Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

RE: [scrumdevelopment] assessment Discussion

Expand Messages
  • Shoni Blue
    I think it s also important to realize a PO is not simply a role; and the answer not black and white. Whether they attend the daily or not-or derive benefit
    Message 1 of 73 , Oct 31, 2009
    • 0 Attachment

      I think it’s also important to realize a PO is not simply a role; and the answer not black and white. Whether they attend the daily or not—or derive benefit from it—does not solely depend on their role, but on the personalities as well.   

       

      As a newbie to this list, I would bravely suggest the SM be cognizant of the PO impact (to the team/discussion) and manage their daily meeting participation accordingly. That doesn’t necessarily mean the SM defines new rules or makes sweeping dictation restricting participation.  Perhaps it only means the SM discusses the observed impacts and lets the Scrum team converse and decide what works for their situation.  

       

      To be clear, I am only referring to the Scrum daily; I make no inference to other items of conversation.

       

      Respectfully,

      Shoni Blue

       

       

       

      From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Michael James
      Sent: Friday, October 30, 2009 10:38 AM
      To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] assessment Discussion

       

       



      On Oct 30, 2009, at 10:21 AM, George Dinwiddie wrote:

      > I've observed POs who /almost/ always attended the Daily Scrum, and
      > did
      > not micromanage. Quite the contrary, it gave them an appreciation for
      > what the development team was doing and the challenges they were
      > facing.
      > Frequently it was the PO, rather than the Scrummaster, who
      > volunteered
      > to do something about some impediment the team was facing. While
      > working on such an issue, the PO would also answer the three
      > questions.
      >
      > Maybe it's no longer Scrum, but it was a team in which *everybody*
      > seemed to feel a common stake in the outcome and the work being done.
      > And that wasn't true when they first made the transition.
      >
      > There's more than one way to skin every cat. If it's no longer the
      > definition of Scrum, so be it. I'll take effectiveness and trust
      > between people any day.

      Agreeing with all of this.

      The tricky part is when the PO (or ScrumMaster) also has explicit or
      implicit management authority over the rest of the team. As Keith
      Johnstone put it, there are no status-free transactions. Boss-in-the-
      meeting affects the team whether or not boss is inclined to exercise
      his authority. I've seen team breakthroughs occur when the boss
      leaves the room, just as I'm suddenly able to find my car keys when my
      wife's not home.

      --mj
      .
      . An example checklist for serious ScrumMasters: http://tinyurl.com/cvdwor
      . 5-page illustrated summary of Scrum: http://refcardz.dzone.com/refcardz/scrum
      .

    • Shoni Blue
      I think it s also important to realize a PO is not simply a role; and the answer not black and white. Whether they attend the daily or not-or derive benefit
      Message 73 of 73 , Oct 31, 2009
      • 0 Attachment

        I think it’s also important to realize a PO is not simply a role; and the answer not black and white. Whether they attend the daily or not—or derive benefit from it—does not solely depend on their role, but on the personalities as well.   

         

        As a newbie to this list, I would bravely suggest the SM be cognizant of the PO impact (to the team/discussion) and manage their daily meeting participation accordingly. That doesn’t necessarily mean the SM defines new rules or makes sweeping dictation restricting participation.  Perhaps it only means the SM discusses the observed impacts and lets the Scrum team converse and decide what works for their situation.  

         

        To be clear, I am only referring to the Scrum daily; I make no inference to other items of conversation.

         

        Respectfully,

        Shoni Blue

         

         

         

        From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Michael James
        Sent: Friday, October 30, 2009 10:38 AM
        To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] assessment Discussion

         

         



        On Oct 30, 2009, at 10:21 AM, George Dinwiddie wrote:

        > I've observed POs who /almost/ always attended the Daily Scrum, and
        > did
        > not micromanage. Quite the contrary, it gave them an appreciation for
        > what the development team was doing and the challenges they were
        > facing.
        > Frequently it was the PO, rather than the Scrummaster, who
        > volunteered
        > to do something about some impediment the team was facing. While
        > working on such an issue, the PO would also answer the three
        > questions.
        >
        > Maybe it's no longer Scrum, but it was a team in which *everybody*
        > seemed to feel a common stake in the outcome and the work being done.
        > And that wasn't true when they first made the transition.
        >
        > There's more than one way to skin every cat. If it's no longer the
        > definition of Scrum, so be it. I'll take effectiveness and trust
        > between people any day.

        Agreeing with all of this.

        The tricky part is when the PO (or ScrumMaster) also has explicit or
        implicit management authority over the rest of the team. As Keith
        Johnstone put it, there are no status-free transactions. Boss-in-the-
        meeting affects the team whether or not boss is inclined to exercise
        his authority. I've seen team breakthroughs occur when the boss
        leaves the room, just as I'm suddenly able to find my car keys when my
        wife's not home.

        --mj
        .
        . An example checklist for serious ScrumMasters: http://tinyurl.com/cvdwor
        . 5-page illustrated summary of Scrum: http://refcardz.dzone.com/refcardz/scrum
        .

      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.