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where do development type stories go?

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  • todd
    I ve just started reading Mike Cohn s excellent new book titled User Stories Applied. So far i really like the simple and clean writing style. In the
    Message 1 of 66 , Oct 5, 2004
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      I've just started reading Mike Cohn's excellent new book titled "User
      Stories Applied." So far i really like
      the simple and clean writing style.

      In the BigMoneyJobs example it is said something like "use a database
      connection pool"
      isn't a valid user story. That makes sense as users fortunately can be
      ignorant of connection pools. My question is where does this type
      of story go and how does it figure into the schedule? Deciding on which
      connection pool to use requires some effort.

      Along similar lines, where did all the work go in figuring out what
      technologies BigMoneyJobs
      would use? Is it jsp/.net/c++/html/CGI/asp/tomcat etc? Where are
      questions like where will the system be hosted, how will it be managed,
      backedup,
      etc handled?

      My knowledge of scrum is recent, so i may be reaching here, but it
      seems like
      these are legitimate items to put in the product backlog or sprint backlog.

      Perhaps this is different than XP, but the scrum backlog items are not
      limitted
      to stories. The sprint backlog, at least, is for the development team so it
      definitely can contain programming centered tasks.

      Perhaps the connection pool item would be in the sprint backlog because it
      would take some research to determine an approach, assuming you are writing
      your own from scratch.
    • Deb
      Ken s CSM course does cover Scrum pre-project steps - at different levels of detail for different situations: New Unfunded Projects, New Funded Projects,
      Message 66 of 66 , Oct 9, 2004
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        Ken's CSM course does cover Scrum pre-project steps - at different
        levels of detail for different situations: New Unfunded Projects, New
        Funded Projects, Ongoing Projects, Fixed Price/Fixed Date Projects. In
        my copy of the methodology book, these are grouped under the title
        "planning" which occurs before the first Sprint Planning meeting.

        > On Thu, 07 Oct 2004 12:22:32 -0700, todd <todd@p...> wrote:
        >
        > > The lack of a pre-project phase in all the methodologies is major
        lack
        > > in my mind.
        >
        > I would not say this is true of Jim Highsmith's APM. Do others agree
        > or have a different view?
        >
        > This could be an interesting discussion thread in its own right. What
        > do you do wtih the work before a project starts or is funded?
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
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        > Alistair Cockburn
        > President, Humans and Technology
        >
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        >
        > Author of
        > "Surviving Object-Oriented Projects" (1998)
        > "Writing Effective Use Cases" (Jolt Productivity Award 2001)
        > "Agile Software Development" (Jolt Productivity Award 2002)
        >
        > "La perfection est atteinte non quand il ne reste rien a ajouter,
        > mais quand il ne reste rien a enlever." (Saint-Exupery)
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