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Re: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Scrum for small teams

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  • Ajay Rawat
    Ok, I am sorry for having missed the original scenario. You are right in asking the question about feasibility. They will also have to see if the team can
    Message 1 of 9 , Jun 6, 2011
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      Ok, I am sorry for having missed the original scenario.
      You are right in asking the question about feasibility. They will also have to see if the team can priorities the three projects so that the team works on a single project at a time and one by one on the three projects.
      Thanks,
      Rawat.

      On Mon, Jun 6, 2011 at 5:17 PM, Cipson <cipson@...> wrote:
       

      Supriya asked:
      " Our developer team consists of 2 other developers. We have 3 main products that each of us developers mainly develops for"

      In case they are working on similar product (3 products) with 2 developers, all of them may form a single SCRUM Team.


      Regards
      Cipson Thomas



      On Mon, Jun 6, 2011 at 12:39 PM, Ajay Rawat <rawat.as@gmail.com> wrote:
       

      Of course QA members should be part of any Scrum team but wWhat do you mean by 3 products x 2 developers?
      Thanks,
      Rawat.
      On Mon, Jun 6, 2011 at 11:10 AM, Cipson <cipson@...> wrote:
       

      Do you have a QA Team ?
           If yes, make sure QA members also part of your SCRUM Team.

      Is it feasibile of  3 products x 2 developers + QA members form a single SCRUM Team ?


      Regards
      Cipson Thomas



      On Sun, Jun 5, 2011 at 4:40 AM, Miguel <micajeho@...> wrote:
       

      Hello
      I believe that some concept of SCRUM can be adopted in your context, but as he himself used to preach Scrum teams 5-9 developers, due to the fact that less than 5 you have a loss of views and it becomes more difficult to manage. My suggestion is that you adopt some agile concepts, but not exclusively from the scrum and with the growth of your team may consider adopting Scrum to their projects.
      Another factor that may weigh in their decisions is the fact of working with various products. I have been through an experience like this and I guarantee that there is room for more than one product at a backlog.
      The question you should ask yourself is: What is the real gain I'll be using Scrum.

      Hope this helps



      --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Michael James <mj4scrum@...> wrote:
      >
      > This question made me think back to the time our team first tried doing Scrum. We can talk about sooner delivery, quality, ROI, and all that. But I think the secret reason most of us get excited about Agile approaches is that they're more fun.
      >
      > A good way to approach the one-team / many products situation would be to use one Product Backlog so it's clear to everyone what the priorities and sequence of delivery are. Go with 1 or 2 week iterations with real review and retrospectives at the end of each. If there's a habit of working separately, suggest everyone swarm on one or two items at a time, getting them completely done before starting new ones. It's possible your official project manager title may reduce the tendency of the other team members to manage each other. This doesn't make Scrum impossible, but I'd still consider renouncing it. I changed my title to "anti-architect" when I realized the whole team was better at design than I was individually. Theater improv classes helped me change some of my anti-collaborative habits; I'd recommend it for anyone interested in Scrum.
      >
      > --mj
      > http://ScrumReferenceCard.com
      >
      > On Jun 4, 2011, at 7:32 AM, Wouter Lagerweij wrote:
      >
      > > Hi,
      > >
      > >
      > > Scrum can certainly work well for a small team. You should look at what you're currently doing, and decide on whether you want to try some different things.
      > >
      > > One of the core things that you would be doing differently is that all developers would work as a team. On all main products, and on the side projects. It's the team work that makes it work.
      > > As a project manager it could be interesting to think about it as follows: would it give your company more security if all developers can work on each product? And decreasing lead time for new features would be good for your customers, wouldn't it?
      > >
      > > A slightly larger team probably has more profit from Scrum's communication structures, but if you start working together as a team, I'm positive you'll get mucj improvement.
      > >
      > > Wouter
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > On Thu, Jun 2, 2011 at 9:31 PM, superartsy <supriya@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > I am a Sr Developer + Project Manager of a small team. Our developer team consists of 2 other developers. We have 3 main products that each of us developers mainly develops for.Ours is not a project based company. Customers do not request projects. Customers may request features/enhancements that will them be delivered to all our customer base. That said, we do have side projects come up all the time, that may or maynot be related to the main product line.
      > > I am a newbie at SCRUM. I have read up a lot about it but never really tried implementing it for a team. One of the main reasons being,I am not sure if it is applicable and profitable to a small team that works on multiple independent projects.
      > >
      > > Any recommendations?
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > --
      > > Wouter Lagerweij | wouter@...

      > > http://www.lagerweij.com | @wouterla
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >





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