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Re: [scrumdevelopment] Agile/Scrum/Lean for hardware

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  • Peter Stevens
    Hi Joe, Well, I have a customer who asked same . The hardest thing thing to get a grip on is what should the product backlog contain? Hardware doesn t break
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 1, 2009
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      Hi Joe,

      Well, I have a customer who asked same . The hardest thing thing to get
      a grip on is what should the product backlog contain? Hardware doesn't
      break down so easily into features that can be implemented incrementally...

      Cheers,

      Peter

      Joseph Little wrote:
      >
      >
      > Hi,
      >
      > I have a client that is concerned about how applicable Agile is for
      > hardware. Do you have experience?
      >
      > Please also cross-post any replies to here:
      > AgileBusiness@yahoogroups.com
      >
      > I won't reveal yet exactly what kind of hardware. It is hardware the
      > includes firmware and software before delivery as a product.
      >
      > My client is particularly looking for people who have done this, their
      > experiences, and what worked and maybe did not work from
      > Agile/Scrum/Lean. Color them reasonable skeptics.
      >
      > Thanks, Joe
      >
      >
      >
      > Joseph Little
      > Agile Coach, MBA, CST
      > Kitty Hawk Consulting, Inc.
      > 704-376-8881 (Charlotte)
      > 917-887-1669 (cell)
      > http://www.kittyhawkconsulting.com/
      > <http://www.kittyhawkconsulting.com/> http://leanagiletraining.com
      > <http://leanagiletraining.com/>Blog: Agile & Business (Google that)
      >
      >
    • Kurt Häusler
      Depends on whether you were talking about the design, or the manufacture of hardware, and what sort of hardware. Incremental and iterative development of
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 1, 2009
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        Depends on whether you were talking about the design, or the manufacture
        of hardware, and what sort of hardware.

        Incremental and iterative development of software basically relies on
        the fact that software differs from hardware in that its less expensive
        to change, and demonstratable exemplars of the current design state are
        very cheap to produce, (clicking on the compile button and waiting a few
        weeks vs sending plans off to the workshop and waiting days or weeks for
        something physical to demonstrate.)

        If you are making simple electronic hardware devices, you can possibly
        effectively use the prototyping boards (basically circuit boards that
        are wired together with moveable wires rather than printed) to present
        the latest iteration of a product, albeit in functional prototype form
        rather than "done done". Or perhaps a each iteration could present
        several prototypes, the electronic team could produce a functional but
        ugly prototype, and the design team could produce a nice looking empty
        case each iteration, if the production of one-off design prototypes are
        not too expensive. I have worked for a company making powerline modems,
        and the electronic developers were able to demonstrate functionality,
        and help test firmware and software with their prototype boards
        basically on demand.

        Development of custom chips or robotic hardware for example would (I
        imagine, I have no experience in those areas) present challenges to the
        ability to regularly demonstrate functionality.

        On the other hand, complicated hardware, like cars for example, are
        probably better suited to BDUF, or at least a lot less of an iterative
        design process than software. I have worked for a car manufacturer
        before, on a project involving on board bus systems, and I know some of
        these bus devices can be developed and demonstrated using functional
        prototypes but I have no idea how things work when it comes to the whole
        car.

        But from what I know (very little) about the development of electronic
        hardware products, your engineers should probably already know whether
        they can use hardware prototypes during development or not, and whether
        or not they can be used to regularly and frequently demonstrate
        functionality.

        If you are talking about manufacture of hardware rather than design,
        well lean has been active in that area longer than it has in software.

        Otherwise you might be better off asking in a forum more focussed on the
        specific area of relevance.

        Joseph Little wrote:
        >
        >
        > Hi,
        >
        > I have a client that is concerned about how applicable Agile is for
        > hardware. Do you have experience?
        >
        > Please also cross-post any replies to here:
        > AgileBusiness@yahoogroups.com
        >
        > I won't reveal yet exactly what kind of hardware. It is hardware the
        > includes firmware and software before delivery as a product.
        >
        > My client is particularly looking for people who have done this, their
        > experiences, and what worked and maybe did not work from
        > Agile/Scrum/Lean. Color them reasonable skeptics.
        >
        > Thanks, Joe
        >
        >
        >
        > Joseph Little
        > Agile Coach, MBA, CST
        > Kitty Hawk Consulting, Inc.
        > 704-376-8881 (Charlotte)
        > 917-887-1669 (cell)
        > http://www.kittyhawkconsulting.com/
        > <http://www.kittyhawkconsulting.com/> http://leanagiletraining.com
        > <http://leanagiletraining.com/>Blog: Agile & Business (Google that)
        >
        >
      • Kurt Häusler
        ... Clicking on the compile button and waiting seconds I meant of course...
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 1, 2009
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          Kurt Häusler wrote:
          >
          > exemplars of the current design state are very cheap to produce,
          > (clicking on the compile button and waiting a few weeks vs sending
          > plans off to the workshop and waiting
          Clicking on the compile button and waiting seconds I meant of course...
        • Mark Levison
          Hi - Joe - I don t have any direct experience in this myself. However responding to questions from my brother in law and a friend I did a survey in December:
          Message 4 of 5 , Jun 1, 2009
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            Hi - Joe - I don't have any direct experience in this myself. However responding to questions from my brother in law and a friend I did a survey in December: http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2008/12/agile-for-hardware-and-embedded-systems.html

            From what I can see the hardware side approaches the limits of anyones current experience.

            If you have an interesting Lean/Agile Embedded/Hardware stories - I might know of a place or two that would be interested in an article.

            Cheers
            Mark

            On Sun, May 31, 2009 at 9:43 PM, Joseph Little <jhlittle@...> wrote:


            Hi,

            I have a client that is concerned about how applicable Agile is for hardware.  Do you have experience?

            Please also cross-post any replies to here:  AgileBusiness@yahoogroups.com

            I won't reveal yet exactly what kind of hardware. It is hardware the includes firmware and software before delivery as a product.

            My client is particularly looking for people who have done this, their experiences, and what worked and maybe did not work from Agile/Scrum/Lean.  Color them reasonable skeptics.

            Thanks, Joe



            Joseph Little
            Agile Coach, MBA, CST
            Kitty Hawk Consulting, Inc.
            704-376-8881 (Charlotte)
            917-887-1669 (cell)
            http://www.kittyhawkconsulting.com/
            http://leanagiletraining.com
            Blog: Agile & Business (Google that)



            Mark Levison - Agile/Lean Transition Coach ||Agile Editor @ InfoQ ||
            613-862-2538 (cell) || Twitter || Blog Recent Entries:
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