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Re: Why does Scrum has a role for PO?

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  • gregc
    We should recognize that when Scrum was first developed, product managers did not exist in many and maybe even most commercial product companies and certainly
    Message 1 of 44 , Oct 1, 2010
      We should recognize that when Scrum was first developed, product managers did not exist in many and maybe even most commercial product companies and certainly not in IT or customer development companies.
      So Scrum created a role (not a title) for someone to represent the business and customer interests in the development process.

      Now in commercial development, product managers are common. Although project managers still are the dominant customer voice in IT and custom development. So even today, not all Scrum implementations have an existing product manager to call upon.

      Lastly, if you map responsibilities, the PO role is a subset of the responsibilities of what a product manager could handle (but PM is a title not a role, so this varies from company to company.) Enthiosys (Luke Hohman, Scott Gilbert, Rich Mironov) did some work in this area and concluded that when a company transitions to Scrum, if the PM assumes the PO role, their work load can expand upwards of 40%. So that is why it doesn't always work perfectly if no other changes are made.

      -greg

      Greg Cohen | Senior Principal Consultant | www.280group.com |
      Author: Agile Excellence for Product Managers



      --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Ron Jeffries <ronjeffries@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hello, Peter. On Thursday, September 30, 2010, at 2:43:22 PM, you
      > wrote:
      >
      > >> But you said /product manager/. Yes, the /company/ might have a
      > >> Product Manager. As you say, most do ...
      > >>
      > > Oops! My mistake. So your comments now make much more sense.
      >
      > Actually, I'd argue that they made sense all along ... :)
      >
      > >> ... what I see more often is that the Product Manager has many
      > >> outside responsibilities, marketing, sales interfacing, customer
      > >> contact, and more, which is already a full-time job. The result,
      > >> often, is that the PO job is too much for the real PM ... and again,
      > >> it gets delegated.
      > >>
      > > Where does it get delegated to? I have mostly seen it in the development
      > > organization, rather than staying in the business organization....
      >
      > Yes, that's what I most commonly see as well ... this sets up an
      > inherent communications bottleneck and leads to trouble on several
      > dimensions.
      >
      > Ron Jeffries
      > www.XProgramming.com
      > www.xprogramming.com/blog
      > If not now, when? -- The Talmud
      >
    • Don MacIntyre
      ... Hi Greg, Thanks. No, I have not found the time to do any writing but it is certainly something I d love to find time for. (But then if I was really writing
      Message 44 of 44 , Oct 5, 2010
        --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "gregc" <greg@...> wrote:
        >You must have some great stories to tell. Have you ever written any of it down?

        Hi Greg, Thanks. No, I have not found the time to do any writing but it is certainly something I'd love to find time for.

        (But then if I was really writing I wouldn't be able to start sentences with 'but' and end with prepositions. ;)

        -don
        http://www.scrumalliance.org/profiles/26043-don-macintyre
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