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Personal goals on a Scrum team

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  • Andrew Wagner
    So I understand that Scrum is all about the team. Still, in any job, you want to be able to set goals for yourself and know whether or not you re improving in
    Message 1 of 12 , Dec 3, 2009
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      So I understand that Scrum is all about the team. Still, in any job, you want to be able to set goals for yourself and know whether or not you're improving in your ability to contribute. So, how can an individual on a Scrum team still measure their own individual contribution? (Note that this is not the team/SM/PO/chicken measuring the individual, but the individual measuring themselves)

      Thanks
    • David
      ... Would that not be a question to ask your team? Even as an individual I would hope that in a work environment the goal of that improvement is a common one.
      Message 2 of 12 , Dec 3, 2009
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        On 03/12/2009 10:26 AM, Andrew Wagner wrote:
        > So I understand that Scrum is all about the team. Still, in any job, you
        > want to be able to set goals for yourself and know whether or not you're
        > improving in your ability to contribute. So, how can an individual on a
        > Scrum team still measure their own individual contribution? (Note that this
        > is not the team/SM/PO/chicken measuring the individual, but the individual
        > measuring themselves)
        >
        Would that not be a question to ask your team? Even as an individual I
        would hope that in a work environment the goal of that improvement is a
        common one. I would expect this to work like any other peer structure
        where learning and feedback loops are employed to judge where you are.

        Many Managers mistake "teams" for a construct where individual needs and
        wants are subjugated to the needs and wants to the majority. That is not
        true and modern research proves the point. This is about balancing your
        needs with "their" needs and using the feedback loops as a mechanism to
        judge how far apart you are and how well you are advancing towards your
        personal goals.

        -d
      • Ilja Preuß
        Ask your team members for feedback? 2009/12/3 Andrew Wagner
        Message 3 of 12 , Dec 3, 2009
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          Ask your team members for feedback?

          2009/12/3 Andrew Wagner <wagner.andrew@...>


          So I understand that Scrum is all about the team. Still, in any job, you want to be able to set goals for yourself and know whether or not you're improving in your ability to contribute. So, how can an individual on a Scrum team still measure their own individual contribution? (Note that this is not the team/SM/PO/chicken measuring the individual, but the individual measuring themselves)

          Thanks



        • Ron Jeffries
          Hello, Andrew. On Thursday, December 3, 2009, at 10:26:40 AM, you ... How do you do it now? Ron Jeffries www.XProgramming.com www.xprogramming.com/blog
          Message 4 of 12 , Dec 3, 2009
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            Hello, Andrew. On Thursday, December 3, 2009, at 10:26:40 AM, you
            wrote:

            > So I understand that Scrum is all about the team. Still, in any job, you
            > want to be able to set goals for yourself and know whether or not you're
            > improving in your ability to contribute. So, how can an individual on a
            > Scrum team still measure their own individual contribution? (Note that this
            > is not the team/SM/PO/chicken measuring the individual, but the individual
            > measuring themselves)

            How do you do it now?

            Ron Jeffries
            www.XProgramming.com
            www.xprogramming.com/blog
            Thousands of years ago, the first man discovered how to make fire.
            He was probably burned at the stake he had taught his brothers to
            light - Howard Roark (The Fountainhead, Ayn Rand)
          • Hariprakash Agrawal
            In my opinion, it is always a good thought to set goals for self, measure them and keep improving. Whether team is following agile or not, I think individuals
            Message 5 of 12 , Dec 3, 2009
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              In my opinion, it is always a good thought to set goals for self, measure them and keep improving. Whether team is following agile or not, I think individuals should set goals. Below, I am attempting to write some goals from a developer perspective which should help him/her grow:

              Productivity: How many features I could complete in how much time? or how many story points are done? Am I improving over time?
              Product Quality: what is the cyclomatic complexity, fan-in, fan-out measure for my code? How many memory leaks were found by others or a code analysis tool? How many non-compliance I got during unit testing? Did I get my design/code reviewed by at least 2 persons? etc etc
              Customer Satisfaction: How does customer perceive me or team? Am I able to respond to customer within one working day or less? Am I able to get specific feature in detail from customer?
              Perception of team members: How teams members perceive me? May be, have 1:1 with peers / seniors and seek feedback and act upon.
              Innovation: How many innovations (may be small) I could bring? Is it patentable?
              Skill development: Am I able to improve my skill? Do I have cross-functional skills, like, can I be good tester as well? How do I rate myself on particular skill?

              Many more areas can be thought and goals can be set. However, its important that we remain humble with positive attitude.

              --
              Regards,
              Hariprakash Agrawal (Hari),
              An Agile Coach (XP, Scrum), Certified Scrum Master, Trained Six Sigma Black Belt, CMMi Consultant, ISO 9001:2000 Lead Auditor, MTech (Reliability & Quality Engg) from IIT-KGP
              http://opcord.com - OpCord provides trainings/consulting on many frameworks/processes and testing services for organizations


              On Thu, Dec 3, 2009 at 9:05 PM, Ilja Preuß <iljapreuss@...> wrote:
               

              Ask your team members for feedback?

              2009/12/3 Andrew Wagner <wagner.andrew@...>



              So I understand that Scrum is all about the team. Still, in any job, you want to be able to set goals for yourself and know whether or not you're improving in your ability to contribute. So, how can an individual on a Scrum team still measure their own individual contribution? (Note that this is not the team/SM/PO/chicken measuring the individual, but the individual measuring themselves)

              Thanks






              --
              Regards,
              Hariprakash Agrawal (Hari),
              An Agile Coach (XP, Scrum), Certified Scrum Master, Trained Six Sigma Black Belt, CMMi Consultant, ISO 9001:2000 Lead Auditor, MTech (Reliability & Quality Engg) from IIT-KGP
              http://opcord.com - OpCord provides trainings/consulting on many frameworks/processes and testing services for organizations
            • Andrew Wagner
              I can t say I do with any significant degree of specificity.
              Message 6 of 12 , Dec 3, 2009
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                I can't say I do with any significant degree of specificity.

                On Thu, Dec 3, 2009 at 10:38 AM, Ron Jeffries <ronjeffries@...> wrote:
                How do you do it now?

                Ron Jeffries
                www.XProgramming.com
                www.xprogramming.com/blog
                Thousands of years ago, the first man discovered how to make fire.
                He was probably burned at the stake he had taught his brothers to
                light - Howard Roark (The Fountainhead, Ayn Rand)


              • Ron Jeffries
                Hello, Andrew. On Thursday, December 3, 2009, at 11:31:02 AM, you ... Keep that up, then. No, really. Ron Jeffries www.XProgramming.com
                Message 7 of 12 , Dec 3, 2009
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                  Hello, Andrew. On Thursday, December 3, 2009, at 11:31:02 AM, you
                  wrote:

                  > I can't say I do with any significant degree of specificity.

                  Keep that up, then. No, really.

                  Ron Jeffries
                  www.XProgramming.com
                  www.xprogramming.com/blog
                  We accomplish what we understand. If we are to accomplish something
                  together, we need to understand it together.
                • Andrew Wagner
                  You don t consider it important to have personal goals?
                  Message 8 of 12 , Dec 3, 2009
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                    You don't consider it important to have personal goals?

                    On Thu, Dec 3, 2009 at 12:18 PM, Ron Jeffries <ronjeffries@...> wrote:
                     

                    Hello, Andrew. On Thursday, December 3, 2009, at 11:31:02 AM, you
                    wrote:



                    > I can't say I do with any significant degree of specificity.

                    Keep that up, then. No, really. We accomplish what we understand. If we are to accomplish something
                    together, we need to understand it together.


                  • Ron Jeffries
                    Hello, Andrew. On Thursday, December 3, 2009, at 12:31:22 PM, you ... I think if someone is doing OK without them, that Scrum offers no new challenges and
                    Message 9 of 12 , Dec 3, 2009
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                      Hello, Andrew. On Thursday, December 3, 2009, at 12:31:22 PM, you
                      wrote:

                      > You don't consider it important to have personal goals?

                      I think if someone is doing OK without them, that Scrum offers no
                      new challenges and needs no new answer.

                      Ron Jeffries
                      www.XProgramming.com
                      www.xprogramming.com/blog
                      How do I know what I think until I hear what I say? -- E M Forster
                    • Malik Jaibeer
                      ... Good that you should have personal goals and it is not much different the way you would have managed in traditional ways. But definitely in Scrum, it asks
                      Message 10 of 12 , Dec 3, 2009
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                        >> You don't consider it important to have personal goals?
                        >I think if someone is doing OK without them, that Scrum offers no
                        >new challenges and needs no new answer.


                        Good that you should have personal goals and it is not much different the way you would have managed in traditional ways. But definitely in Scrum, it asks for more like team spirit, team work etc. which you could have overlooked in traditional ways.


                         
                        Thanks & Regards,

                        Jai
                        http://twitter.com/jaibeermalik
                        http://jaibeermalik.wordpress.com



                        > You don't consider it important to have personal goals?

                        I think if someone is doing OK without them, that Scrum offers no
                        new challenges and needs no new answer.



                        Ron Jeffries
                        www.XProgramming. com
                        www.xprogramming. com/blog
                        How do I know what I think until I hear what I say? -- E M Forster



                        The INTERNET now has a personality. YOURS! See your Yahoo! Homepage.
                      • Heitor Roriz Filho
                        The ideal Scrum Team should have personal goals, at least the one of continuous improvement of the work performed. If your team does not have any goals, they
                        Message 11 of 12 , Dec 3, 2009
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                          The ideal Scrum Team should have personal goals, at least the one of continuous improvement of the work performed. If your team does not have any goals, they are still under development. (forming, storming, performing etc. if you like)

                          I would take the time during retrospectives and rise questions regarding this topic. This would be a subtle way to "ask the team for feedback" as Preuss said. I think this would be a nice start.

                          Heitor

                          On Thu, Dec 3, 2009 at 3:11 PM, Malik Jaibeer <jaibeer_malik@...> wrote:
                           

                          >> You don't consider it important to have personal goals?
                          >I think if someone is doing OK without them, that Scrum offers no
                          >new challenges and needs no new answer.


                          Good that you should have personal goals and it is not much different the way you would have managed in traditional ways. But definitely in Scrum, it asks for more like team spirit, team work etc. which you could have overlooked in traditional ways.


                           
                          Thanks & Regards,

                          Jai
                          http://twitter.com/jaibeermalik
                          http://jaibeermalik.wordpress.com



                          > You don't consider it important to have personal goals?

                          I think if someone is doing OK without them, that Scrum offers no
                          new challenges and needs no new answer.



                          Ron Jeffries
                          www.XProgramming. com
                          www.xprogramming. com/blog
                          How do I know what I think until I hear what I say? -- E M Forster



                          The INTERNET now has a personality. YOURS! See your Yahoo! Homepage.

                        • Roy Morien
                          I try to play golf. I am sure many people would say I don t play golf ... I probably play golf-but. However, golf, in its purest amateur sense, is a game in
                          Message 12 of 12 , Dec 3, 2009
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                            I try to play golf. I am sure many people would say I don't play golf ... I probably play golf-but. However, golf, in its purest amateur sense, is a game in which you compete against yourself. You try to improve by practice, by watching golf videos, by watching the professionals in the Masters tournaments on tv ... etc. etc.
                             
                            What you normally don't do is go round the 19th hole asking people if they think you have improved, or if they perceive you as being an improving player etc.
                             
                            You set achievable goals for yourself. You evaluate your own performance. If you are always slicing the ball, you seek help from the club professional to improve your swing. What you don't do, and really can't do, is to measue the degree of improvement in your slice ... "Today I only sliced at 43degrees angle which is an improvement of 4 degrees of slice angle from yesterday.
                             
                            Partly I am motivated by the opinion of other golfers who seem to either snigger or raise their eyes to heaven in disbelief at my poor golfing skills. Partly, in fact mostly, I want to improve because it gives me great satisfaction to show an improvement; personal satisfaction, personal perception of improvement, personal pride in achievement ... Yeah, even when I am chasing a little ball around and frequently hitting it with a stick.
                             
                            Basically, I believe that most people, bad golfers included, want to improve on their performance, mostly for personal satisfaction and self-pride.
                             
                            And basically, I believe that most people, Scrum-performing software developers included,  want to improve on their performance, mostly for personal satisfaction and self-pride. If that brings them recognition within the team, and brings them reward in the way of a T-Shirt with 'Up Team, Yay!' written on it, or a raise in salary, or whatever, then that's fine too.
                             
                            Especially in the case of software developers, it is difficult to quantitatively measure performance and performance improvement. But there is something very real in feeling the satisfaction of having 'done a good job better than last time'. That's how I think the individual can measure their own individual contribution. 
                             
                            It is a bit like measuring 'conscience', or 'satisfaction' ... I think we all have both in varying degrees ... but we can't measure it.
                             
                            Regards,
                            Roy Morien

                            To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                            From: dmalloc@...
                            Date: Thu, 3 Dec 2009 10:34:34 -0500
                            Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Personal goals on a Scrum team

                             
                            On 03/12/2009 10:26 AM, Andrew Wagner wrote:
                            > So I understand that Scrum is all about the team. Still, in any job, you
                            > want to be able to set goals for yourself and know whether or not you're
                            > improving in your ability to contribute. So, how can an individual on a
                            > Scrum team still measure their own individual contribution? (Note that this
                            > is not the team/SM/PO/chicken measuring the individual, but the individual
                            > measuring themselves)
                            >
                            Would that not be a question to ask your team? Even as an individual I
                            would hope that in a work environment the goal of that improvement is a
                            common one. I would expect this to work like any other peer structure
                            where learning and feedback loops are employed to judge where you are.

                            Many Managers mistake "teams" for a construct where individual needs and
                            wants are subjugated to the needs and wants to the majority. That is not
                            true and modern research proves the point. This is about balancing your
                            needs with "their" needs and using the feedback loops as a mechanism to
                            judge how far apart you are and how well you are advancing towards your
                            personal goals.

                            -d



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