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Re: [scrumdevelopment] Digest Number 707

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  • Michael Spayd
    Dear George: You have already received a lot of good responses to your question. I hope this one is complementary to the others. Star performers can be very
    Message 1 of 10 , Sep 4, 2004
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      Dear George:
      You have already received a lot of good responses to your question. I
      hope this one is complementary to the others.

      Star performers can be very hard to deal with on teams. It is easy to
      become dependent on them and hard to think about losing them. Some
      thoughts:

      1) Really great performers make those around them better, rather than
      always bringing attention to their own brilliance (see Michael Jordan
      after Phil Jackson started coaching him).
      2) Great teams regularly outperform *groups* with merely brilliant
      players. The best teams, however, are often made up of the most
      talented players who have submerged their egos enough to be a real
      team (see LA Lakers after Phil Jackson but prior to last season).
      3) Being on a real team and collaborating is addicting, even for big
      egos (I would give you examples from the agile community, but don't
      want to embarass anyone or put myself at personal risk :-).
      4) Great coaches know that big egos simply must go, either by being
      deferred to the good of the team (the best option by far) or by being
      tossed.out. They also know that team discipline is more important than
      the superstar's possible performance.

      The conclusion for me in your situation is this. You must be WILLING
      to remove the developer from the team. Then, you must try everything
      you can to NOT have to do that.

      Good Luck. Let us know how it turns out.


      Michael Spayd
      COGILITY
      "Business Mind, Social Heart"



      .
      > Date: Fri, 03 Sep 2004 17:25:36 -0000
      > From: "glgeorgeschlitz" <gjschlitz@...>
      > Subject: Experience with "Challenging" team interpersonal issue
      >
      > Does anyone have recommendations of readings to help deal with more
      > challenging interpersonal issues on Scrum teams? Specifically, take
      > an example of a stellar, brilliant developer who has a great mind
      > for ideal vision of a type software, but doesn't compromise at all
      > for the goals of the team/the sprint, resulting in the team not
      > meeting its sprint goals, though meeting individual goals of
      > remaining true to the ideal (which happens to produce good software-
      > just not the software we agreed to). Recommendations of techniques
      > that have been effective in such situations would be great! I
      > expect that the challenge is to influence yet remain true to the
      > Scrum goal of allowing the team to self-organize....does self
      > organization in this case mean removal from the team if compromise
      > can't be achieved?
      >
      > Thanks
      > George
    • Ron Jeffries
      ... Very nicely put, Michael. Ron Jeffries www.XProgramming.com The practices are not the knowing: they are a path to the knowing.
      Message 2 of 10 , Sep 4, 2004
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        On Saturday, September 4, 2004, at 12:15:34 PM, Michael Spayd wrote:

        > The conclusion for me in your situation is this. You must be WILLING
        > to remove the developer from the team. Then, you must try everything
        > you can to NOT have to do that.

        Very nicely put, Michael.

        Ron Jeffries
        www.XProgramming.com
        The practices are not the knowing: they are a path to the knowing.
      • glgeorgeschlitz
        Great post/advice....much appreciated! ... question. I ... to ... than ... Jordan ... big ... being ... than ... WILLING ... everything
        Message 3 of 10 , Sep 4, 2004
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          Great post/advice....much appreciated!

          --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Michael Spayd
          <michael.spayd@g...> wrote:
          > Dear George:
          > You have already received a lot of good responses to your
          question. I
          > hope this one is complementary to the others.
          >
          > Star performers can be very hard to deal with on teams. It is easy
          to
          > become dependent on them and hard to think about losing them. Some
          > thoughts:
          >
          > 1) Really great performers make those around them better, rather
          than
          > always bringing attention to their own brilliance (see Michael
          Jordan
          > after Phil Jackson started coaching him).
          > 2) Great teams regularly outperform *groups* with merely brilliant
          > players. The best teams, however, are often made up of the most
          > talented players who have submerged their egos enough to be a real
          > team (see LA Lakers after Phil Jackson but prior to last season).
          > 3) Being on a real team and collaborating is addicting, even for
          big
          > egos (I would give you examples from the agile community, but don't
          > want to embarass anyone or put myself at personal risk :-).
          > 4) Great coaches know that big egos simply must go, either by being
          > deferred to the good of the team (the best option by far) or by
          being
          > tossed.out. They also know that team discipline is more important
          than
          > the superstar's possible performance.
          >
          > The conclusion for me in your situation is this. You must be
          WILLING
          > to remove the developer from the team. Then, you must try
          everything
          > you can to NOT have to do that.
          >
          > Good Luck. Let us know how it turns out.
          >
          >
          > Michael Spayd
          > COGILITY
          > "Business Mind, Social Heart"
        • Joseph Pelrine
          http://www.comtrolchaos.com is online with a new look. Congrats! Cheers -- Joseph Pelrine [ | ] MetaProg GmbH Email: jpelrine@metaprog.com Web:
          Message 4 of 10 , Sep 5, 2004
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            http://www.comtrolchaos.com is online with a new look. Congrats!

            Cheers

            --
            Joseph Pelrine [ | ]
            MetaProg GmbH
            Email: jpelrine@...
            Web: http://www.metaprog.com

            You don't become enormously successful without encountering some really
            interesting problems.
            - Mark Victor Hansen
          • Ron Jeffries
            ... Well, not really ... Ron Jeffries www.XProgramming.com My advice is to do it by the book, get good at the practices, then do as you will. Many people want
            Message 5 of 10 , Sep 5, 2004
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              On Sunday, September 5, 2004, at 9:51:22 AM, Joseph Pelrine wrote:

              > http://www.comtrolchaos.com is online with a new look. Congrats!

              Well, not really ...

              Ron Jeffries
              www.XProgramming.com
              My advice is to do it by the book, get good at the practices, then do as
              you will. Many people want to skip to step three. How do they know?
            • Mike Cohn
              No, but www.controlchaos.com is online. We ll have to wait longer for coMtrolchaos. --Mike Cohn Author of User Stories Applied for Agile Software Development
              Message 6 of 10 , Sep 5, 2004
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                No, but www.controlchaos.com is online. We'll have to wait longer for
                coMtrolchaos.

                --Mike Cohn
                Author of User Stories Applied for Agile Software Development
                www.mountaingoatsoftware.com
                www.userstories.com

                -----Original Message-----
                From: Ron Jeffries [mailto:jeffries@...]
                Sent: Sunday, September 05, 2004 8:45 AM
                To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] New look

                On Sunday, September 5, 2004, at 9:51:22 AM, Joseph Pelrine wrote:

                > http://www.comtrolchaos.com is online with a new look. Congrats!

                Well, not really ...

                Ron Jeffries
                www.XProgramming.com
                My advice is to do it by the book, get good at the practices, then do as
                you will. Many people want to skip to step three. How do they know?





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              • Joseph Pelrine
                ... OK, I give up - maybe Italian should be the language for Scrum.... CHeers -- Joseph Pelrine [ | ] MetaProg GmbH Email: jpelrine@metaprog.com Web:
                Message 7 of 10 , Sep 5, 2004
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                  At 17:41 05.09.2004, you wrote:
                  >No, but www.controlchaos.com is online. We'll have to wait longer for
                  >coMtrolchaos.

                  OK, I give up - maybe Italian should be the language for Scrum....

                  CHeers

                  --
                  Joseph Pelrine [ | ]
                  MetaProg GmbH
                  Email: jpelrine@...
                  Web: http://www.metaprog.com

                  You don't become enormously successful without encountering some really
                  interesting problems.
                  - Mark Victor Hansen
                • Marco Abis
                  ... I would vote this! :-) Marco Abis http://agilemovement.it - Italian Agile Movement http://www.agilityspi.com - Agility SPI :: Software Process Improvement
                  Message 8 of 10 , Sep 5, 2004
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                    At 19.41 05/09/2004, Joseph Pelrine wrote:
                    >OK, I give up - maybe Italian should be the language for Scrum....

                    I would vote this! :-)


                    Marco Abis
                    http://agilemovement.it - Italian Agile Movement
                    http://www.agilityspi.com - Agility SPI :: Software Process Improvement
                  • Edmund Schweppe
                    ... Yeah, what Mike said. Obviously, the new & improved Scrum website is controlchaos.com. Now, if it had been a bunch of Unixheads starting flame wars on
                    Message 9 of 10 , Sep 5, 2004
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                      Mike Cohn wrote:
                      > No, but www.controlchaos.com is online. We'll have to wait longer for
                      > coMtrolchaos.

                      Yeah, what Mike said. Obviously, the new & improved Scrum website is
                      controlchaos.com.

                      Now, if it had been a bunch of Unixheads starting flame wars on
                      Microsoft Component Object Model discussion groups, *that* might have
                      qualified as COM-Troll Chaos ...

                      --
                      Edmund Schweppe -- schweppe@... -- http://schweppe.home.tiac.net
                      The opinions expressed herein are at best coincidentally related to
                      those of any past, present or future employer.
                    • Mike Dwyer
                      George: Faced with the similar problem, I stumbled into this solution. When it was my turn to answer the questions 3 What have I done - my answer was try to
                      Message 10 of 10 , Sep 6, 2004
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                        George:
                        Faced with the similar problem, I stumbled into this solution.

                        When it was my turn to answer the 'questions 3'

                        What have I done - my answer was try to make nice for everyone.

                        What will I have done by tomorrow - stop making nice and get this problem
                        solve

                        What is stopping me from getting it done.
                        The fact that this team worries more about themselves than they do about
                        having the customer doing their job better because we gave them the tools
                        they ordered.

                        I need this team to understand that their self-image and their friendships
                        have little to do with the teamwork needed to make the customer successful.

                        For some reason this motivated the 'star' to see himself as a leader and
                        advocate for the customer - of course the customer had the (gleeful)
                        opportunity to remind the 'star' what they needed NOW. After a bit, the
                        'star' was able to move the customer exactly to a point the customer wanted
                        us to be in.

                        Michael F. Dwyer

                        Mike.Dwyer1@...
                        978 683 3439


                        -----Original Message-----
                        From: Michael Spayd [mailto:michael.spayd@...]
                        Sent: Saturday, September 04, 2004 12:16 PM
                        To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Digest Number 707

                        Dear George:
                        You have already received a lot of good responses to your question. I
                        hope this one is complementary to the others.

                        Star performers can be very hard to deal with on teams. It is easy to
                        become dependent on them and hard to think about losing them. Some
                        thoughts:

                        1) Really great performers make those around them better, rather than
                        always bringing attention to their own brilliance (see Michael Jordan
                        after Phil Jackson started coaching him).
                        2) Great teams regularly outperform *groups* with merely brilliant
                        players. The best teams, however, are often made up of the most
                        talented players who have submerged their egos enough to be a real
                        team (see LA Lakers after Phil Jackson but prior to last season).
                        3) Being on a real team and collaborating is addicting, even for big
                        egos (I would give you examples from the agile community, but don't
                        want to embarass anyone or put myself at personal risk :-).
                        4) Great coaches know that big egos simply must go, either by being
                        deferred to the good of the team (the best option by far) or by being
                        tossed.out. They also know that team discipline is more important than
                        the superstar's possible performance.

                        The conclusion for me in your situation is this. You must be WILLING
                        to remove the developer from the team. Then, you must try everything
                        you can to NOT have to do that.

                        Good Luck. Let us know how it turns out.


                        Michael Spayd
                        COGILITY
                        "Business Mind, Social Heart"



                        .
                        > Date: Fri, 03 Sep 2004 17:25:36 -0000
                        > From: "glgeorgeschlitz" <gjschlitz@...>
                        > Subject: Experience with "Challenging" team interpersonal issue
                        >
                        > Does anyone have recommendations of readings to help deal with more
                        > challenging interpersonal issues on Scrum teams? Specifically, take
                        > an example of a stellar, brilliant developer who has a great mind
                        > for ideal vision of a type software, but doesn't compromise at all
                        > for the goals of the team/the sprint, resulting in the team not
                        > meeting its sprint goals, though meeting individual goals of
                        > remaining true to the ideal (which happens to produce good software-
                        > just not the software we agreed to). Recommendations of techniques
                        > that have been effective in such situations would be great! I
                        > expect that the challenge is to influence yet remain true to the
                        > Scrum goal of allowing the team to self-organize....does self
                        > organization in this case mean removal from the team if compromise
                        > can't be achieved?
                        >
                        > Thanks
                        > George



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