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Re: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Keeping cross-cutting tasks visible (without technical stories)

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  • Ron Jeffries
    Hello, Tobias, Excellent! Just what I like to see! R On Monday, December 6, 2010, at 1:51:46 PM, ... Ron Jeffries www.XProgramming.com In times of stress, I
    Message 1 of 28 , Dec 6, 2010
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      Hello, Tobias,

      Excellent! Just what I like to see!

      R

      On Monday, December 6, 2010, at 1:51:46 PM,
      you wrote:

      > I can't take credit for it either. I first witnessed this with a
      > team I worked with at Business Week in NYC. It emerged from the
      > collective consciousness of the team. As I recall this is what
      > they did (just expanding on Carlton's description):

      > Whenever they found technical debt, or any kind of code problem
      > that needed fixing, they didn't fix it unless it was essential to
      > complete the story they were working on (this took some
      > discipline). Otherwise they wrote a sticky note (a task) and added
      > it to a special box on the visual management wall labeled
      > Technical Debt. This served two purposes: a reminder to the team,
      > and a visual representation to the business of the state of the codebase.

      > At any subsequent planning meeting, when the USER-FACING stories
      > were discussed (I don't buy into the concept of "technical
      > stories") someone may remind the team that if such-and-such a
      > story was attempted then certain code debt items called out on the
      > wall would need to be fixed as part of that story. The rule was
      > "no workarounds". This clean up work was then considered as part
      > of the essential work of the story, and the story was estimated accordingly.

      > These tasks were NOT part of the backlog, they didn't get
      > prioritized and were never fixed in isolation. Instead, when the
      > story was estimated and committed to, these tasks simply became
      > extra tasks towards the completion of the story. It was very
      > elegant, very simple and it worked well for that team. Code debt
      > got cleaned up when doing so resulted in value to the user.

      > And visually everyone could see the results of that clean up: An fast-emptying space on the wall.



      Ron Jeffries
      www.XProgramming.com
      In times of stress, I like to turn to the wisdom of my Portuguese waitress,
      who said: "Olá, meu nome é Marisol e eu serei sua garçonete."
      -- after Mark Vaughn, Autoweek.
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