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HR policies and Annual performance appraisals

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  • Ram Srinivasan
    Hello fellow agilists: Some of my thorniest problems have been HR policies, especially annual performance reviews where individuals are recognized and awarded.
    Message 1 of 9 , Nov 21, 2011
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      Hello fellow agilists:

      Some of my thorniest problems have been HR policies, especially annual performance reviews where individuals are recognized and awarded. On the contrary, Scrum (or most of the Agile methodologies that I know of ) promote team work.  How have you solved this problem ?

      What other problems did you guys face in transitioning from a regular (read waterfall SDLC) software dev organization when adopting agile methodologies ?

      Ram

    • v_balamurugan
      I precisely had the same question in my mind, looking forward to see few replies.
      Message 2 of 9 , Nov 21, 2011
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        I precisely had the same question in my mind, looking forward to see few replies.
      • Michael James
        Here s the book _Abolishing Performance Appraisals: Why They Backfire and What To Do Instead_:
        Message 3 of 9 , Nov 28, 2011
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          Here's the book _Abolishing Performance Appraisals: Why They Backfire and What To Do Instead_:

          I've written an article "What Your HR Department Doesn't Know About Scrum" for Better Software Magazine:

          See also Dan Pink on motivation:

          --mj

          On Nov 21, 2011, at 8:40 PM, v_balamurugan wrote:

           


          I precisely had the same question in my mind, looking forward to see few replies.


        • Charles Bradley - Scrum Coach CSM PSM I
          MJ, I think your article is excellent, though I had trouble discerning some of the takeaways.  One strong takeaway I got was allowing Scrum teams to choose
          Message 4 of 9 , Nov 30, 2011
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            MJ,

            I think your article is excellent, though I had trouble discerning some of the takeaways.  One strong takeaway I got was allowing Scrum teams to choose their own members, and having candidates "try out" for a day solving a simple programming problem.  I think these are excellent suggestions.

            OTOH, I had trouble discerning what your advice is about more practical matters like:
            a) How pay and/or pay incentives can be structured (are they decided by the one "plant manager" from the GE example?  I'd be interested to know how do the orgs you referenced do it.)
            b) How does a team fire or re-assign someone?  (You have a section on that but I didn't see any advice other than letting teams hire their own folks and encouraging the teams to have influence with the "hiring manager")
            c) How is the Scrum team held accountable for sub-par performance? Or performance with company goals?
            d) How is the newly hired person's salary/offer calculated?
             
            -------
            Charles Bradley, CSM, PSM I
            Experienced Scrum Coach
            My blog: http://scrumcrazy.wordpress.com/

            From: Michael James <mj4scrum@...>
            To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Monday, November 28, 2011 8:35 AM
            Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] HR policies and Annual performance appraisals



            Here's the book _Abolishing Performance Appraisals: Why They Backfire and What To Do Instead_:
            http://www.amazon.com/Abolishing-Performance-Appraisals-Backfire-Instead/dp/1576752003

            I've written an article "What Your HR Department Doesn't Know About Scrum" for Better Software Magazine:
            http://www.sendspace.com/pro/dl/vzocgh

            See also Dan Pink on motivation:
            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u6XAPnuFjJc

            --mj

            On Nov 21, 2011, at 8:40 PM, v_balamurugan wrote:

             

            I precisely had the same question in my mind, looking forward to see few replies.






          • ag12340@rocketmail.com
            ... A very different approach than that written by Nonaka and Takeuchi in their paper. Any case studies to prove that this approach is better in general or in
            Message 5 of 9 , Nov 30, 2011
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              >>One strong takeaway I got was allowing Scrum teams to choose their own members,

              A very different approach than that written by Nonaka and Takeuchi in their paper. Any case studies to prove that this approach is better in general or in specific context (what context would that be?) than Nonaka and Takeuchi approach of management carefully choosing team members?
              ( I am assuming you do not consider management as part of scrum team. chicken and pig thing.)

              >>...and having candidates "try out" for a day solving a simple programming problem.

              I saw few startup companies in Silicon valley hiring using this approach around 7 years back, but candidates worked with a team member for few hours rather than whole day. Not sure how common it is now.

              --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Charles Bradley - Scrum Coach CSM PSM I <chuck-lists2@...> wrote:
              >
              > MJ,
              >
              > I think your article is excellent, though I had trouble discerning some of the takeaways.  One strong takeaway I got was allowing Scrum teams to choose their own members, and having candidates "try out" for a day solving a simple programming problem.  I think these are excellent suggestions.
              >
              >
              > OTOH, I had trouble discerning what your advice is about more practical matters like:
              > a) How pay and/or pay incentives can be structured (are they decided by the one "plant manager" from the GE example?  I'd be interested to know how do the orgs you referenced do it.)
              > b) How does a team fire or re-assign someone?  (You have a section on that but I didn't see any advice other than letting teams hire their own folks and encouraging the teams to have influence with the "hiring manager")
              > c) How is the Scrum team held accountable for sub-par performance? Or performance with company goals?
              > d) How is the newly hired person's salary/offer calculated?
              >
              >  
              > -------
              > Charles Bradley, CSM, PSM I
              > Experienced Scrum Coach
              > My blog: http://scrumcrazy.wordpress.com/
              >
              >
              > >________________________________
              > > From: Michael James <mj4scrum@...>
              > >To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
              > >Sent: Monday, November 28, 2011 8:35 AM
              > >Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] HR policies and Annual performance appraisals
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >Here's the book _Abolishing Performance Appraisals: Why They Backfire and What To Do Instead_:
              > >http://www.amazon.com/Abolishing-Performance-Appraisals-Backfire-Instead/dp/1576752003
              > >
              > >
              > >I've written an article "What Your HR Department Doesn't Know About Scrum" for Better Software Magazine:
              > >http://www.sendspace.com/pro/dl/vzocgh
              > >
              > >
              > >See also Dan Pink on motivation:
              > >http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u6XAPnuFjJc
              > >
              > >
              > >--mj
              > >
              > >
              > >On Nov 21, 2011, at 8:40 PM, v_balamurugan wrote:
              > >
              > > 
              > >>
              > >>I precisely had the same question in my mind, looking forward to see few replies.
              > >>
              > >>
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
            • Gary Brown
              I saw few startup companies in Silicon valley hiring using this approach around 7 years back, but candidates worked with a team member for few hours rather
              Message 6 of 9 , Nov 30, 2011
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                "I saw few startup companies in Silicon valley hiring using this
                approach around 7 years back, but candidates worked with a team member
                for few hours rather than whole day. Not sure how common it is now."

                At CARFAX, all of our developer candidates pair in for half a day
                during their on-site interview, even the interns. They go through a
                series programming exercises designed to demonstrate Java, OO, and
                design knowledge. For most, it is their first exposure to pairing,
                TDD, refactoring, automated acceptance testing, and working in an open
                lab environment. It's a bit overwhelming for some, others love it.
                Either way, it's valuable information in the decision meeting.

                It gives us the opportunity to see their technical skills and allows
                them to experience what it is like to work in our environment. We
                started doing this about six years ago, after making a few hiring
                mistakes, by only judging a person technical skills from their answers
                in the interviews.

                Anyway, it works for us. Our turnover rate is less than 3% per year.

                GB.

                Gary Brown
                Evil Old XP Coach
                CARFAX, Inc.
                Columbia, MO


                Quoting "ag12340@..." <ag12340@...>:

                >>> One strong takeaway I got was allowing Scrum teams to choose their
                >>> own members,
                >
                > A very different approach than that written by Nonaka and Takeuchi
                > in their paper. Any case studies to prove that this approach is
                > better in general or in specific context (what context would that
                > be?) than Nonaka and Takeuchi approach of management carefully
                > choosing team members?
                > ( I am assuming you do not consider management as part of scrum
                > team. chicken and pig thing.)
                >
                >>> ...and having candidates "try out" for a day solving a simple
                >>> programming problem.
                >
                > I saw few startup companies in Silicon valley hiring using this
                > approach around 7 years back, but candidates worked with a team
                > member for few hours rather than whole day. Not sure how common it
                > is now.
                >
                > --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Charles Bradley - Scrum
                > Coach CSM PSM I <chuck-lists2@...> wrote:
                >>
                >> MJ,
                >>
                >> I think your article is excellent, though I had trouble discerning
                >> some of the takeaways.  One strong takeaway I got was allowing
                >> Scrum teams to choose their own members, and having candidates "try
                >> out" for a day solving a simple programming problem.  I think
                >> these are excellent suggestions.
                >>
                >>
                >> OTOH, I had trouble discerning what your advice is about more
                >> practical matters like:
                >> a) How pay and/or pay incentives can be structured (are they
                >> decided by the one "plant manager" from the GE example?  I'd be
                >> interested to know how do the orgs you referenced do it.)
                >> b) How does a team fire or re-assign someone?  (You have a section
                >> on that but I didn't see any advice other than letting teams hire
                >> their own folks and encouraging the teams to have influence with
                >> the "hiring manager")
                >> c) How is the Scrum team held accountable for sub-par performance?
                >> Or performance with company goals?
                >> d) How is the newly hired person's salary/offer calculated?
                >>
                >>  
                >> -------
                >> Charles Bradley, CSM, PSM I
                >> Experienced Scrum Coach
                >> My blog: http://scrumcrazy.wordpress.com/
                >>
                >>
                >> >________________________________
                >> > From: Michael James <mj4scrum@...>
                >> >To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                >> >Sent: Monday, November 28, 2011 8:35 AM
                >> >Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] HR policies and Annual performance
                >> appraisals
                >> >
                >> >
                >> >
                >> >
                >> >
                >> >Here's the book _Abolishing Performance Appraisals: Why They
                >> Backfire and What To Do Instead_:
                >> >http://www.amazon.com/Abolishing-Performance-Appraisals-Backfire-Instead/dp/1576752003
                >> >
                >> >
                >> >I've written an article "What Your HR Department Doesn't Know
                >> About Scrum" for Better Software Magazine:
                >> >http://www.sendspace.com/pro/dl/vzocgh
                >> >
                >> >
                >> >See also Dan Pink on motivation:
                >> >http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u6XAPnuFjJc
                >> >
                >> >
                >> >--mj
                >> >
                >> >
                >> >On Nov 21, 2011, at 8:40 PM, v_balamurugan wrote:
                >> >
                >> > 
                >> >>
                >> >>I precisely had the same question in my mind, looking forward to
                >> see few replies.
                >> >>
                >> >>
                >> >
                >> >
                >> >
                >> >
                >> >
                >> >
                >>
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > ------------------------------------
                >
                > To Post a message, send it to: scrumdevelopment@...
                > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
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                >
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              • Wouter Lagerweij
                Hi Gary, Two things. 1. I ve just started introducing this at work: having programmers do actual programming during the interview. I haven t hired anyone yet,
                Message 7 of 9 , Nov 30, 2011
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                  Hi Gary,

                  Two things.

                  1. I've just started introducing this at work: having programmers do actual programming during the interview. I haven't hired anyone yet, so we'll have to wait and see what the results are for us.

                  Gary Brown
                  Evil Old XP Coach

                  2. I love your job title :-)

                  Wouter

                   
                  --
                  Wouter Lagerweij         | wouter@...
                • Don Gray
                  Michael, ... The reprint has advertising information where the references normally appear. Could you post the list of citations? -- Don Gray (336)414-4645
                  Message 8 of 9 , Dec 20, 2011
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                    Michael,

                    > I've written an article "What Your HR Department Doesn't Know About
                    > Scrum" for Better Software Magazine:
                    > http://www.sendspace.com/pro/dl/vzocgh
                    >
                    The reprint has advertising information where the references
                    normally appear. Could you post the list of citations?

                    --
                    Don Gray (336)414-4645
                    http://www.donaldegray.com

                    Traditions are group efforts to keep the unexpected from happening.
                    Barbara Tober

                    Break tradition at the AYE Conference
                    AYE: Exploring Human Systems in Action http://www.AYEconference.com
                    Nov 4 - 8, 2012
                  • Michael James
                    Don (and anyone else interested), 2 quoting Mishkin Berteig, CST 3 For other typical large-organization challenges, see
                    Message 9 of 9 , Dec 20, 2011
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                      Don (and anyone else interested),

                      2 quoting Mishkin Berteig, CST
                      3 For other typical large-organization challenges, see http://blogs.collab.net/agile/2009/10/22/distracted-unproductive-thank-resource-management/
                      4 Punished By Rewards, Alfie Kohn (1999)
                      5 Psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi has documented the relationship between individual autonomy and task absorption in several books, including Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience (1991)
                      6 To learn about the relationship between team autonomy, flow, and productivity see Group Genius, Keith Sawyer (2007)
                      7 Abolishing Performance Appraisals: Why They Backfire and What to Do Instead, Coens/Jenkins (2000)
                      8 “In eight of the nine tasks we examined across the three experiments, higher incentives led to worse performance. In fact, we were surprised by the robustness of the effect” Dan Ariely, Uri Gneezy, George Loewenstein, and Nina Mazar (2005) “Large Stakes and Big Mistakes” Working Papers No. 5-011, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston
                      9 Example ScrumMaster responsibilities described at http://blogs.danube.com/a-scrummasters-checklist
                      10 Felps, W., Mitchell, T. R., & Byington, E. (2006). How, when, and why bad apples spoil the barrel: Negative group members and dysfunctional groups. Research in Organizational Behavior, Volume 27, 181–230

                      --mj

                      On Dec 20, 2011, at 3:58 AM, Don Gray wrote:

                      > Michael,
                      >
                      >> I've written an article "What Your HR Department Doesn't Know About
                      >> Scrum" for Better Software Magazine:
                      >> http://www.sendspace.com/pro/dl/vzocgh
                      >>
                      > The reprint has advertising information where the references
                      > normally appear. Could you post the list of citations?
                      >
                      > --
                      > Don Gray (336)414-4645
                      > http://www.donaldegray.com
                      >
                      > Traditions are group efforts to keep the unexpected from happening.
                      > Barbara Tober
                      >
                      > Break tradition at the AYE Conference
                      > AYE: Exploring Human Systems in Action http://www.AYEconference.com
                      > Nov 4 - 8, 2012
                      >
                      >
                      > ------------------------------------
                      >
                      > To Post a message, send it to: scrumdevelopment@...
                      > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: scrumdevelopment-unsubscribe@...! Groups Links
                      >
                      >
                      >
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