Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Scrum Guide interpretation - Duration is not considered in Scrum

Expand Messages
  • strazhce
    Hi. In Scrum Guide there is a paragraph: Sprint Backlog Burndown is a graph of the amount of Sprint Backlog work remaining in a Sprint across time in the
    Message 1 of 87 , Apr 21, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi.

      In Scrum Guide there is a paragraph:

      Sprint Backlog Burndown is a graph of the amount of Sprint Backlog work remaining in a Sprint across time in the Sprint. To create this graph, determine how much work remains by summing the backlog estimates every day of the Sprint. The amount of work remaining for a Sprint is the sum of the work remaining for all of Sprint Backlog. Keep track of these sums by day and use them to create a graph that shows the work remaining over time. By drawing a line through the points on the graph, the Team can manage its progress in completing a Sprint’s work. Duration is not considered in Scrum. Work remaining and date are the only variables of interest.

      One line interests me: Duration is not considered in Scrum.

      What does it mean?

      I don't say my interpretations, because I don't want to pollute the discussion with those. Probably later :)

      Thanks.
      Oleg
    • strazhce
      Hi, Adam, ... So if I start using Scrum/Agile/whatever without coach, I undertake a risk of doing it wrong. If I hire a coach/mentor, I pay for avoiding most
      Message 87 of 87 , May 4, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi, Adam,

        --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Adam Sroka <adam.sroka@...> wrote:
        >
        > In my opinion it is not the responsibility of the coach to do these things
        > per se. Rather, an experienced coach can help guide an organization to do
        > these things successfully based on his experience.
        >
        > You don't hire sherpas to climb the mountain for you. You hire them for
        > their knowledge of the terrain and its various perils so that *you* can
        > climb the mountain in relative safety. A coach is a very similar thing.
        >
        > Also similarly, the ultimate success or failure of the expedition is not the
        > sole responsibility of the sherpa, but most experienced climbers recognize
        > that it is irresponsible to proceed without his assistance.
        > On May 3, 2011 5:30 AM, "strazhce" <infobox.oleg@...> wrote:

        So if I start using Scrum/Agile/whatever without coach, I undertake a risk of doing it wrong. If I hire a coach/mentor, I pay for avoiding most common mistakes other people made and speeding up my change, for opening my eyes to see things I wouldn't come across otherwise. It seems similar to taking or not taking personal/career coach.

        Ok, I've thought about some implications (http://www.agileskillsproject.com/collected-knowledge/ideas-to-refine/hiring-agile-coach). My main concern is trusting the coach, but it is a different topic.

        Thanks Adam.

        Oleg
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.