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Training for all scrum members

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  • Emma G
    Hi I am a developer on an agile project. I am enjoying working in this way, and can see many of the benefits over some of the previous waterfall projects I
    Message 1 of 17 , Sep 20, 2011
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      Hi

      I am a developer on an agile project. I am enjoying working in this way, and can see many of the benefits over some of the previous waterfall projects I have worked on.

      However, we haven't all had formal training in the agile approach, but instead have picked this up from the other team members, some who have been on courses and fed back to the rest of the team. We also pick up a lot of knowledge from the retrospective such as what to keep doing or stop doing. I haven't yet been scrum master for a sprint, but there are several developers who have (as well as BAs and one of our testers). Therefore members of the team may have more knowledge of agile than others, but I don't know if this could be detrimental to the sprint or not.

      Do you think that every team member therefore have some form of formal agile training, or even scrum master training? Or do you feel it is sufficient to pick it up from the rest of the team?

      Thanks

      Emma

    • Chet Hendrickson
      Hello Emma, There are a lot of things developers on agile projects need to know to get to done each sprint and to maintain a consistent velocity. It is
      Message 2 of 17 , Sep 21, 2011
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        Re: [scrumdevelopment] Training for all scrum members Hello Emma,

        There are a lot of things developers on agile projects need to know to get to done each sprint and to maintain a consistent velocity. It is possible to learn those things on your own, but that is not the most effective way to go about it.  This is the reason the SA created the CSD program.

        chet 

        Tuesday, September 20, 2011, 9:08:43 AM, you wrote:


          
        Hi
        I am a developer on an agile project. I am enjoying working in this way, and can see many of the benefits over some of the previous waterfall projects I have worked on. 
        However, we haven't all had formal training in the agile approach, but instead have picked this up from the other team members, some who have been on courses and fed back to the rest of the team. We also pick up a lot of knowledge from the retrospective such as what to keep doing or stop doing. I haven't yet been scrum master for a sprint, but there are several developers who have (as well as BAs and one of our testers). Therefore members of the team may have more knowledge of agile than others, but I don't know if this could be detrimental to the sprint or not.
        Do you think that every team member therefore have some form of formal agile training, or even scrum master training? Or do you feel it is sufficient to pick it up from the rest of the team? 
        Thanks
        Emma




        -- 
        Best regards,
         Chet Hendrickson                          
        mailto:lists@...
         Check out our upcoming CSM Plus courses @
        http://hendricksonxp.com/index.php?option=com_eventlist&Itemid=28
      • Alan Dayley
        My father used to say Education is condensed experience. Training is that, to some extent. So, while the teams still have to experience much to fully
        Message 3 of 17 , Sep 21, 2011
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          My father used to say "Education is condensed experience."  Training is that, to some extent.  So, while the teams still have to experience much to fully understand, Agile training compresses the learning curve to get to good results quickly.

          A simple, single and significant advantage of having everyone trained is the establishment of a common vocabulary.  Everyone knows what a Sprint means and how long one should be.  Everyone has the same definition of the Scrum framework.  In this way, less time is spent discussing what Scrum "is" instead of learning how to do your work within Scrum.

          Training everyone is good, yes.  Maybe not CSM but something consistent and more than just a two-hour slide deck.

          Alan

          On Tue, Sep 20, 2011 at 6:08 AM, Emma G <emmagarland77@...> wrote:
           

          Hi

          I am a developer on an agile project. I am enjoying working in this way, and can see many of the benefits over some of the previous waterfall projects I have worked on.

          However, we haven't all had formal training in the agile approach, but instead have picked this up from the other team members, some who have been on courses and fed back to the rest of the team. We also pick up a lot of knowledge from the retrospective such as what to keep doing or stop doing. I haven't yet been scrum master for a sprint, but there are several developers who have (as well as BAs and one of our testers). Therefore members of the team may have more knowledge of agile than others, but I don't know if this could be detrimental to the sprint or not.

          Do you think that every team member therefore have some form of formal agile training, or even scrum master training? Or do you feel it is sufficient to pick it up from the rest of the team?

          Thanks

          Emma


        • Michael James
          One thing I would *not* recommend is training only the people management has designated as ScrumMasters. I ve gone on too many gigs where the person in the
          Message 4 of 17 , Sep 21, 2011
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            One thing I would *not* recommend is training only the people management has designated as ScrumMasters.  I've gone on too many gigs where the person in the room who was the furthest from getting Scrum was also the person management had picked as a ScrumMaster, often someone who used to be a project manager and wasn't particularly effective at that either.  (Jean Richardson said she'd blog about this some time.  Someone nag her.)

            --mj

            On Sep 20, 2011, at 6:08 AM, Emma G wrote:

             

            Hi

            I am a developer on an agile project. I am enjoying working in this way, and can see many of the benefits over some of the previous waterfall projects I have worked on.

            However, we haven't all had formal training in the agile approach, but instead have picked this up from the other team members, some who have been on courses and fed back to the rest of the team. We also pick up a lot of knowledge from the retrospective such as what to keep doing or stop doing. I haven't yet been scrum master for a sprint, but there are several developers who have (as well as BAs and one of our testers). Therefore members of the team may have more knowledge of agile than others, but I don't know if this could be detrimental to the sprint or not.

            Do you think that every team member therefore have some form of formal agile training, or even scrum master training? Or do you feel it is sufficient to pick it up from the rest of the team?

            Thanks

            Emma



          • Peter Stevens
            Paraphrasing Marten Mickos, founder of MySQL, I would say: Some people invest time in self study and learning-by-doing to save money. Others invest money in
            Message 5 of 17 , Sep 21, 2011
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              Paraphrasing Marten Mickos, founder of MySQL, I would say: Some people invest time in self study and learning-by-doing to save money. Others invest money in training and coaching to save time and reduce risk of failure.

              When I go in to a retrospective with teams who I have not formally learned Scrum, the participants are usally pretty shocked to discover how weak their understanding is. On the other hand, when I work with a team intensively (and team includes their immediate management and stakeholders), it is equally stunning how quickly they get it and come into a high state of productivity and satisfaction with Scrum. So yes, I recommend training everbody (and I would be in a different business if I didn't believe that).

              I find three days the most effective. It dramatically reduces the need for coaching down the road.

              Peter


              On 21.09.11 15:57, Alan Dayley wrote:  

              My father used to say "Education is condensed experience."  Training is that, to some extent.  So, while the teams still have to experience much to fully understand, Agile training compresses the learning curve to get to good results quickly.


              A simple, single and significant advantage of having everyone trained is the establishment of a common vocabulary.  Everyone knows what a Sprint means and how long one should be.  Everyone has the same definition of the Scrum framework.  In this way, less time is spent discussing what Scrum "is" instead of learning how to do your work within Scrum.

              Training everyone is good, yes.  Maybe not CSM but something consistent and more than just a two-hour slide deck.

              Alan

              On Tue, Sep 20, 2011 at 6:08 AM, Emma G <emmagarland77@...> wrote:
               

              Hi

              I am a developer on an agile project. I am enjoying working in this way, and can see many of the benefits over some of the previous waterfall projects I have worked on.

              However, we haven't all had formal training in the agile approach, but instead have picked this up from the other team members, some who have been on courses and fed back to the rest of the team. We also pick up a lot of knowledge from the retrospective such as what to keep doing or stop doing. I haven't yet been scrum master for a sprint, but there are several developers who have (as well as BAs and one of our testers). Therefore members of the team may have more knowledge of agile than others, but I don't know if this could be detrimental to the sprint or not.

              Do you think that every team member therefore have some form of formal agile training, or even scrum master training? Or do you feel it is sufficient to pick it up from the rest of the team?

              Thanks

              Emma




              -- 
              Peter Stevens
              Scrum Trainer & Coach
              
              Switzerland: direct: +41 44 586 6450     cell: +41 79 422 6722
              USA:         direct: +1 202 657 6450 
              World:       skype:  peterstev
              
              blog:        http://scrum-breakfast.com
              
            • JackM
              The more folks that are trained the better. One way to accomplish this is to have a consultant come in. Or alternatively send one or two folks for training and
              Message 6 of 17 , Sep 21, 2011
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                The more folks that are trained the better. One way to accomplish this is to have a consultant come in. Or alternatively send one or two folks for training and have them train the rest of the group. I'd advise both scrum master and product owner training.

                Hope this helps
                Jack
                www.agilebuuddy.com

                --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "Emma G" <emmagarland77@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                > Hi
                >
                > I am a developer on an agile project. I am enjoying working in this way,
                > and can see many of the benefits over some of the previous waterfall
                > projects I have worked on.
                >
                > However, we haven't all had formal training in the agile approach, but
                > instead have picked this up from the other team members, some who have
                > been on courses and fed back to the rest of the team. We also pick up a
                > lot of knowledge from the retrospective such as what to keep doing or
                > stop doing. I haven't yet been scrum master for a sprint, but there are
                > several developers who have (as well as BAs and one of our testers).
                > Therefore members of the team may have more knowledge of agile than
                > others, but I don't know if this could be detrimental to the sprint or
                > not.
                >
                > Do you think that every team member therefore have some form of formal
                > agile training, or even scrum master training? Or do you feel it is
                > sufficient to pick it up from the rest of the team?
                >
                > Thanks
                >
                > Emma
                >
              • Kurt Häusler
                ... A lot of us do it becuase it is fun and we care.
                Message 7 of 17 , Sep 22, 2011
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                  On Wed, Sep 21, 2011 at 6:17 PM, Peter Stevens <peterstev@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Paraphrasing Marten Mickos, founder of MySQL, I would say: Some people invest time in self study and learning-by-doing to save money. Others invest money in training and coaching to save time and reduce risk of failure.

                  A lot of us do it becuase it is fun and we care.
                • Prashant Pund
                  Hello Emma, This is a typical situation. The team members are left alone to understand the Agile principles on their own. With the peers, perhaps the rituals
                  Message 8 of 17 , Sep 22, 2011
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                    Hello Emma,
                    This is a typical situation. The team members are left alone to understand the Agile principles on their own. With the peers, perhaps the rituals in Scrum may be understood; but with formal training you also understand the rationale behind them. I therefore feel that a formal training session by either the Scrum Master in the organization or external trainer is needed. The peers and the Scrum Master may guide you on the job after the formal training.
                    -- 
                    Warm regards,
                    Prashant Pund
                     
                    Keep it short and simple , always.



                    On Tue, Sep 20, 2011 at 6:38 PM, Emma G <emmagarland77@...> wrote:
                     

                    Hi

                    I am a developer on an agile project. I am enjoying working in this way, and can see many of the benefits over some of the previous waterfall projects I have worked on.

                    However, we haven't all had formal training in the agile approach, but instead have picked this up from the other team members, some who have been on courses and fed back to the rest of the team. We also pick up a lot of knowledge from the retrospective such as what to keep doing or stop doing. I haven't yet been scrum master for a sprint, but there are several developers who have (as well as BAs and one of our testers). Therefore members of the team may have more knowledge of agile than others, but I don't know if this could be detrimental to the sprint or not.

                    Do you think that every team member therefore have some form of formal agile training, or even scrum master training? Or do you feel it is sufficient to pick it up from the rest of the team?

                    Thanks

                    Emma





                  • Cheng, Richard
                    I agree that having a shared training experience is a great way to come to a common understanding of Scrum while creating bonding and shared aha moments. I
                    Message 9 of 17 , Sep 22, 2011
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                      I agree that having a shared training experience is a great way to come to a common understanding of Scrum while creating bonding and shared "aha" moments.  

                      I think that training is great and an excellent want to get started, but also having experience helps.  Having someone thats "been there and done that" is a great way to bring Agile lessons learned to the team.  Whether it happens via an internal employee, hiring someone with experience, or bringing in a coach or mentor, I think it is helpful.  If nothing else, reaching out and getting involved in the the local Agile/Scrum community groups is a great way to get deep and learn quickly.

                      I also fell that too many times we focus much on the Scrum process and we forget about teaching/learning/implementing sound Agile engineering practices.  For these pieces, katas (workshop) type learning I've seen pay off well.  The idea of coding "ping-pong" seems particularly effective.

                      Hope this helps and enjoy your Agile journey.
                      ------------------------------
                      Richard K Cheng, PMP, CSP
                      Managing Consultant
                      Agile Center of Excellence, Lead
                      Excella Consulting
                      richard.cheng@... 


                      From: Alan Dayley <alandd@...>
                      Reply-To: "scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com" <scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com>
                      Date: Wed, 21 Sep 2011 09:57:49 -0400
                      To: "scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com" <scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com>
                      Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Training for all scrum members

                       

                      My father used to say "Education is condensed experience."  Training is that, to some extent.  So, while the teams still have to experience much to fully understand, Agile training compresses the learning curve to get to good results quickly.


                      A simple, single and significant advantage of having everyone trained is the establishment of a common vocabulary.  Everyone knows what a Sprint means and how long one should be.  Everyone has the same definition of the Scrum framework.  In this way, less time is spent discussing what Scrum "is" instead of learning how to do your work within Scrum.

                      Training everyone is good, yes.  Maybe not CSM but something consistent and more than just a two-hour slide deck.

                      Alan

                      On Tue, Sep 20, 2011 at 6:08 AM, Emma G <emmagarland77@...> wrote:
                       

                      Hi

                      I am a developer on an agile project. I am enjoying working in this way, and can see many of the benefits over some of the previous waterfall projects I have worked on.

                      However, we haven't all had formal training in the agile approach, but instead have picked this up from the other team members, some who have been on courses and fed back to the rest of the team. We also pick up a lot of knowledge from the retrospective such as what to keep doing or stop doing. I haven't yet been scrum master for a sprint, but there are several developers who have (as well as BAs and one of our testers). Therefore members of the team may have more knowledge of agile than others, but I don't know if this could be detrimental to the sprint or not.

                      Do you think that every team member therefore have some form of formal agile training, or even scrum master training? Or do you feel it is sufficient to pick it up from the rest of the team?

                      Thanks

                      Emma


                    • Peter Stevens
                      ... +1 -- Peter Stevens Scrum Trainer & Coach Switzerland: direct: +41 44 586 6450 cell: +41 79 422 6722 USA: direct: +1 202 657 6450 World:
                      Message 10 of 17 , Sep 23, 2011
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                        On 22.09.11 10:03, Kurt Häusler wrote:
                        > A lot of us do it becuase it is fun and we care.
                        +1

                        --
                        Peter Stevens
                        Scrum Trainer & Coach

                        Switzerland: direct: +41 44 586 6450 cell: +41 79 422 6722
                        USA: direct: +1 202 657 6450
                        World: skype: peterstev

                        blog: http://scrum-breakfast.com
                      • Huet
                        Emma, I agree that training is an excellent way to jump-start an inexperienced team. But one thing is missing from your description - READING. What books and
                        Message 11 of 17 , Sep 23, 2011
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                          Emma,

                          I agree that training is an excellent way to jump-start an inexperienced team. But one thing is missing from your description - READING.

                          What books and papers have you (and your teams) read about Scrum/XP/ATDD etc.?

                          What books are in your team "library"?

                          Do you have "brown bag" lunches to discuss what you are reading?

                          Regards,
                          Huet Landry



                          --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "Emma G" <emmagarland77@...> wrote:
                          >
                          >
                          > Hi
                          >
                          > I am a developer on an agile project. I am enjoying working in this way,
                          > and can see many of the benefits over some of the previous waterfall
                          > projects I have worked on.
                          >
                          > However, we haven't all had formal training in the agile approach, but
                          > instead have picked this up from the other team members, some who have
                          > been on courses and fed back to the rest of the team. We also pick up a
                          > lot of knowledge from the retrospective such as what to keep doing or
                          > stop doing. I haven't yet been scrum master for a sprint, but there are
                          > several developers who have (as well as BAs and one of our testers).
                          > Therefore members of the team may have more knowledge of agile than
                          > others, but I don't know if this could be detrimental to the sprint or
                          > not.
                          >
                          > Do you think that every team member therefore have some form of formal
                          > agile training, or even scrum master training? Or do you feel it is
                          > sufficient to pick it up from the rest of the team?
                          >
                          > Thanks
                          >
                          > Emma
                          >
                        • Hans C. Zizi
                          Hi All, Last year, Scott Downey of Rapidscrum.com released Roboscrum, a tool that has a number of very useful metrics and their formulas for measuring Scrum
                          Message 12 of 17 , Sep 24, 2011
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                            Hi All,

                             

                            Last year, Scott Downey of Rapidscrum.com released Roboscrum, a tool that has a number of very useful metrics and their formulas for measuring Scrum Projects.  

                            They include metrics such as Focus Factor, Targeted Value Contribution Increase, Adopted Work, Accuracy of Commit, Accuracy of Estimations, Found Work and many others.  Some of those metrics appear somewhat esoteric.  What metrics do you guys find most useful in your everyday practice besides tracking Velocity and  Burndown, or perhaps Work Capacity?

                             

                             

                             

                            Cheers

                             

                             

                            Hans Zizi

                             

                             

                             

                            From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Prashant Pund
                            Sent: Thursday, September 22, 2011 11:18 AM
                            To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Training for all scrum members

                             

                             

                            Hello Emma,

                            This is a typical situation. The team members are left alone to understand the Agile principles on their own. With the peers, perhaps the rituals in Scrum may be understood; but with formal training you also understand the rationale behind them. I therefore feel that a formal training session by either the Scrum Master in the organization or external trainer is needed. The peers and the Scrum Master may guide you on the job after the formal training.

                            -- 

                            Warm regards,

                            Prashant Pund

                             

                            Keep it short and simple , always.

                             

                             

                            On Tue, Sep 20, 2011 at 6:38 PM, Emma G <emmagarland77@...> wrote:

                             

                            Hi

                            I am a developer on an agile project. I am enjoying working in this way, and can see many of the benefits over some of the previous waterfall projects I have worked on.

                            However, we haven't all had formal training in the agile approach, but instead have picked this up from the other team members, some who have been on courses and fed back to the rest of the team. We also pick up a lot of knowledge from the retrospective such as what to keep doing or stop doing. I haven't yet been scrum master for a sprint, but there are several developers who have (as well as BAs and one of our testers). Therefore members of the team may have more knowledge of agile than others, but I don't know if this could be detrimental to the sprint or not.

                            Do you think that every team member therefore have some form of formal agile training, or even scrum master training? Or do you feel it is sufficient to pick it up from the rest of the team?

                            Thanks

                            Emma



                             

                             

                          • Wouter Lagerweij
                            Hi, I generally try to keep tracking metrics kept to a minimum, and introduce them only for specific improvement efforts. Velocity is useful (keeping variance
                            Message 13 of 17 , Sep 24, 2011
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                              Hi,

                              I generally try to keep tracking metrics kept to a minimum, and introduce them only for specific improvement efforts.

                              Velocity is useful (keeping variance in mind) for release planning, so that one is default. Planned and actual velocity is sometimes interesting, but I hardly ever find that the team needs that tracked explicitly, and usually after a few sprints there's no difference (or the difference is within expected variance range).

                              Sometimes we track tasks done on the burn-down/up chart, if I feel the team can benefit from some insights there. This is the case when lots of tasks are found during the sprint, for instance. Or when many unplanned items come in during the sprint.

                              Unplanned items can be tracked separately if the team suffers from many interruptions, especially when they think that is normal. This allows them to do some root cause analysis to find where those items come from (quality of code? not enough testing? unclear requirements?) and improve on those issues.

                              One metric that can be very useful, especially when trying to get the broader organisation to get into the Agile spriti of things, is lead time, preferably combined with a process effectiveness percentage. A value stream map can get you going there, but tracking the lead time makes it possible to know if you've improved.

                              Wouter

                              On Sat, Sep 24, 2011 at 1:06 PM, Hans C. Zizi <hans.c.zizi@...> wrote:
                               

                              Hi All,

                               

                              Last year, Scott Downey of Rapidscrum.com released Roboscrum, a tool that has a number of very useful metrics and their formulas for measuring Scrum Projects.  

                              They include metrics such as Focus Factor, Targeted Value Contribution Increase, Adopted Work, Accuracy of Commit, Accuracy of Estimations, Found Work and many others.  Some of those metrics appear somewhat esoteric.  What metrics do you guys find most useful in your everyday practice besides tracking Velocity and  Burndown, or perhaps Work Capacity?

                               

                               

                               

                              Cheers

                               

                               

                              Hans Zizi

                               

                               

                               

                              From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Prashant Pund
                              Sent: Thursday, September 22, 2011 11:18 AM
                              To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Training for all scrum members

                               

                               

                              Hello Emma,

                              This is a typical situation. The team members are left alone to understand the Agile principles on their own. With the peers, perhaps the rituals in Scrum may be understood; but with formal training you also understand the rationale behind them. I therefore feel that a formal training session by either the Scrum Master in the organization or external trainer is needed. The peers and the Scrum Master may guide you on the job after the formal training.

                              -- 

                              Warm regards,

                              Prashant Pund

                               

                              Keep it short and simple , always.

                               

                               

                              On Tue, Sep 20, 2011 at 6:38 PM, Emma G <emmagarland77@...> wrote:

                               

                              Hi

                              I am a developer on an agile project. I am enjoying working in this way, and can see many of the benefits over some of the previous waterfall projects I have worked on.

                              However, we haven't all had formal training in the agile approach, but instead have picked this up from the other team members, some who have been on courses and fed back to the rest of the team. We also pick up a lot of knowledge from the retrospective such as what to keep doing or stop doing. I haven't yet been scrum master for a sprint, but there are several developers who have (as well as BAs and one of our testers). Therefore members of the team may have more knowledge of agile than others, but I don't know if this could be detrimental to the sprint or not.

                              Do you think that every team member therefore have some form of formal agile training, or even scrum master training? Or do you feel it is sufficient to pick it up from the rest of the team?

                              Thanks

                              Emma



                               

                               




                              --
                              Wouter Lagerweij         | wouter@...
                            • Hans C. Zizi
                              Thank you From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Wouter Lagerweij Sent: Saturday, September 24, 2011
                              Message 14 of 17 , Sep 27, 2011
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                                Thank you

                                 

                                From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Wouter Lagerweij
                                Sent: Saturday, September 24, 2011 10:24 AM
                                To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Scrum Metrics in Practice

                                 

                                 

                                Hi,

                                 

                                I generally try to keep tracking metrics kept to a minimum, and introduce them only for specific improvement efforts.

                                 

                                Velocity is useful (keeping variance in mind) for release planning, so that one is default. Planned and actual velocity is sometimes interesting, but I hardly ever find that the team needs that tracked explicitly, and usually after a few sprints there's no difference (or the difference is within expected variance range).

                                 

                                Sometimes we track tasks done on the burn-down/up chart, if I feel the team can benefit from some insights there. This is the case when lots of tasks are found during the sprint, for instance. Or when many unplanned items come in during the sprint.

                                 

                                Unplanned items can be tracked separately if the team suffers from many interruptions, especially when they think that is normal. This allows them to do some root cause analysis to find where those items come from (quality of code? not enough testing? unclear requirements?) and improve on those issues.

                                One metric that can be very useful, especially when trying to get the broader organisation to get into the Agile spriti of things, is lead time, preferably combined with a process effectiveness percentage. A value stream map can get you going there, but tracking the lead time makes it possible to know if you've improved.

                                 

                                Wouter

                                On Sat, Sep 24, 2011 at 1:06 PM, Hans C. Zizi <hans.c.zizi@...> wrote:

                                 

                                Hi All,

                                 

                                Last year, Scott Downey of Rapidscrum.com released Roboscrum, a tool that has a number of very useful metrics and their formulas for measuring Scrum Projects.  

                                They include metrics such as Focus Factor, Targeted Value Contribution Increase, Adopted Work, Accuracy of Commit, Accuracy of Estimations, Found Work and many others.  Some of those metrics appear somewhat esoteric.  What metrics do you guys find most useful in your everyday practice besides tracking Velocity and  Burndown, or perhaps Work Capacity?

                                 

                                 

                                 

                                Cheers

                                 

                                 

                                Hans Zizi

                                 

                                 

                                 

                                From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Prashant Pund
                                Sent: Thursday, September 22, 2011 11:18 AM
                                To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Training for all scrum members

                                 

                                 

                                Hello Emma,

                                This is a typical situation. The team members are left alone to understand the Agile principles on their own. With the peers, perhaps the rituals in Scrum may be understood; but with formal training you also understand the rationale behind them. I therefore feel that a formal training session by either the Scrum Master in the organization or external trainer is needed. The peers and the Scrum Master may guide you on the job after the formal training.

                                -- 

                                Warm regards,

                                Prashant Pund

                                 

                                Keep it short and simple , always.

                                 

                                 

                                On Tue, Sep 20, 2011 at 6:38 PM, Emma G <emmagarland77@...> wrote:

                                 

                                Hi

                                I am a developer on an agile project. I am enjoying working in this way, and can see many of the benefits over some of the previous waterfall projects I have worked on.

                                However, we haven't all had formal training in the agile approach, but instead have picked this up from the other team members, some who have been on courses and fed back to the rest of the team. We also pick up a lot of knowledge from the retrospective such as what to keep doing or stop doing. I haven't yet been scrum master for a sprint, but there are several developers who have (as well as BAs and one of our testers). Therefore members of the team may have more knowledge of agile than others, but I don't know if this could be detrimental to the sprint or not.

                                Do you think that every team member therefore have some form of formal agile training, or even scrum master training? Or do you feel it is sufficient to pick it up from the rest of the team?

                                Thanks

                                Emma



                                 

                                 



                                 

                                --
                                Wouter Lagerweij         | wouter@...

                                 

                              • Emma Garland
                                Thanks everyone for your replies. I took a lot from the answers, and fed back to my team who took on board all the replies. I think essentially it is apparent
                                Message 15 of 17 , Oct 3, 2011
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                                  Thanks everyone for your replies. I took a lot from the answers, and fed back to my team who took on board all the replies.

                                  I think essentially it is apparent that we need more agile training, to establish a common vocabulary, and make sure everyone is up to scratch with scrum. It was also an interesting idea to have a team library and to get a consultant in to train us for a few days. I summarized the main points and look forward to us rolling out some of the ideas over the coming sprints.

                                  Thanks
                                  Emma

                                • Emma Garland
                                  Thanks everyone for your replies. I took a lot from the answers, and fed back to my team who took on board all the replies. I think essentially it is apparent
                                  Message 16 of 17 , Oct 3, 2011
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                                    Thanks everyone for your replies. I took a lot from the answers, and fed back to my team who took on board all the replies.

                                    I think essentially it is apparent that we need more agile training, to establish a common vocabulary, and make sure everyone is up to scratch with scrum. It was also an interesting idea to have a team library and to get a consultant in to train us for a few days. I summarized the main points and look forward to us rolling out some of the ideas over the coming sprints.

                                    Thanks
                                    Emma

                                  • mcleaper
                                    I really like door number 1 having a consultant come in and train everyone. Door number 2 has real disadvantages. I can t quote the studies off the top of
                                    Message 17 of 17 , Oct 3, 2011
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                                      I really like door number 1 " having a consultant" come in and train everyone. Door number 2 has real disadvantages. I can't quote the studies off the top of my head but I know that someone that goes to training only picks up a small % of that training and to compound that by having them train the others is not a real good solution. A good start is so important that I would highly suggest the best training that the company can reasonably afford.

                                      --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "JackM" <jack@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > The more folks that are trained the better. One way to accomplish this is to have a consultant come in. Or alternatively send one or two folks for training and have them train the rest of the group. I'd advise both scrum master and product owner training.
                                      >
                                      > Hope this helps
                                      > Jack
                                      > www.agilebuuddy.com
                                      >
                                      > --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "Emma G" <emmagarland77@> wrote:
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > > Hi
                                      > >
                                      > > I am a developer on an agile project. I am enjoying working in this way,
                                      > > and can see many of the benefits over some of the previous waterfall
                                      > > projects I have worked on.
                                      > >
                                      > > However, we haven't all had formal training in the agile approach, but
                                      > > instead have picked this up from the other team members, some who have
                                      > > been on courses and fed back to the rest of the team. We also pick up a
                                      > > lot of knowledge from the retrospective such as what to keep doing or
                                      > > stop doing. I haven't yet been scrum master for a sprint, but there are
                                      > > several developers who have (as well as BAs and one of our testers).
                                      > > Therefore members of the team may have more knowledge of agile than
                                      > > others, but I don't know if this could be detrimental to the sprint or
                                      > > not.
                                      > >
                                      > > Do you think that every team member therefore have some form of formal
                                      > > agile training, or even scrum master training? Or do you feel it is
                                      > > sufficient to pick it up from the rest of the team?
                                      > >
                                      > > Thanks
                                      > >
                                      > > Emma
                                      > >
                                      >
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