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plug-and-play ScrumMasters

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  • Jean Richardson
    I just had the oddest experience in a recruiting interaction for a ScrumMaster position. An agency had requested that they be allowed to include my
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 12, 2011
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      I just had the oddest experience in a recruiting interaction for a ScrumMaster position.  An agency had requested that they be allowed to include my credentials in a project they were bidding for a large local client some weeks ago.  I was familiar with their prospect and doing some ScrumMastering there seemed interesting as they have a rapidly expanding Scrum adoption in this large complex organization.

       

      Today I get a call informing me that the agency won the bid and wants me to complete the legal contracting paperwork and start on the project a week from Monday.  Notice the dearth of information about either the project or the Team, not mention that it was not clear whether a Product Owner had been identified—oh, and the project is date-driven.  There was *a little* more information provided, but disclosing it could compromise the agency, so I won’t do that here. 

       

      Only one developer has actually been committed so far; the rest will be recruited in the intervening week while the moves in from out of state, then we were to be consuming the backlog 3 days post start date and deliver all content to fulfill the contract within 4 sprints.  Hmmm.  The call from the agency’s engagement manager was focused on encouraging my rapid cooperation and sign up for this mystery project (it’s an integration project, but the agency doesn’t know what is actually being integrated) with the mystery team—on the strength of his 30 years in consulting and excellent judgment.

       

      I raised a number of questions including an interest in talking with the key stakeholders in the actual organization I’d be working in to get some sense of fit and a broader understanding of what the customer’s expectations are.  This was denied—flatly.  I also asked to talk to the one developer that had been hired; the request didn’t seem to compute.  I think we’re at an impasse at this point.  

       

      During the conversation with the agency, I had a sinking feeling that that their implementation of Scrum would fall out such that the ScrumMaster’s job would really be processing change orders on the contract and doing what I call “flogging the horses”---using various coercive tactics to get the Team to work harder, faster, and quality is in the eye of the beholder when the Devil holds the candle.

       

      Is this becoming a recognizable experience to others, as well?

       

        --- Jean

       

      gate.site.jpg


      Jean Richardson

      Azure Gate Consulting

      ~ Repatterning the Human Experience of Work

       

      AzureGate.net

      (503) 788-8998

      Jean@...

       

       

       

    • Malcolm Anderson
      Jean This looks to be worse than the Project Manager (pronounced Scrum Master ) position I had doing DOD research work for a major consulting firm. Expect to
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 12, 2011
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        Jean

        This looks to be worse than the Project Manager (pronounced "Scrum Master") position I had doing DOD research work for a major consulting firm.

        Expect to see a lot more of these type of positions in the coming years. 

        It's too bad that Ken didn't trademark and license the term "Scrum Master" so that we could have some kind of hygiene factor to control who is and is not a "Scrum Master"

        This sounds like it could be a great case study for you to write up.

        Greatest of Luck to you

        --

        Malcolm Anderson
        Scrum Coach & Agile Engineer




        On Fri, Aug 12, 2011 at 1:06 PM, Jean Richardson <jean@...> wrote:
         

        I just had the oddest experience in a recruiting interaction for a ScrumMaster position.  An agency had requested that they be allowed to include my credentials in a project they were bidding for a large local client some weeks ago.  I was familiar with their prospect and doing some ScrumMastering there seemed interesting as they have a rapidly expanding Scrum adoption in this large complex organization.

         

        Today I get a call informing me that the agency won the bid and wants me to complete the legal contracting paperwork and start on the project a week from Monday.  Notice the dearth of information about either the project or the Team, not mention that it was not clear whether a Product Owner had been identified—oh, and the project is date-driven.  There was *a little* more information provided, but disclosing it could compromise the agency, so I won’t do that here. 

         

        Only one developer has actually been committed so far; the rest will be recruited in the intervening week while the moves in from out of state, then we were to be consuming the backlog 3 days post start date and deliver all content to fulfill the contract within 4 sprints.  Hmmm.  The call from the agency’s engagement manager was focused on encouraging my rapid cooperation and sign up for this mystery project (it’s an integration project, but the agency doesn’t know what is actually being integrated) with the mystery team—on the strength of his 30 years in consulting and excellent judgment.

         

        I raised a number of questions including an interest in talking with the key stakeholders in the actual organization I’d be working in to get some sense of fit and a broader understanding of what the customer’s expectations are.  This was denied—flatly.  I also asked to talk to the one developer that had been hired; the request didn’t seem to compute.  I think we’re at an impasse at this point.  

         

        During the conversation with the agency, I had a sinking feeling that that their implementation of Scrum would fall out such that the ScrumMaster’s job would really be processing change orders on the contract and doing what I call “flogging the horses”---using various coercive tactics to get the Team to work harder, faster, and quality is in the eye of the beholder when the Devil holds the candle.

         

        Is this becoming a recognizable experience to others, as well?

         

          --- Jean

         

        gate.site.jpg


        Jean Richardson

        Azure Gate Consulting

        ~ Repatterning the Human Experience of Work

         

        AzureGate.net

        (503) 788-8998

        Jean@...

         

         

         




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