (and any project team new to Scrum) would need is a
              > practicing coach to help you with the process, which they can learn by
              > reading Ken's and Jeff's Scrum guide and one or two practical books and,
              > especially, by working with and learning from the practicing coach.
              >
              > Cheers,
              >
              > Andrew
              >
              > Author of *Scrum in Action**, Agile Project Management and Development in
              > the Real-World*
              > http://www.amazon.com/Scrum-Action-Andrew-Pham/dp/143545913X/ref=ntt_at_ep_dpi_
              > *1*<http://www.amazon.com/Scrum-Action-Andrew-Pham/dp/143545913X/ref=ntt_at_ep_dpi_1>
              > -1
              >
              > and of *"Business-Driven IT-Wide Agile (Scrum) and/or Kanban (Lean)
              > Implementation" **(reviewed and upcoming)*
              >
              >
              > > I said my hiring a full time SM, we will be able to reduce number of
              > > developers by 2 (from 7 to 5) in an year and still get more done.
              > >
              > > Is that a good justification? What else can I provide?
              > >
              >
              > >
              > >
              >
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