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Re: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Which average to use?

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  • Andrew Pham
    ... Hello Ron, Thanks for the questions... The first estimate was never the best one but after that and after some calibration, all the next estimates always
    Message 1 of 115 , May 10, 2011
      On Tue, May 10, 2011 at 6:40 PM, Ron Jeffries <ronjeffries@...> wrote:
       
      Hello, Andrew. On Tuesday, May 10, 2011, at 7:26:29 PM, you wrote:

      > I started to see the need for this type of estimation process a while back
      > when I was still on the other side of Agile as a vice president of software
      > development. Almost all of my project teams and myself took too long to
      > estimate and re-estimated and we never got it right nor the consensus...It
      > just so happened that when I needed to help the project team this time as a
      > coach that the process had been formalized and the team was able to use it
      > successfully to get their estimate to be accepted...

      But was it correct?

      Hello Ron,

      Thanks for the questions...

      The first estimate was never the best one but after that and after some calibration, all the next estimates always fell within range. Once or twice, the process even helped prove that the team was over-committed, before and after the fact...

      And anyway, the essence of Agile is to set budget in dollars and
      time and steer the project to deliver the best combination of
      features within those constraints.

      Formal estimation, even if it worked, and as far as I've seen it
      rarely if ever does, violates a number of the "spirit" points of
      Agile and Scrum. I'm troubled by that.

      My objective criteria-based estimation process actually helps teams obtain consensus and better collaborate to achieve tangible results...

      Andrew
      Agile and Lean Coach, Author of Scrum in Action
      http://www.amazon.com/Scrum-Action-1st-Ed-ebook/dp/B004NNV72A/ref=tmm_kin_title_0?ie=UTF8&m=AG56TWVU5XWC2&qid=1304436191&sr=1-1



      Ron Jeffries
      www.XProgramming.com
      Accroche toi a ton reve. --ELO


    • And Gon
      Hi, I think that what is important is to know your average velocity and estimate taking that into account. In our case we know, by average, that we deliver 70%
      Message 115 of 115 , May 16, 2011
        Hi,
        I think that what is important is to know your average velocity and estimate taking that into account. In our case we know, by average, that we deliver 70% of what we put in our Sprint Backlog but we keep adding more stories as sometimes the team delivers more than the 70%. The team is not demoralized at the end of the sprint when just 70% is delivered and when we get to 90% is a great sprint. This 30% usually goes on unexpected tasks that are very common in our case.
        In addition the team has some "freedom time" so they can investigate and learn new things that they want. I think this formula is working for us.

        Regards,

        --
        Andoni
        www.iatriple.net
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