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Re: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Why can't I take a day off during a Sprint ?

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  • George Dinwiddie
    Malapine, ... What percentage of companies are the best company on Earth or fabulous places to work? I d reckon it s pretty small, particularly when you
    Message 1 of 43 , Nov 21, 2011
      Malapine,

      On 11/21/11 11:54 AM, Malapine wrote:
      > George Dinwiddie<lists@...> wrote:
      >>
      >>> If you're a competent developer and you stayed for 20+ years,
      >>> it's either the best company on Earth; or (much more likely)
      >>> you are/were too risk-averse or too poor at networking to go
      >>> out and find a better job.
      >>
      >> Applying the rule of three: If you can't think of three
      >> interpretations, then you haven't thought about it enough.
      >> I can think of numerous other possibilities.
      >
      > If it's not #1 (fabulous place to work) but you've stayed there
      > two decades anyway, can you suggest an interpretation that won't
      > eliminate you from consideration as an agile team member?

      What percentage of companies are "the best company on Earth" or
      "fabulous places to work?" I'd reckon it's pretty small, particularly
      when you talking about moderate to large companies.

      Few places are monolithicly good or bad. Nor do they tend to stay the
      same over time. I've worked for companies that weren't close to
      fabulous, but I really enjoyed the people with whom I worked. I've
      known people to stick with a job because they loved working in that
      domain and felt it was important; other companies doing similar work
      were probably no better. I've seen people be very happy with their job
      until their direct manager moved on, and then they hated it.

      Note that in the situation being discussed, the Agile team also worked
      for this company that you presume to be so undesirable that the only
      honorable course of action is to leave.

      - George

      One choice is a trap. Two choices is a dilemma. Three choices is a choice.

      --
      ----------------------------------------------------------------------
      * George Dinwiddie * http://blog.gdinwiddie.com
      Software Development http://www.idiacomputing.com
      Consultant and Coach http://www.agilemaryland.org
      ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    • George Dinwiddie
      Malapine, ... What percentage of companies are the best company on Earth or fabulous places to work? I d reckon it s pretty small, particularly when you
      Message 43 of 43 , Nov 21, 2011
        Malapine,

        On 11/21/11 11:54 AM, Malapine wrote:
        > George Dinwiddie<lists@...> wrote:
        >>
        >>> If you're a competent developer and you stayed for 20+ years,
        >>> it's either the best company on Earth; or (much more likely)
        >>> you are/were too risk-averse or too poor at networking to go
        >>> out and find a better job.
        >>
        >> Applying the rule of three: If you can't think of three
        >> interpretations, then you haven't thought about it enough.
        >> I can think of numerous other possibilities.
        >
        > If it's not #1 (fabulous place to work) but you've stayed there
        > two decades anyway, can you suggest an interpretation that won't
        > eliminate you from consideration as an agile team member?

        What percentage of companies are "the best company on Earth" or
        "fabulous places to work?" I'd reckon it's pretty small, particularly
        when you talking about moderate to large companies.

        Few places are monolithicly good or bad. Nor do they tend to stay the
        same over time. I've worked for companies that weren't close to
        fabulous, but I really enjoyed the people with whom I worked. I've
        known people to stick with a job because they loved working in that
        domain and felt it was important; other companies doing similar work
        were probably no better. I've seen people be very happy with their job
        until their direct manager moved on, and then they hated it.

        Note that in the situation being discussed, the Agile team also worked
        for this company that you presume to be so undesirable that the only
        honorable course of action is to leave.

        - George

        One choice is a trap. Two choices is a dilemma. Three choices is a choice.

        --
        ----------------------------------------------------------------------
        * George Dinwiddie * http://blog.gdinwiddie.com
        Software Development http://www.idiacomputing.com
        Consultant and Coach http://www.agilemaryland.org
        ----------------------------------------------------------------------
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