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Swarming, I just don't get it.

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  • agilejedi
    The use of the bee as a metaphor for industry is well founded. Work together, help each other, etc..., is all common sense. I don t get how swarming is some
    Message 1 of 62 , Jan 3, 2011
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      The use of the bee as a metaphor for industry is well founded. Work together, help each other, etc..., is all common sense.

      I don't get how swarming is some rite of passage and when you see your SCRUM teaming swarming you know they have arrived.

      I don't see how having the entire team working on the same story is generally the best approach.

      I recognize that the practice of pair programming in XP has been a hard pill to swallow but now we have whole team programming? Is that what this really is?

      The premise that the quality of the design, architecture, and code will be lifted up by the sum of everyone's capability is not generally true. There are times when the results become more mediocre with the increase in participants.

      For example, I have seen using generics banned because the majority of the developers did not understand how to read the syntax.

      I have seen what I have deemed the best proposal removed from the possible solution set just because the person was tired of arguing with the vocal, big mouthed, team idiot. (I know, I should say what I really feel and stop holding back.)

      It is not proven that two minds are better than one. But it may be proven that given any two minds one is better than the other.

      The idea that a developer working alone will rapidly loose motivation is not a fact either. I have often lost motivation when being saddled with a hard headed developer that should consider a new career, but hey, we can't say that, everyone is valued.

      Now, if swarming is just the new term to mean:
      - Divide up a product into features, features into tasks, and tasks into sub-tasks, and let's work together to take advantage of parallel effort...
      - Communicate with knowledgeable people and get new ideas
      - Keep the saw sharp
      - Work together to help avoid human faults such as forgetfulness, being distracted, etc.
      - basically so all good things we could do to develop software with none of the bad things
      - When the code has someone's life on the line get another pair of eyes on it, maybe even do a formal review, or use a very tight process heavy approach.

      Maybe management would like developers to be like bees. We all work in our roles, all roles work synergistic-ally to the benefit of the whole, and we will never want to change our role, our position, leave the hive, serve a new queen, become the queen, or get a little personal recognition, because we are not people, we are bees.

      Sorry, I don't get it.

      AJ
    • Ron Jeffries
      Hello, Seyit. Very well put! Thanks! On Friday, January 7, 2011, at 6:17:36 AM, you ... Ron Jeffries www.XProgramming.com Know what I pray for? The strength to
      Message 62 of 62 , Jan 7, 2011
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        Hello, Seyit.

        Very well put! Thanks!

        On Friday, January 7, 2011, at 6:17:36 AM, you
        wrote:

        > Wouldn't you think if team used swarming "in a right fashion" (what ever it
        > is):

        > 1. Majorty might learn how to read the syntax of generics,
        > 2. "The vocal, big mouthed, team idiot", might realize he's not the boss and
        > should get well with the whole team or he needs to get the .... out,
        > 3. The lesser mind can learn something from the better one.

        > My team doesn't use swarming and also I don't have any first hand experience
        > on that. But considering the examples you have, and definition of swarming,
        > it seems actually teams you describe might give it a try.

        > Proposition 1: Two minds are always better than one, if they are combined in
        > the right fashion. So you might be doing it wrong.
        > Proposition 2: Given two minds, it's not proven there exists a pattern to
        > find which one is better. So it doesn't matter if one is better than the
        > other.



        Ron Jeffries
        www.XProgramming.com
        Know what I pray for? The strength to change what I can, the inability to
        accept what I can't and the incapacity to tell the difference. --Calvin and Hobbes
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