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Re: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Product Owner Identification Problems

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  • Jon Archer
    Luckily we were able to transition the grass roots efforts of our group into a CTO supported effort fairly quickly with numerous teams now transitioning to
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 2, 2010
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      Luckily we were able to transition the grass roots efforts of our group into a CTO supported effort fairly quickly with numerous teams now transitioning to scrum.

      Luckily the CTO was warm to the idea having seen a fair bit about the benefits of "agile" at various conferences etc. 

      We have subsequently had "executive education" delivered to VPs etc. which did a lot to get them on board. The sort of material they tend to present is focused on:

      - delivering value to market faster
      - more predictable outcomes
      - big names that have succeeded w/agile

      Maybe you can either lure in a consultancy that provide a similar kind of presentation to get the execs drooling or assemble such a thing yourself. All that said, I'm not a big fan of where many presentations like that focus the emphasis...but it might be a necessary evil to get what you're after.

      HTH,
      Jon

      On Thu, Sep 2, 2010 at 3:48 PM, Richard <rdahl@...> wrote:
       

      No. They don't even know what it is. Thats what I am trying to figure out. How best should I present this to them. I can get my boss on board but I'm not sure the higher ups would go along with it.


      --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Jon Archer <jon@...> wrote:
      >
      > Are the people 2 - 3 levels above genuinely committed to introducing scrum
      > into your organization? If they are then they ought to be sympathetic to the
      > idea of starting with an orthodox implementation (i.e., one where you have a
      > product owner...singular).
      >
      > Jon
      >
      > On Thu, Sep 2, 2010 at 3:26 PM, Rick Dahl <rdahl@...> wrote:
      >
      > >
      > >
      > > We are currently undergoing some changes in our structure and we are trying
      > > to set a priority list/road map using a committee of 10 people. Everything
      > > I have read and even a little bit of my common sense says this is not going
      > > to work. You need to have someone own those decisions. How do I try and
      > > communicate this to people 2 - 3 levels above me?
      > >
      > > Thanks for your help,
      > >
      > > Rick
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >


    • tri.nguyen09
      It reminds me of a video that I recently saw that illustrates the issue that you will likley have. It s design related but the results nevertheless will
      Message 2 of 7 , Sep 2, 2010
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        It reminds me of a video that I recently saw that illustrates the issue that you will likley have. It's design related but the results nevertheless will probably be something similar. Video url is below. Enjoy.

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wac3aGn5twc

        Tri

        --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Jon Archer <jon@...> wrote:
        >
        > Luckily we were able to transition the grass roots efforts of our group into
        > a CTO supported effort fairly quickly with numerous teams now transitioning
        > to scrum.
        >
        > Luckily the CTO was warm to the idea having seen a fair bit about the
        > benefits of "agile" at various conferences etc.
        >
        > We have subsequently had "executive education" delivered to VPs etc. which
        > did a lot to get them on board. The sort of material they tend to present is
        > focused on:
        >
        > - delivering value to market faster
        > - more predictable outcomes
        > - big names that have succeeded w/agile
        >
        > Maybe you can either lure in a consultancy that provide a similar kind of
        > presentation to get the execs drooling or assemble such a thing yourself.
        > All that said, I'm not a big fan of where many presentations like that focus
        > the emphasis...but it might be a necessary evil to get what you're after.
        >
        > HTH,
        > Jon
        >
        > On Thu, Sep 2, 2010 at 3:48 PM, Richard <rdahl@...> wrote:
        >
        > >
        > >
        > > No. They don't even know what it is. Thats what I am trying to figure out.
        > > How best should I present this to them. I can get my boss on board but I'm
        > > not sure the higher ups would go along with it.
        > >
        > > --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com<scrumdevelopment%40yahoogroups.com>,
        > > Jon Archer <jon@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > Are the people 2 - 3 levels above genuinely committed to introducing
        > > scrum
        > > > into your organization? If they are then they ought to be sympathetic to
        > > the
        > > > idea of starting with an orthodox implementation (i.e., one where you
        > > have a
        > > > product owner...singular).
        > > >
        > > > Jon
        > > >
        > > > On Thu, Sep 2, 2010 at 3:26 PM, Rick Dahl <rdahl@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > We are currently undergoing some changes in our structure and we are
        > > trying
        > > > > to set a priority list/road map using a committee of 10 people.
        > > Everything
        > > > > I have read and even a little bit of my common sense says this is not
        > > going
        > > > > to work. You need to have someone own those decisions. How do I try and
        > > > > communicate this to people 2 - 3 levels above me?
        > > > >
        > > > > Thanks for your help,
        > > > >
        > > > > Rick
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
      • Roman Pichler
        If your issue is deciding who should play the product owner role, then I would ask Which products do you develop? and Who is in the best position to own
        Message 3 of 7 , Sep 3, 2010
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          If your issue is deciding who should play the product owner role, then I would ask "Which products do you develop?" and "Who is in the best position to own each products, to work with the team, customers, users and other stakeholders to ensure the success of each product?". This should give you a list of product owner candidates. You may find the the product owner description in chapter 1 of my book "Agile Product Management with Scrum" helpful to select the right individuals: http://bit.ly/aPSkHK

          Best regards,

          Roman
          romanpichler.com

          --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "tri.nguyen09" <tmn731@...> wrote:
          >
          > It reminds me of a video that I recently saw that illustrates the issue that you will likley have. It's design related but the results nevertheless will probably be something similar. Video url is below. Enjoy.
          >
          > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wac3aGn5twc
          >
          > Tri
          >
          > --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Jon Archer <jon@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Luckily we were able to transition the grass roots efforts of our group into
          > > a CTO supported effort fairly quickly with numerous teams now transitioning
          > > to scrum.
          > >
          > > Luckily the CTO was warm to the idea having seen a fair bit about the
          > > benefits of "agile" at various conferences etc.
          > >
          > > We have subsequently had "executive education" delivered to VPs etc. which
          > > did a lot to get them on board. The sort of material they tend to present is
          > > focused on:
          > >
          > > - delivering value to market faster
          > > - more predictable outcomes
          > > - big names that have succeeded w/agile
          > >
          > > Maybe you can either lure in a consultancy that provide a similar kind of
          > > presentation to get the execs drooling or assemble such a thing yourself.
          > > All that said, I'm not a big fan of where many presentations like that focus
          > > the emphasis...but it might be a necessary evil to get what you're after.
          > >
          > > HTH,
          > > Jon
          > >
          > > On Thu, Sep 2, 2010 at 3:48 PM, Richard <rdahl@> wrote:
          > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > No. They don't even know what it is. Thats what I am trying to figure out.
          > > > How best should I present this to them. I can get my boss on board but I'm
          > > > not sure the higher ups would go along with it.
          > > >
          > > > --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com<scrumdevelopment%40yahoogroups.com>,
          > > > Jon Archer <jon@> wrote:
          > > > >
          > > > > Are the people 2 - 3 levels above genuinely committed to introducing
          > > > scrum
          > > > > into your organization? If they are then they ought to be sympathetic to
          > > > the
          > > > > idea of starting with an orthodox implementation (i.e., one where you
          > > > have a
          > > > > product owner...singular).
          > > > >
          > > > > Jon
          > > > >
          > > > > On Thu, Sep 2, 2010 at 3:26 PM, Rick Dahl <rdahl@> wrote:
          > > > >
          > > > > >
          > > > > >
          > > > > > We are currently undergoing some changes in our structure and we are
          > > > trying
          > > > > > to set a priority list/road map using a committee of 10 people.
          > > > Everything
          > > > > > I have read and even a little bit of my common sense says this is not
          > > > going
          > > > > > to work. You need to have someone own those decisions. How do I try and
          > > > > > communicate this to people 2 - 3 levels above me?
          > > > > >
          > > > > > Thanks for your help,
          > > > > >
          > > > > > Rick
          > > > > >
          > > > > >
          > > > > >
          > > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > >
          >
        • Don MacIntyre
          ... Theoretically your corporation should have goals, and your projects should be in support of these goals in some fashion. You should be able to ask any
          Message 4 of 7 , Sep 3, 2010
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            --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Rick Dahl <rdahl@...> wrote:
            >
            > We are currently undergoing some changes in our structure and we are trying
            > to set a priority list/road map using a committee of 10 people. Everything
            > I have read and even a little bit of my common sense says this is not going
            > to work. You need to have someone own those decisions. How do I try and
            > communicate this to people 2 - 3 levels above me?
            >
            > Thanks for your help,
            >
            > Rick
            >

            Theoretically your corporation should have goals, and your projects should be in support of these goals in some fashion. You should be able to ask any upper-level manager what are their goals for the organization.

            A committee is fine for strategizing on projects that should meet these goals, but unless you have a blank-check to do whatever you want, at some point upper management should be buying in to the selected projects.

            Once a project is selected, you do need a single Product Owner for that project.

            Also, be careful with roadmaps. If they become too detailed and have very specific milestones about exactly what will be done when, you'll get wet. (Sitting under a waterfall.;)

            -don
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