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Re: Current studies which show that Agile projects are more successful

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  • woynam
    Interesting. Does anyone have a link to peer reviewed studies that prove that Waterfall projects are more successful than process X, or that RUP projects are
    Message 1 of 19 , Jul 2, 2010
      Interesting.

      Does anyone have a link to peer reviewed studies that prove that Waterfall projects are more successful than process X, or that RUP projects are more successful than Waterfall projects?

      Anyone needing that level of "proof" is simply looking for an excuse not to try agile.

      Mark


      --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "sep" <sepreece@...> wrote:
      >
      > I think all of George's links fail the "disinterested" criterion - they're all from people or organizations with a vested interest in agile, which makes them suspect from a funder's perspective.
      >
      > However, there are a number of papers in ACM and IEEE publications, which you should be able to find in their respective digital libraries. Since they're peer-reviewed, they're likely to be treated as more trustworthy.
      >
      > scott
      >
      > --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, George Dinwiddie <lists@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Hi, Ralph,
      > >
      > > On 7/1/10 6:13 AM, Ralph Jocham wrote:
      > > > Hi All,
      > > > I am searching for some references that show that Agile projects have
      > > > a higher chance of success then other approaches. The references
      > > > should be quotable in a government document ie. come from a
      > > > trustworthy source.
      > >
      > > I have some links on
      > > http://biblio.gdinwiddie.com/biblio/StudiesOfAgileEffectiveness that
      > > might be of interest. If you find other studies, please add them to
      > > that page.
      > >
      > > - George
      > >
      > > --
      > > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
      > > * George Dinwiddie * http://blog.gdinwiddie.com
      > > Software Development http://www.idiacomputing.com
      > > Consultant and Coach http://www.agilemaryland.org
      > > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
      > >
      >
    • Marcelo Costa
      ... Hi, There is an article in the Journal of Research and Development from IBM with a study conducted by IBM Quality Software Engineering (QSE) team that
      Message 2 of 19 , Jul 2, 2010
        On Thu, Jul 1, 2010 at 7:13 AM, Ralph Jocham <rjocham72@...> wrote:
         

        Hi All,
        I am searching for some references that show that Agile projects have a higher chance of success then other approaches.
        The references should be quotable in a government document ie. come from a trustworthy source.

        Thanks in Advance,
        Ralph


        Hi,

        There is an article in the Journal of Research and Development from IBM  with a study conducted by IBM Quality Software Engineering (QSE)  team that demonstrates the use of agile methods. Pretty interesting.

        Search for :

        Agile methods for software practice transformation

        The authors are E. V. Woodward, R. Bowers, V. S. Thio, K. Johnson, M. Srihari and C. J. Bracht.


        Link: http://www.research.ibm.com/journal/abstracts/rd/542/woodward.html


        --
        Marcelo Costa
        www.marcelocosta.net
        -------------------------------------------------
        “You can't always get what you want”,

        Doctor House in apology to Mike Jagger
      • George Dinwiddie
        ... Perhaps, but they are the studies that I know about. It s rare that people study a topic about which they are truly disinterested. ... It would be greatly
        Message 3 of 19 , Jul 3, 2010
          On 7/2/10 3:33 PM, sep wrote:
          > I think all of George's links fail the "disinterested" criterion -
          > they're all from people or organizations with a vested interest in
          > agile, which makes them suspect from a funder's perspective.

          Perhaps, but they are the studies that I know about. It's rare that
          people study a topic about which they are truly disinterested.

          > However, there are a number of papers in ACM and IEEE publications,
          > which you should be able to find in their respective digital
          > libraries. Since they're peer-reviewed, they're likely to be treated
          > as more trustworthy.

          It would be greatly appreciated if you would add links to such papers to
          the bibliography. Please also add a short description, as it's intended
          to be an annotated bibliography, not merely a link-list.

          The intent of that site is not to provide one-sided information, but to
          collect the studies that have been performed for easier access. It's
          not /my/ collection of links, but that of the community. The fact that
          most of the links have been added by me is merely a consequence of the
          fact that people will often report papers on the mailing lists but fail
          to add them to http://biblio.gdinwiddie.com/ .

          - George

          --
          ----------------------------------------------------------------------
          * George Dinwiddie * http://blog.gdinwiddie.com
          Software Development http://www.idiacomputing.com
          Consultant and Coach http://www.agilemaryland.org
          ----------------------------------------------------------------------
        • Peter Stevens (cal)
          On 03.07.10 10:41, George Dinwiddie wrote: Perhaps, but they are the studies that I know about. It s rare that people study a topic about which they are truly
          Message 4 of 19 , Jul 3, 2010
            On 03.07.10 10:41, George Dinwiddie wrote:
             


            Perhaps, but they are the studies that I know about. It's rare that
            people study a topic about which they are truly disinterested.

            _._,___

            Hi George,

            Matthias Stürmer (initiator of the Swiss Parlimentary Working Group in Digital Sustainabilty) recently gave a talk comparing two Evangelists: Jesus Christ and Richard Stallman (in german, don't if google can translate). One of his conclusions: Technology issues are usually matters of faith, simply because issues of so complex, that bringing a rational, quantitative proof is more or less impossible.

            Cheers,

            Peter


            -- 
            Peter Stevens, CSM, CSPO, CSP
            Independent Scrum Trainer and Coach
            Sierra-Charlie Consulting | Zurich | Switzerland
            
            Member of DasScrumTeam.de
            
            blog:  http://scrum-breakfast.com
            tel:   +41 44 586 6450 
            cell:  +41 79 422 6722
            skype: peterstev
          • Ron Jeffries
            Hello, George. On Saturday, July 3, 2010, at 4:41:14 AM, you ... Be odd, wouldn t it? Someone should study that ... Ron Jeffries www.XProgramming.com
            Message 5 of 19 , Jul 3, 2010
              Hello, George. On Saturday, July 3, 2010, at 4:41:14 AM, you
              wrote:

              >> I think all of George's links fail the "disinterested" criterion -
              >> they're all from people or organizations with a vested interest in
              >> agile, which makes them suspect from a funder's perspective.

              > Perhaps, but they are the studies that I know about. It's rare that
              > people study a topic about which they are truly disinterested.

              Be odd, wouldn't it? Someone should study that ...

              Ron Jeffries
              www.XProgramming.com
              www.xprogramming.com/blog
              I have tried in my way to be free. -- Leonard Cohen
            • Michael James
              ... Maybe I will. Come to think of it, naw ... no interest. --mj
              Message 6 of 19 , Jul 3, 2010
                On Jul 3, 2010, at 3:42 AM, Ron Jeffries wrote:

                > Perhaps, but they are the studies that I know about. It's rare that
                > people study a topic about which they are truly disinterested.

                Be odd, wouldn't it? Someone should study that ...

                Maybe I will.

                Come to think of it, naw ... no interest.

                --mj
              • sep
                ... Disinterested =/= uninterested. I didn t in any way mean to disparage the links that George pointed at. However, the request was specific about wanting
                Message 7 of 19 , Jul 4, 2010
                  --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Ron Jeffries <ronjeffries@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hello, George. On Saturday, July 3, 2010, at 4:41:14 AM, you
                  > wrote:
                  >
                  > >> I think all of George's links fail the "disinterested" criterion -
                  > >> they're all from people or organizations with a vested interest in
                  > >> agile, which makes them suspect from a funder's perspective.
                  >
                  > > Perhaps, but they are the studies that I know about. It's rare that
                  > > people study a topic about which they are truly disinterested.
                  >
                  > Be odd, wouldn't it? Someone should study that ...
                  ---

                  Disinterested =/= uninterested.

                  I didn't in any way mean to disparage the links that George pointed at. However, the request was specific about wanting references that could be cited as evidence to a government, which typically is going to assign greater trust to peer-reviewed work.

                  regards,
                  scott
                • George Dinwiddie
                  Hi, Scott, ... Yes, I know. ... Do you have a study that shows that? My experience is that government decisions are made by people, and that they generally
                  Message 8 of 19 , Jul 4, 2010
                    Hi, Scott,

                    On 7/4/10 12:17 PM, sep wrote:
                    > --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Ron Jeffries<ronjeffries@...> wrote:
                    >>
                    >> Hello, George. On Saturday, July 3, 2010, at 4:41:14 AM, you
                    >> wrote:
                    >>
                    >>>> I think all of George's links fail the "disinterested" criterion -
                    >>>> they're all from people or organizations with a vested interest in
                    >>>> agile, which makes them suspect from a funder's perspective.
                    >>
                    >>> Perhaps, but they are the studies that I know about. It's rare that
                    >>> people study a topic about which they are truly disinterested.
                    >>
                    >> Be odd, wouldn't it? Someone should study that ...
                    > ---
                    >
                    > Disinterested =/= uninterested.

                    Yes, I know.

                    > I didn't in any way mean to disparage the links that George pointed
                    > at. However, the request was specific about wanting references that
                    > could be cited as evidence to a government, which typically is going
                    > to assign greater trust to peer-reviewed work.

                    Do you have a study that shows that? My experience is that government
                    decisions are made by people, and that they generally make those
                    decisions on criteria other than the nature of a study.

                    - George

                    --
                    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
                    * George Dinwiddie * http://blog.gdinwiddie.com
                    Software Development http://www.idiacomputing.com
                    Consultant and Coach http://www.agilemaryland.org
                    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
                  • sep
                    ... I suspect Ron does, too, though his quip only makes sense if you pretend he doesn t. ... No studies I m aware of. I have seen RFPs that cited such a
                    Message 9 of 19 , Jul 5, 2010
                      --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, George Dinwiddie <lists@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Hi, Scott,
                      >
                      > On 7/4/10 12:17 PM, sep wrote:
                      > > --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Ron Jeffries<ronjeffries@> wrote:
                      > >>
                      > >> Hello, George. On Saturday, July 3, 2010, at 4:41:14 AM, you
                      > >> wrote:
                      > >>
                      > >>>> I think all of George's links fail the "disinterested" criterion -
                      > >>>> they're all from people or organizations with a vested interest in
                      > >>>> agile, which makes them suspect from a funder's perspective.
                      > >>
                      > >>> Perhaps, but they are the studies that I know about. It's rare that
                      > >>> people study a topic about which they are truly disinterested.
                      > >>
                      > >> Be odd, wouldn't it? Someone should study that ...
                      > > ---
                      > >
                      > > Disinterested =/= uninterested.
                      >
                      > Yes, I know.

                      I suspect Ron does, too, though his quip only makes sense if you pretend he doesn't.

                      >
                      > > I didn't in any way mean to disparage the links that George pointed
                      > > at. However, the request was specific about wanting references that
                      > > could be cited as evidence to a government, which typically is going
                      > > to assign greater trust to peer-reviewed work.
                      >
                      > Do you have a study that shows that? My experience is that government
                      > decisions are made by people, and that they generally make those
                      > decisions on criteria other than the nature of a study.
                      ---

                      No studies I'm aware of. I have seen RFPs that cited such a requirement for supporting documentation. I am aware of contract monitors rejecting citations on this basis. And it has come up, occasionally, in discussions among program committees I've been part of. The issue is just credibility - if you don't personally know enough to validate the results in a paper, and don't have time to repeat the work, it's nice to know that the author at least managed to convince some neutral, peer professionals that the methods and data were sound.

                      scott
                    • George Dinwiddie
                      Scott, ... RFPs for research work or for production systems? In my experience, it s the researchers that care about peer review. And they should; it s their
                      Message 10 of 19 , Jul 6, 2010
                        Scott,

                        On 7/5/10 11:03 AM, sep wrote:
                        >> Do you have a study that shows that? My experience is that government
                        >> decisions are made by people, and that they generally make those
                        >> decisions on criteria other than the nature of a study.
                        > ---
                        >
                        > No studies I'm aware of. I have seen RFPs that cited such a
                        > requirement for supporting documentation. I am aware of contract
                        > monitors rejecting citations on this basis. And it has come up,
                        > occasionally, in discussions among program committees I've been part
                        > of. The issue is just credibility - if you don't personally know
                        > enough to validate the results in a paper, and don't have time to
                        > repeat the work, it's nice to know that the author at least managed
                        > to convince some neutral, peer professionals that the methods and
                        > data were sound.

                        RFPs for research work or for production systems? In my experience,
                        it's the researchers that care about peer review. And they should; it's
                        their system.

                        I haven't found people who want working software to care much about the
                        research, one way or the other. Your experience might be different from
                        mine.

                        - George

                        --
                        ----------------------------------------------------------------------
                        * George Dinwiddie * http://blog.gdinwiddie.com
                        Software Development http://www.idiacomputing.com
                        Consultant and Coach http://www.agilemaryland.org
                        ----------------------------------------------------------------------
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