Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Assessing agility

Expand Messages
  • Andrew Wagner
    So, where I work, we do some things in a scrum-like manner: CI, iterations, daily standups, backlog, burndown chart, etc. And some things...not so much: only a
    Message 1 of 11 , Jul 7, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      So, where I work, we do some things in a scrum-like manner: CI, iterations, daily standups, backlog, burndown chart, etc. And some things...not so much: only a couple of actual releases a year, separate dev and QA teams, no pairing, etc.

      On the plus side, our VP has recently said that we're going to be becoming "more scrum-like" (woohoo!) and has asked for input. So, my question is, what is the best way to assess what areas we most need to improve in, without shelling out the big bucks to bring in some outside consultant?
    • Federico Zaiatz
      Hi Andrew, There s an interesting document written by Jeff Sutherland that may help you (at least, it may be a good place to start). It s called Shock Therapy
      Message 2 of 11 , Jul 7, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi Andrew,

        There's an interesting document written by Jeff Sutherland that may help you (at least, it may be a good place to start). It's called "Shock Therapy - Self organization in Scrum". This document can be accessed from here.


        Chrs,
        Fede



        On Tue, Jul 7, 2009 at 10:12 AM, Andrew Wagner <wagner.andrew@...> wrote:


        So, where I work, we do some things in a scrum-like manner: CI, iterations, daily standups, backlog, burndown chart, etc. And some things...not so much: only a couple of actual releases a year, separate dev and QA teams, no pairing, etc.


        On the plus side, our VP has recently said that we're going to be becoming "more scrum-like" (woohoo!) and has asked for input. So, my question is, what is the best way to assess what areas we most need to improve in, without shelling out the big bucks to bring in some outside consultant?

      • Chet Hendrickson
        Hello Andrew, Take a look at: http://www.exampler.com/blog/2009/06/10/the-seven-pillars-of-an-agile-team-introduction/. ... -- Best regards, Chet Hendrickson
        Message 3 of 11 , Jul 7, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          Hello Andrew,

          Take a look at: http://www.exampler.com/blog/2009/06/10/the-seven-pillars-of-an-agile-team-introduction/.

          Tuesday, July 7, 2009, 9:12:18 AM, you wrote:

          > So, where I work, we do some things in a scrum-like manner: CI, iterations,
          > daily standups, backlog, burndown chart, etc. And some things...not so much:
          > only a couple of actual releases a year, separate dev and QA teams, no
          > pairing, etc.
          > On the plus side, our VP has recently said that we're going to be becoming
          > "more scrum-like" (woohoo!) and has asked for input. So, my question is,
          > what is the best way to assess what areas we most need to improve in,
          > without shelling out the big bucks to bring in some outside consultant?



          --
          Best regards,
          Chet Hendrickson mailto:lists@...
          Check out our upcoming CSM Plus courses @
          http://hendricksonxp.com/index.php?option=com_eventlist&Itemid=28
        • Roy Morien
          So you want to improve on the cheap ? OK ... have a few more releases per year. Integrate development and QA (big waste of money in this area now). Not sure
          Message 4 of 11 , Jul 7, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            So you want to improve 'on the cheap'?
             
            OK ... have a few more 'releases' per year. Integrate development and QA (big waste of money in this area now).
             
            Not sure what the etc. actually is  so can't help you much on that.
             
            Generally, develop your teams attitude towards 'inspect and adapt', define DONE, collaboration, learning, cooperation.
             
            Regards,
            Roy Morien
             

            To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
            From: wagner.andrew@...
            Date: Tue, 7 Jul 2009 09:12:18 -0400
            Subject: [scrumdevelopment] Assessing agility



            So, where I work, we do some things in a scrum-like manner: CI, iterations, daily standups, backlog, burndown chart, etc. And some things...not so much: only a couple of actual releases a year, separate dev and QA teams, no pairing, etc.

            On the plus side, our VP has recently said that we're going to be becoming "more scrum-like" (woohoo!) and has asked for input. So, my question is, what is the best way to assess what areas we most need to improve in, without shelling out the big bucks to bring in some outside consultant?




            Find your next place with Ninemsn property Looking for a place to rent, share or buy this winter?
          • Peter Stevens (cal)
            Hi Andrew, In your shoes, I would start with the original Nokia Test . (You might find my poll on the Nokia Test -- Is anybody really doing Scrum to be of
            Message 5 of 11 , Jul 7, 2009
            • 0 Attachment
              Hi Andrew,

              In your shoes, I would start with the original Nokia Test. (You might find my poll on the Nokia Test -- "Is anybody really doing Scrum" to be of interest as well).

              If you can score 8 of 8 on the Nokia test, you team is doing pretty good scrum, and is ready to take on the newer 'Scrum But' tests.

              Cheers,

              Peter

              Andrew Wagner wrote:

              So, where I work, we do some things in a scrum-like manner: CI, iterations, daily standups, backlog, burndown chart, etc. And some things...not so much: only a couple of actual releases a year, separate dev and QA teams, no pairing, etc.


              On the plus side, our VP has recently said that we're going to be becoming "more scrum-like" (woohoo!) and has asked for input. So, my question is, what is the best way to assess what areas we most need to improve in, without shelling out the big bucks to bring in some outside consultant?

            • George Dinwiddie
              ... What do you do in the way of retrospectives? - George -- ... * George Dinwiddie * http://blog.gdinwiddie.com Software Development
              Message 6 of 11 , Jul 7, 2009
              • 0 Attachment
                Andrew Wagner wrote:
                > On the plus side, our VP has recently said that we're going to be
                > becoming "more scrum-like" (woohoo!) and has asked for input. So, my
                > question is, what is the best way to assess what areas we most need to
                > improve in, without shelling out the big bucks to bring in some outside
                > consultant?

                What do you do in the way of retrospectives?

                - George

                --
                ----------------------------------------------------------------------
                * George Dinwiddie * http://blog.gdinwiddie.com
                Software Development http://www.idiacomputing.com
                Consultant and Coach http://www.agilemaryland.org
                ----------------------------------------------------------------------
              • Andrew Wagner
                Nice reminder. I had forgotten about that test. Actually, according to that list we re doing pretty well. There are a couple points that I d have to equivocate
                Message 7 of 11 , Jul 7, 2009
                • 0 Attachment
                  Nice reminder. I had forgotten about that test. Actually, according to that list we're doing pretty well. There are a couple points that I'd have to equivocate on a bit, but we're doing all 8 of those to some extent. 

                  On Tue, Jul 7, 2009 at 2:38 PM, Peter Stevens (cal) <peterstev@...> wrote:


                  Hi Andrew,

                  In your shoes, I would start with the original Nokia Test. (You might find my poll on the Nokia Test -- "Is anybody really doing Scrum" to be of interest as well).

                  If you can score 8 of 8 on the Nokia test, you team is doing pretty good scrum, and is ready to take on the newer 'Scrum But' tests.

                  Cheers,

                  Peter



                  Andrew Wagner wrote:

                  So, where I work, we do some things in a scrum-like manner: CI, iterations, daily standups, backlog, burndown chart, etc. And some things...not so much: only a couple of actual releases a year, separate dev and QA teams, no pairing, etc.


                  On the plus side, our VP has recently said that we're going to be becoming "more scrum-like" (woohoo!) and has asked for input. So, my question is, what is the best way to assess what areas we most need to improve in, without shelling out the big bucks to bring in some outside consultant?


                • Andrew Wagner
                  Little to nothing, at least in a formal capacity.
                  Message 8 of 11 , Jul 7, 2009
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Little to nothing, at least in a formal capacity.

                    On Tue, Jul 7, 2009 at 2:42 PM, George Dinwiddie <lists@...> wrote:

                    What do you do in the way of retrospectives?

                    - George

                    --
                    ----------------------------------------------------------
                    * George Dinwiddie * http://blog.gdinwiddie.com
                    Software Development http://www.idiacomputing.com
                    Consultant and Coach http://www.agilemaryland.org
                    ----------------------------------------------------------


                  • juan_banda
                    I d suggest that you work on integrating your development and QA teams; following Scrum principles they should be part of a single unit: the team. In my
                    Message 9 of 11 , Jul 7, 2009
                    • 0 Attachment
                      I'd suggest that you work on integrating your development and QA teams; following Scrum principles they should be part of a single unit: the team. In my experience getting developers and QAs is not an easy tasks, each team always tries to underestimate the other. However, if you succeed on this, the results will be tremendous. Remember that communication is key in Scrum and for this only a team should exist.

                      Second recommendation would be to have a clear definition of done, this will impact in your team's perception of the potentially shippable product which is time is crucial in Scrum.

                      Regards,

                      Juan

                      --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Andrew Wagner <wagner.andrew@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > So, where I work, we do some things in a scrum-like manner: CI, iterations,
                      > daily standups, backlog, burndown chart, etc. And some things...not so much:
                      > only a couple of actual releases a year, separate dev and QA teams, no
                      > pairing, etc.
                      > On the plus side, our VP has recently said that we're going to be becoming
                      > "more scrum-like" (woohoo!) and has asked for input. So, my question is,
                      > what is the best way to assess what areas we most need to improve in,
                      > without shelling out the big bucks to bring in some outside consultant?
                      >
                    • George Dinwiddie
                      Perhaps, then, that s your best way to assess what areas we most need to improve in. You might want to consider doing them with the team, but also with the
                      Message 10 of 11 , Jul 7, 2009
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Perhaps, then, that's your "best way to assess what areas we most need
                        to improve in." You might want to consider doing them with the team,
                        but also with the higher ranking stakeholders such as the VP you mention.

                        I've collected some pointers at
                        http://idiacomputing.com/moin/IntrospectionAndRetrospectives that might
                        be of use.

                        - George

                        Andrew Wagner wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        > Little to nothing, at least in a formal capacity.
                        >
                        > On Tue, Jul 7, 2009 at 2:42 PM, George Dinwiddie
                        > <lists@... <mailto:lists@...>> wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        > What do you do in the way of retrospectives?
                        >

                        --
                        ----------------------------------------------------------------------
                        * George Dinwiddie * http://blog.gdinwiddie.com
                        Software Development http://www.idiacomputing.com
                        Consultant and Coach http://www.agilemaryland.org
                        ----------------------------------------------------------------------
                      • Peter Stevens (calendar)
                        Hi Andrew, ... Yep! For a litmus test, it s amazing how hard it can be to decide is it pink or purple! Been there :-) But in any case, you re off to a good
                        Message 11 of 11 , Jul 8, 2009
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Hi Andrew,

                          > There are a couple points that I'd have to equivocate on a bit...

                          Yep! For a litmus test, it's amazing how hard it can be to decide is it pink or purple! Been there :-)

                          But in any case, you're off to a good start. At this point, I would suggest remembering two principles:
                          1. Inspect and Adapt
                          2. Self-organization
                          These principles represent the core of Scrum. Do them consistently and the rest will take care of itself.

                          Silvan Mühleman, CTO of Tilllate.com, talked about his experience introducing Scrum. He said, "I was fascinated by Scrum, but didn't feel it would work for my company." So he cut a lot which would be considered cannon on this list (e.g. timeboxed sprints yes,  fixed length sprints no(!), stand-ups twice per week) but stayed true to inspect and adapt. Surprisingly, this brought him to a process which looks much more like 'Scrum by the book' than he thought it would when he started. Among other things, he quickly realized the value of a daily scrum. After a few months, it was clear that proper retrospectives were a good thing. Now,  after 6 months he is starting to see the value of fixed length sprints.

                          So if something is not working, inspect it, ask the team, change it, do it for a while, inspect it again. Repeat until happy :-)

                          Cheers,

                          Peter


                          Andrew Wagner schrieb:

                          Nice reminder. I had forgotten about that test. Actually, according to that list we're doing pretty well. There are a couple points that I'd have to equivocate on a bit, but we're doing all 8 of those to some extent. 

                          On Tue, Jul 7, 2009 at 2:38 PM, Peter Stevens (cal) <peterstev@gmail. com> wrote:


                          Hi Andrew,

                          In your shoes, I would start with the original Nokia Test. (You might find my poll on the Nokia Test -- "Is anybody really doing Scrum" to be of interest as well).

                          If you can score 8 of 8 on the Nokia test, you team is doing pretty good scrum, and is ready to take on the newer 'Scrum But' tests.

                          Cheers,

                          Peter



                          Andrew Wagner wrote:

                          So, where I work, we do some things in a scrum-like manner: CI, iterations, daily standups, backlog, burndown chart, etc. And some things...not so much: only a couple of actual releases a year, separate dev and QA teams, no pairing, etc.


                          On the plus side, our VP has recently said that we're going to be becoming "more scrum-like" (woohoo!) and has asked for input. So, my question is, what is the best way to assess what areas we most need to improve in, without shelling out the big bucks to bring in some outside consultant?




                          -- 
                          Peter Stevens, CSM, CSP
                          Ken Schwaber CSM Training in Zürich: www.tinyurl.com/Ken-in-ZH
                          www.scrum-breakfast.com
                          tel: +41 44 586 6450 
                          
                        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.