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Is Facebook a Scrum Shop?

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  • jens.meydam
    I ve posted a case study on Facebook: People x Process - How Facebook Became the Hottest Company on the Planet
    Message 1 of 27 , Mar 17, 2011
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      I've posted a case study on Facebook:

      People x Process -
      How Facebook Became the Hottest Company on the Planet

      http://www.limitedwipsociety.ch/en/case-study.html

      This is purely based on research (I have no connections with Facebook), so take it with a grain of salt.

      Having said that, much of the case study is based on primary sources, and I have received approving comments from one of the best sources.

      While this is not about Scrum in the narrow sense, there is a lot in there that is very close to Scrum.

      There are lots of links to presentations, interviews, etc. that make good examples for what Scrum is meant to achieve, for example strong product leadership, self-organization, and cross functional teams that take pride in their work.

      It's also a kind of reality check: Whatever Facebook does /not/ do that is prescribed in Scrum - not doing that hasn't prevented Facebook from being wildly successful, so perhaps it isn't really that important, or it's dependent on context. (The same goes for XP.)

      Don't miss the comments by Don Reinertsen, Alistair Cockburn and Jeff Sutherland at the end.

      Jeff Sutherland has written a blogpost

      http://scrum.jeffsutherland.com/2011/03/hackathon-how-its-done-at-facebook.html

      and linked to two of the videos:

      http://vimeo.com/6220145
      http://www.time.com/time/video/player/0,32068,712448402001_2037228,00.html

      Cheers,
      Jens
    • Alan Dayley
      It s also a kind of reality check: Whatever Facebook does /not/ do that is prescribed in Scrum - not doing that hasn t prevented Facebook from being wildly
      Message 2 of 27 , Mar 17, 2011
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        "It's also a kind of reality check: Whatever Facebook does /not/ do that is prescribed in Scrum - not doing that hasn't prevented Facebook from being wildly successful, so perhaps it isn't really that important, or it's dependent on context. (The same goes for XP.)"

        It is also possible to be wildly successful doing waterfall, so perhaps all of Agile isn't really that important, or it's dependent on context.

        Alan


        On Thu, Mar 17, 2011 at 2:14 PM, jens.meydam <jens.meydam@...> wrote:
         

        I've posted a case study on Facebook:

        People x Process -
        How Facebook Became the Hottest Company on the Planet

        http://www.limitedwipsociety.ch/en/case-study.html

        This is purely based on research (I have no connections with Facebook), so take it with a grain of salt.

        Having said that, much of the case study is based on primary sources, and I have received approving comments from one of the best sources.

        While this is not about Scrum in the narrow sense, there is a lot in there that is very close to Scrum.

        There are lots of links to presentations, interviews, etc. that make good examples for what Scrum is meant to achieve, for example strong product leadership, self-organization, and cross functional teams that take pride in their work.

        It's also a kind of reality check: Whatever Facebook does /not/ do that is prescribed in Scrum - not doing that hasn't prevented Facebook from being wildly successful, so perhaps it isn't really that important, or it's dependent on context. (The same goes for XP.)

        Don't miss the comments by Don Reinertsen, Alistair Cockburn and Jeff Sutherland at the end.

        Jeff Sutherland has written a blogpost

        http://scrum.jeffsutherland.com/2011/03/hackathon-how-its-done-at-facebook.html

        and linked to two of the videos:

        http://vimeo.com/6220145
        http://www.time.com/time/video/player/0,32068,712448402001_2037228,00.html

        Cheers,
        Jens


      • jens.meydam
        ... Depending who you are competing against, in what market. Against Facebook - or any fast-moving start-up? Good luck. Check out what happened to their
        Message 3 of 27 , Mar 17, 2011
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          > It is also possible to be wildly successful doing waterfall

          Depending who you are competing against, in what market.

          Against Facebook - or any fast-moving start-up? Good luck. Check out what happened to their competition.

          I mean, this is the scenario that Scrum is more or less made for.

          Jens
        • Alan Dayley
          ... Exactly. I think it is a mistake to take one company s experience and extrapolate that maybe Scrum (or Agile or Waterfall or ...) is broken. I like the
          Message 4 of 27 , Mar 17, 2011
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            On Thu, Mar 17, 2011 at 3:47 PM, jens.meydam <jens.meydam@...> wrote:
             
            > It is also possible to be wildly successful doing waterfall

            Depending who you are competing against, in what market.

             
            Exactly.  I think it is a mistake to take one company's experience and extrapolate that maybe Scrum (or Agile or Waterfall or ...) is broken.

            I like the article and the documentation it provides.

            Alan

          • Michael James
            ... Yes. While I don t like Zuckerberg or facebook, it s foolish to ignore someone creating a $50B company where others have failed. I read a baby was named
            Message 5 of 27 , Mar 17, 2011
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              On Mar 17, 2011, at 6:42 PM, Alan Dayley wrote:

              > Exactly. I think it is a mistake to take one company's experience and extrapolate that maybe Scrum (or Agile or Waterfall or ...) is broken.
              >
              > I like the article and the documentation it provides.

              Yes. While I don't like Zuckerberg or facebook, it's foolish to ignore someone creating a $50B company where others have failed. I read a baby was named "Facebook" in Egypt. I don't think anyone will name their babies "Scrum," or "Lean" -- except maybe that Jack Sprat guy.

              I enjoyed the article's explanation of facebook's success through the lens of Lean principles. Scrum is just one possible pathway to the kind of agility facebook has demonstrated through its own ambitious ingenuity.

              --mj
              http://ScrumReferenceCard.com
            • Kurt Häusler
              ... We named our daughter Cadence. It was the only software process related word that my wife would accept.
              Message 6 of 27 , Mar 18, 2011
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                On Fri, Mar 18, 2011 at 7:39 AM, Michael James <mj4scrum@...> wrote:
                 

                On Mar 17, 2011, at 6:42 PM, Alan Dayley wrote:

                > Exactly. I think it is a mistake to take one company's experience and extrapolate that maybe Scrum (or Agile or Waterfall or ...) is broken.
                >
                > I like the article and the documentation it provides.

                Yes. While I don't like Zuckerberg or facebook, it's foolish to ignore someone creating a $50B company where others have failed. I read a baby was named "Facebook" in Egypt. I don't think anyone will name their babies "Scrum," or "Lean" -- except maybe that Jack Sprat guy.

                We named our daughter Cadence. It was the only software process related word that my wife would accept. 
              • woynam
                Kanban has a nice ring to it. :-)
                Message 7 of 27 , Mar 18, 2011
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                  Kanban has a nice ring to it. :-)

                  --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Kurt Häusler <kurt.haeusler@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > On Fri, Mar 18, 2011 at 7:39 AM, Michael James <mj4scrum@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > On Mar 17, 2011, at 6:42 PM, Alan Dayley wrote:
                  > >
                  > > > Exactly. I think it is a mistake to take one company's experience and
                  > > extrapolate that maybe Scrum (or Agile or Waterfall or ...) is broken.
                  > > >
                  > > > I like the article and the documentation it provides.
                  > >
                  > > Yes. While I don't like Zuckerberg or facebook, it's foolish to ignore
                  > > someone creating a $50B company where others have failed. I read a baby was
                  > > named "Facebook" in Egypt. I don't think anyone will name their babies
                  > > "Scrum," or "Lean" -- except maybe that Jack Sprat guy.
                  > >
                  >
                  > We named our daughter Cadence. It was the only software process related word
                  > that my wife would accept.
                  >
                • jens.meydam
                  Hi Alan, OK! And don t get me wrong: It was not my intention to take a cheap shot at Scrum (or XP). It has probably escaped you that I posted a link to a video
                  Message 8 of 27 , Mar 18, 2011
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                    Hi Alan,

                    OK!

                    And don't get me wrong: It was not my intention to take a cheap shot at Scrum (or XP).

                    It has probably escaped you that I posted a link to a video showing a Scrum team at Facebook - working on one of the most high-profile parts of the user interface. I guess that's good news for the Scrum community, even though such teams are probably still an exception at Facebook.

                    What I find even more intriguing, though, is to try to map aspects of their culture to Scrum that, at a first glance, have nothing to do with it.

                    For example, they have "hackathons" at Facebook - all-night coding events where engineers and designers can work on whatever they like. Many of Facebook's features have started as hackathon projects. Zuckerberg is in close touch with the development staff and can react quickly if he sees a promising idea.

                    One way to interprete that part of their culture is that hackathons are a way for Facebook staff to get something on the backlog.

                    Before an idea is proven in code, it is probably not taken seriously. If Facebook staff manage to create a promising prototype, however, Zuckerberg (the Product Owner) may put this on the fast track (prioritize it in the backlog). Hackathons give an opportunity to Facebook staff to create those prototypes.

                    Just as interesting as the parallels to Scrum are the differences. How much value do we attach to rules? Do we, as the Scrum community, define ourselves by the rules of the Scrum Guide or by the dynamics the Scrum patterns are meant to create?

                    Cheers,
                    Jens

                    --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Alan Dayley <alandd@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > On Thu, Mar 17, 2011 at 3:47 PM, jens.meydam <jens.meydam@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > >
                    > > > It is also possible to be wildly successful doing waterfall
                    > >
                    > > Depending who you are competing against, in what market.
                    > >
                    > >
                    > Exactly. I think it is a mistake to take one company's experience and
                    > extrapolate that maybe Scrum (or Agile or Waterfall or ...) is broken.
                    >
                    > I like the article and the documentation it provides.
                    >
                    > Alan
                    >
                  • Stephen Bobick
                    For example, they have hackathons at Facebook - all-night coding events where engineers and designers can work on whatever they like. Many of Facebook s
                    Message 9 of 27 , Mar 18, 2011
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                      "For example, they have "hackathons" at Facebook - all-night coding events where engineers and designers can work on whatever they like. Many of Facebook's features have started as hackathon projects. Zuckerberg is in close touch with the development staff and can react quickly if he sees a promising idea. "

                      That's what I always wanted as a developer ... working allnighters on salary.



                      On Fri, Mar 18, 2011 at 2:36 PM, jens.meydam <jens.meydam@...> wrote:
                       



                      Hi Alan,

                      OK!

                      And don't get me wrong: It was not my intention to take a cheap shot at Scrum (or XP).

                      It has probably escaped you that I posted a link to a video showing a Scrum team at Facebook - working on one of the most high-profile parts of the user interface. I guess that's good news for the Scrum community, even though such teams are probably still an exception at Facebook.

                      What I find even more intriguing, though, is to try to map aspects of their culture to Scrum that, at a first glance, have nothing to do with it.

                      For example, they have "hackathons" at Facebook - all-night coding events where engineers and designers can work on whatever they like. Many of Facebook's features have started as hackathon projects. Zuckerberg is in close touch with the development staff and can react quickly if he sees a promising idea.

                      One way to interprete that part of their culture is that hackathons are a way for Facebook staff to get something on the backlog.

                      Before an idea is proven in code, it is probably not taken seriously. If Facebook staff manage to create a promising prototype, however, Zuckerberg (the Product Owner) may put this on the fast track (prioritize it in the backlog). Hackathons give an opportunity to Facebook staff to create those prototypes.

                      Just as interesting as the parallels to Scrum are the differences. How much value do we attach to rules? Do we, as the Scrum community, define ourselves by the rules of the Scrum Guide or by the dynamics the Scrum patterns are meant to create?

                      Cheers,
                      Jens

                      --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Alan Dayley <alandd@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > On Thu, Mar 17, 2011 at 3:47 PM, jens.meydam <jens.meydam@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > >
                      > > > It is also possible to be wildly successful doing waterfall
                      > >
                      > > Depending who you are competing against, in what market.
                      > >
                      > >
                      > Exactly. I think it is a mistake to take one company's experience and
                      > extrapolate that maybe Scrum (or Agile or Waterfall or ...) is broken.
                      >
                      > I like the article and the documentation it provides.
                      >
                      > Alan
                      >


                    • Alan Dayley
                      It is an interesting story with a great deal for learning. Thanks for writing it! The Agile principles can be instilled in different ways. I think Scrum is a
                      Message 10 of 27 , Mar 18, 2011
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                        It is an interesting story with a great deal for learning.  Thanks for writing it!

                        The Agile principles can be instilled in different ways.  I think Scrum is a good way to help people quickly begin active learning of Agile principles, even when they don't yet know that is what they are doing.  That is part if it's value and part of a pitfall if people "doing Scrum" don't ever make the transition to "being Agile."

                        Facebook seems to have achieved a significant measure of "being Agile" on their own path.  More power to them!

                        Alan

                        On Fri, Mar 18, 2011 at 2:36 PM, jens.meydam <jens.meydam@...> wrote:
                         



                        Hi Alan,

                        OK!

                        And don't get me wrong: It was not my intention to take a cheap shot at Scrum (or XP).

                        It has probably escaped you that I posted a link to a video showing a Scrum team at Facebook - working on one of the most high-profile parts of the user interface. I guess that's good news for the Scrum community, even though such teams are probably still an exception at Facebook.

                        What I find even more intriguing, though, is to try to map aspects of their culture to Scrum that, at a first glance, have nothing to do with it.

                        For example, they have "hackathons" at Facebook - all-night coding events where engineers and designers can work on whatever they like. Many of Facebook's features have started as hackathon projects. Zuckerberg is in close touch with the development staff and can react quickly if he sees a promising idea.

                        One way to interprete that part of their culture is that hackathons are a way for Facebook staff to get something on the backlog.

                        Before an idea is proven in code, it is probably not taken seriously. If Facebook staff manage to create a promising prototype, however, Zuckerberg (the Product Owner) may put this on the fast track (prioritize it in the backlog). Hackathons give an opportunity to Facebook staff to create those prototypes.

                        Just as interesting as the parallels to Scrum are the differences. How much value do we attach to rules? Do we, as the Scrum community, define ourselves by the rules of the Scrum Guide or by the dynamics the Scrum patterns are meant to create?

                        Cheers,
                        Jens

                        --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Alan Dayley <alandd@...> wrote:


                        >
                        > On Thu, Mar 17, 2011 at 3:47 PM, jens.meydam <jens.meydam@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > >
                        > > > It is also possible to be wildly successful doing waterfall
                        > >
                        > > Depending who you are competing against, in what market.
                        > >
                        > >
                        > Exactly. I think it is a mistake to take one company's experience and
                        > extrapolate that maybe Scrum (or Agile or Waterfall or ...) is broken.
                        >
                        > I like the article and the documentation it provides.
                        >
                        > Alan
                        >


                      • jens.meydam
                        ... And then consider the perks: http://www.quora.com/What-are-all-the-perks-that-Facebook-employees-get 14th point: Being paid to be on Facebook all day
                        Message 11 of 27 , Mar 19, 2011
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                          > That's what I always wanted as a developer ... working allnighters on
                          > salary.

                          :-)

                          And then consider the perks:

                          http://www.quora.com/What-are-all-the-perks-that-Facebook-employees-get

                          14th point: "Being paid to be on Facebook all day"

                          Cheers
                          Jens
                        • Dan
                          That s what I always wanted as a developer ... working allnighters on salary. Anyone with this type of work ethic wouldn t last at a shop like Facebook. A
                          Message 12 of 27 , Mar 19, 2011
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                            "That's what I always wanted as a developer ... working allnighters on
                            salary."

                            Anyone with this type of work ethic wouldn't last at a shop like Facebook. A shop like that is very competitive and draws the cream of the crop. I am sure the developers at Facebook are well compensated and happy to work in an environment where innovation and creativity are not only encouraged but well rewarded.

                            To each his own...

                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > On Fri, Mar 18, 2011 at 2:36 PM, jens.meydam <jens.meydam@...> wrote:

                            > >
                            > > Hi Alan,
                            > >
                            > > OK!
                            > >
                            > > And don't get me wrong: It was not my intention to take a cheap shot at
                            > > Scrum (or XP).
                            > >
                            > > It has probably escaped you that I posted a link to a video showing a Scrum
                            > > team at Facebook - working on one of the most high-profile parts of the user
                            > > interface. I guess that's good news for the Scrum community, even though
                            > > such teams are probably still an exception at Facebook.
                            > >
                            > > What I find even more intriguing, though, is to try to map aspects of their
                            > > culture to Scrum that, at a first glance, have nothing to do with it.
                            > >
                            > > For example, they have "hackathons" at Facebook - all-night coding events
                            > > where engineers and designers can work on whatever they like. Many of
                            > > Facebook's features have started as hackathon projects. Zuckerberg is in
                            > > close touch with the development staff and can react quickly if he sees a
                            > > promising idea.
                            > >
                            > > One way to interprete that part of their culture is that hackathons are a
                            > > way for Facebook staff to get something on the backlog.
                            > >
                            > > Before an idea is proven in code, it is probably not taken seriously. If
                            > > Facebook staff manage to create a promising prototype, however, Zuckerberg
                            > > (the Product Owner) may put this on the fast track (prioritize it in the
                            > > backlog). Hackathons give an opportunity to Facebook staff to create those
                            > > prototypes.
                            > >
                            > > Just as interesting as the parallels to Scrum are the differences. How much
                            > > value do we attach to rules? Do we, as the Scrum community, define ourselves
                            > > by the rules of the Scrum Guide or by the dynamics the Scrum patterns are
                            > > meant to create?
                            > >
                            > > Cheers,
                            > > Jens
                            > >
                            > > --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Alan Dayley <alandd@> wrote:
                            > > >
                            > > > On Thu, Mar 17, 2011 at 3:47 PM, jens.meydam <jens.meydam@> wrote:
                            > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > > > It is also possible to be wildly successful doing waterfall
                            > > > >
                            > > > > Depending who you are competing against, in what market.
                            > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > Exactly. I think it is a mistake to take one company's experience and
                            > > > extrapolate that maybe Scrum (or Agile or Waterfall or ...) is broken.
                            > > >
                            > > > I like the article and the documentation it provides.
                            > > >
                            > > > Alan
                            > > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            >
                          • jens.meydam
                            P.S. One point where Facebook is close to Scrum (or common Scrum practice) yet subtly different is their obsession with speed. Many Scrum coaches put great
                            Message 13 of 27 , Mar 19, 2011
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                              P.S.

                              One point where Facebook is close to Scrum (or common Scrum practice) yet subtly different is their obsession with speed.

                              Many Scrum coaches put great emphasis on velocity, that is story points (or whatever unit you prefer) per Sprint. The software is commonly installed in the production environment only after the Sprint review, or even much later, depending on the release cycle.

                              In contrast, in his presentation Robert Johnson, one of the Directors of Engineering, emphasizes fast cycle time in order to get fast feedback. At Facebook, front-end changes are released to production daily (or even several times a day), back-end changes weekly, if I remember correctly. This gives a lot of slots for releasing features and feature changes as soon as they are done. Risky changes and big UI changes like the new profile page require more coordination and planning, obviously.

                              There is a slight conflict between these two kinds of "speed" - I get faster cycle time with more slack capacity, but that leads to less than optimal velocity (= throughput).

                              Jens


                              > What I find even more intriguing, though, is to try to map aspects of their culture to Scrum that, at a first glance, have nothing to do with it.
                              >
                              > For example, they have "hackathons" at Facebook - all-night coding events where engineers and designers can work on whatever they like. Many of Facebook's features have started as hackathon projects. Zuckerberg is in close touch with the development staff and can react quickly if he sees a promising idea.
                              >
                              > One way to interprete that part of their culture is that hackathons are a way for Facebook staff to get something on the backlog.
                              >
                              > Before an idea is proven in code, it is probably not taken seriously. If Facebook staff manage to create a promising prototype, however, Zuckerberg (the Product Owner) may put this on the fast track (prioritize it in the backlog). Hackathons give an opportunity to Facebook staff to create those prototypes.
                              >
                              > Just as interesting as the parallels to Scrum are the differences. How much value do we attach to rules? Do we, as the Scrum community, define ourselves by the rules of the Scrum Guide or by the dynamics the Scrum patterns are meant to create?
                            • jens.meydam
                              A few days ago I gave a presentation on this topic. http://www.slideshare.net/jmeydam/facebook-and-scrum Preliminary conclusion: The development process at
                              Message 14 of 27 , Jul 8, 2011
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                                A few days ago I gave a presentation on this topic.

                                http://www.slideshare.net/jmeydam/facebook-and-scrum

                                Preliminary conclusion: The development process at Facebook has striking parallels to Scrum as described by Takeuchi and Nonaka. (Parallels to "prescriptive Scrum": not so much.)

                                What are your thoughts on this?

                                Cheers,

                                Jens
                              • Mark Levison
                                I only just saw this post. On Sat, Mar 19, 2011 at 6:33 PM, jens.meydam ... Really that doesn t seem healthy. Can you name these
                                Message 15 of 27 , Jul 8, 2011
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                                  I only just saw this post.

                                  On Sat, Mar 19, 2011 at 6:33 PM, jens.meydam <jens.meydam@...> 

                                  One point where Facebook is close to Scrum (or common Scrum practice) yet subtly different is their obsession with speed.

                                  Many Scrum coaches put great emphasis on velocity, that is story points (or whatever unit you prefer) per Sprint. The software is commonly installed in the production environment only after the Sprint review, or even much later, depending on the release cycle.


                                  Really that doesn't seem healthy. Can you name these coaches so we can help them recover :-) Seriously velocity is only useful as a planning tool, we just 20 minutes in a CSM class discussing all the problems with using it for anything more. If you find Scrum Trainers/Coaches putting more emphasis on velocity please send them here for "re-education" :-) 

                                  I think its healthy to have focus on delivering value to the customer sooner. All other activities should be subordinated to this. To this end in environments where they're not releasing at the end of every sprint (or more frequently) I post a cumulative flow diagram in the team area that emphasizes the "accepted" work that hasn't been deployed.

                                  Cheers
                                  Mark Levison

                                  MarkMark Levison | Agile Pain Relief Consulting | Certified Scrum Trainer
                                  Agile Editor @ InfoQ | Blog | Twitter | Office: (613) 862-2538
                                  Recent Entries:
                                  Story Slicing How Small is Small Enough, Why use an Agile Coach


                                  In contrast, in his presentation Robert Johnson, one of the Directors of Engineering, emphasizes fast cycle time in order to get fast feedback. At Facebook, front-end changes are released to production daily (or even several times a day), back-end changes weekly, if I remember correctly. This gives a lot of slots for releasing features and feature changes as soon as they are done. Risky changes and big UI changes like the new profile page require more coordination and planning, obviously.

                                  There is a slight conflict between these two kinds of "speed" - I get faster cycle time with more slack capacity, but that leads to less than optimal velocity (= throughput).

                                  Jens



                                  > What I find even more intriguing, though, is to try to map aspects of their culture to Scrum that, at a first glance, have nothing to do with it.
                                  >
                                  > For example, they have "hackathons" at Facebook - all-night coding events where engineers and designers can work on whatever they like. Many of Facebook's features have started as hackathon projects. Zuckerberg is in close touch with the development staff and can react quickly if he sees a promising idea.
                                  >
                                  > One way to interprete that part of their culture is that hackathons are a way for Facebook staff to get something on the backlog.
                                  >
                                  > Before an idea is proven in code, it is probably not taken seriously. If Facebook staff manage to create a promising prototype, however, Zuckerberg (the Product Owner) may put this on the fast track (prioritize it in the backlog). Hackathons give an opportunity to Facebook staff to create those prototypes.
                                  >
                                  > Just as interesting as the parallels to Scrum are the differences. How much value do we attach to rules? Do we, as the Scrum community, define ourselves by the rules of the Scrum Guide or by the dynamics the Scrum patterns are meant to create?


                                • jens.meydam
                                  Hi Mark, ... Thanks for posting your thoughts on this! So I guess we are in agreement here. This emphasis on rapid deployment is not yet quite mainstream,
                                  Message 16 of 27 , Jul 8, 2011
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                                    Hi Mark,

                                    > > Many Scrum coaches put great emphasis on velocity, that is story points (or
                                    > > whatever unit you prefer) per Sprint. The software is commonly installed in
                                    > > the production environment only after the Sprint review, or even much later,
                                    > > depending on the release cycle.
                                    > Really that doesn't seem healthy. Can you name these coaches so we can help
                                    > them recover :-) [...]
                                    > I think its healthy to have focus on delivering value to the customer
                                    > sooner. All other activities should be subordinated to this. To this end in
                                    > environments where they're not releasing at the end of every sprint (or more
                                    > frequently) I post a cumulative flow diagram in the team area that
                                    > emphasizes the "accepted" work that hasn't been deployed.

                                    Thanks for posting your thoughts on this!

                                    So I guess we are in agreement here. This emphasis on rapid deployment is not yet quite mainstream, though, as far as I can see.

                                    By the way, I got a lot of benefit out of using cumulative flow diagrams myself.

                                    If anybody is looking for instructions on how to do this, here's a link to a great blog post:

                                    http://hakanforss.wordpress.com/2011/06/17/cumulative-flow-diagram-how-to-create-one-in-excel-2010/

                                    Cheers,

                                    Jens
                                  • Michael James
                                    ... +1 (a relative unit). Any time I have participants obsessing over velocity and burndown charts I suspect they are missing the bigger picture. Regarding
                                    Message 17 of 27 , Jul 8, 2011
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                                      On Jul 8, 2011, at 1:47 PM, Mark Levison wrote:

                                      Seriously velocity is only useful as a planning tool, we just 20 minutes in a CSM class discussing all the problems with using it for anything more.

                                      +1 (a relative unit).  Any time I have participants obsessing over velocity and burndown charts I suspect they are missing the bigger picture.  

                                      Regarding Facebook, I'm pretty sure everyone knows Scrum is only one way to be agile.

                                      --mj


                                    • Ron Jeffries
                                      ... Well, except for many of the CSTs and the people they train ... :) But what s worse is that people want to be Agile or do Scrum. Being effective would be
                                      Message 18 of 27 , Jul 8, 2011
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                                        Hello, Michael. On Friday, July 8, 2011, at 5:21:20 PM, you wrote:

                                        > Regarding Facebook, I'm pretty sure everyone knows Scrum is only
                                        > one way to be agile.

                                        Well, except for many of the CSTs and the people they train ... :)

                                        But what's worse is that people want to be Agile or do Scrum. Being
                                        effective would be much better.

                                        Ron Jeffries
                                        www.XProgramming.com
                                        I cannot find my duck.
                                      • jens.meydam
                                        ... Still, it is interesting to look for parallels to Scrum. Who knows, we might learn something. :-)
                                        Message 19 of 27 , Jul 8, 2011
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                                          > Regarding Facebook, I'm pretty sure everyone knows Scrum is only one way to be agile.

                                          Still, it is interesting to look for parallels to Scrum.

                                          Who knows, we might learn something. :-)
                                        • jens.meydam
                                          Hi Ron, ... Which is why I find it a promising approach to look at really successful shops and to try to understand how they work. Cheers, Jens
                                          Message 20 of 27 , Jul 8, 2011
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                                            Hi Ron,

                                            > But what's worse is that people want to be Agile or do Scrum. Being
                                            > effective would be much better.

                                            Which is why I find it a promising approach to look at really successful shops and to try to understand how they work.

                                            Cheers,

                                            Jens
                                          • Mark Levison
                                            ... Its funny I opened a CSM training 3 days ago with this sentence: All that matters is that you deliver value with high quality to customer frequently and
                                            Message 21 of 27 , Jul 8, 2011
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                                              On Fri, Jul 8, 2011 at 5:33 PM, Ron Jeffries <ronjeffries@...> wrote:
                                               

                                              Hello, Michael. On Friday, July 8, 2011, at 5:21:20 PM, you wrote:

                                              > Regarding Facebook, I'm pretty sure everyone knows Scrum is only
                                              > one way to be agile.

                                              Well, except for many of the CSTs and the people they train ... :)

                                              But what's worse is that people want to be Agile or do Scrum. Being
                                              effective would be much better.

                                              Its funny I opened a CSM training 3 days ago with this sentence: "All that matters is that you deliver value with high quality to customer frequently and seek to improve". I suggested that one sentence (ok a run on sentence) got the core of it across and now they should ready.  

                                              Cheers
                                              Mark Levison

                                              MarkMark Levison | Agile Pain Relief Consulting | Certified Scrum Trainer
                                              Agile Editor @ InfoQ | Blog | Twitter | Office: (613) 862-2538
                                              Recent Entries:
                                              Story Slicing How Small is Small Enough, Why use an Agile Coach


                                              Ron Jeffries
                                              www.XProgramming.com
                                              I cannot find my duck.


                                            • Bachan Anand
                                              Very interested in knowing who those CSTs . -Bachan Believes that people are essentially good.
                                              Message 22 of 27 , Jul 8, 2011
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                                                Very interested in knowing who those CSTs . 

                                                -Bachan 

                                                Believes that people are essentially good.

                                                On Jul 8, 2011, at 2:33 PM, Ron Jeffries <ronjeffries@...> wrote:

                                                 

                                                Hello, Michael. On Friday, July 8, 2011, at 5:21:20 PM, you wrote:

                                                > Regarding Facebook, I'm pretty sure everyone knows Scrum is only
                                                > one way to be agile.

                                                Well, except for many of the CSTs and the people they train ... :)

                                                But what's worse is that people want to be Agile or do Scrum. Being
                                                effective would be much better.

                                                Ron Jeffries
                                                www.XProgramming.com
                                                I cannot find my duck.

                                              • jens.meydam
                                                A bit off-topic, but have a look at those charts by Kent Beck (currently working for Facebook, by the way): Frequent deployment is still far from being
                                                Message 23 of 27 , Jul 9, 2011
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                                                  A bit off-topic, but have a look at those charts by Kent Beck (currently working for Facebook, by the way): Frequent deployment is still far from being mainstream.

                                                  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KIkUWG5ACFY&feature=youtu.be
                                                • Ron Jeffries
                                                  Hello, Bachan. On Saturday, July 9, 2011, at 2:08:22 AM, you ... Mere sarcasm, Bachan. You may rest easy. Ron Jeffries www.XProgramming.com Hope is not a
                                                  Message 24 of 27 , Jul 9, 2011
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                                                    Hello, Bachan. On Saturday, July 9, 2011, at 2:08:22 AM, you
                                                    wrote:

                                                    > Very interested in knowing who those CSTs .

                                                    Mere sarcasm, Bachan. You may rest easy.

                                                    Ron Jeffries
                                                    www.XProgramming.com
                                                    Hope is not a strategy. -- Michael Henos
                                                  • Michael James
                                                    ... Ron, I still haven t met any CSTs who claim Scrum is the only way to be agile, or that agility is more important than effectiveness. If you haven t
                                                    Message 25 of 27 , Jul 11, 2011
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                                                      On Jul 9, 2011, at 4:57 AM, Ron Jeffries wrote:

                                                      > Hello, Bachan. On Saturday, July 9, 2011, at 2:08:22 AM, you
                                                      > wrote:
                                                      >
                                                      > > Very interested in knowing who those CSTs .
                                                      >
                                                      > Mere sarcasm, Bachan. You may rest easy.

                                                      Ron, I still haven't met any CSTs who claim Scrum is the only way to be agile, or that agility is more important than effectiveness. If you haven't either, it would be gracious of you to lay off the unkind words.

                                                      --mj
                                                    • Craig Davidson
                                                      Hi Jens, Interesting conclusion, do you see many parallels between the NNPDG and K&J Scrum? Cheers, Craig
                                                      Message 26 of 27 , Jul 11, 2011
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                                                        Hi Jens,

                                                        Interesting conclusion, do you see many parallels between the NNPDG and K&J Scrum?

                                                        Cheers,

                                                        Craig


                                                        On 8 July 2011 21:37, jens.meydam <jens.meydam@...> wrote:
                                                         

                                                        A few days ago I gave a presentation on this topic.

                                                        http://www.slideshare.net/jmeydam/facebook-and-scrum

                                                        Preliminary conclusion: The development process at Facebook has striking parallels to Scrum as described by Takeuchi and Nonaka. (Parallels to "prescriptive Scrum": not so much.)

                                                        What are your thoughts on this?

                                                        Cheers,

                                                        Jens


                                                      • Ron Jeffries
                                                        Hello, Michael. On Monday, July 11, 2011, at 2:53:28 AM, you ... It would be, yes. Thanks for the observation. I do wonder, though, what causes so many people
                                                        Message 27 of 27 , Jul 11, 2011
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                                                          Hello, Michael. On Monday, July 11, 2011, at 2:53:28 AM, you
                                                          wrote:

                                                          > Ron, I still haven't met any CSTs who claim Scrum is the only way
                                                          > to be agile, or that agility is more important than effectiveness.
                                                          > If you haven't either, it would be gracious of you to lay off the unkind words.

                                                          It would be, yes. Thanks for the observation.

                                                          I do wonder, though, what causes so many people to believe what none
                                                          of us are teaching. I really do wonder.

                                                          Ron Jeffries
                                                          www.XProgramming.com
                                                          I'm giving the best advice I have. You get to decide whether it's true for you.
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