Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [scrumdevelopment] Chickens and pigs - Agile needs to find less deprecating terms

Expand Messages
  • Peter Stevens (calendar)
    ... Hi Adam, I first heard a variation on the pig and chicken joke around late 1992 or early 1993. I didn t hear about Scrum until 2005. I seriously doubt this
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 28, 2009
      Adam Sroka wrote:
      It's really annoying. I don't think it will ever go away though. There
      are enough folks out there who know almost nothing about Scrum but
      still know about the stupid "Chickens and Pigs" thing. It reached
      critical mass long ago and isn't going anywhere.

      Hi Adam,

      I first heard a variation on the pig and chicken joke around late 1992 or early 1993. I didn't hear about Scrum until 2005. I seriously doubt this metaphor was invented for Scrum.

      I think maybe continuing the sports example: "Players and Fans" "Players and Spectators" or maybe "Players and Hooligans"? The job of the Scrum Master is to prevent the Spectators from becoming Hooligans. Hooligans can make a real mess of a good game, just like chickens can do the same to good project. Hmm.

      BTW - Don't you mean Animal Farm?. All animals are equal, but some animals (the pigs) are more equal than others.

      Cheers,

      Peter




      On Mon, Apr 27, 2009 at 10:54 AM, <quinton@serv. net> wrote:
      >
      >
      > In the Book "Animal House" the pig character has a different meaning.
      >
      > I think the joke is good, but the daily calling people "Chickens and Pigs"
      > could be considered harassment.
      >

      Not sure about that, though I've been warned about telling my
      coworkers I am going to eat them (Worse yet, my boss hates in when I
      tell him to "eat me.") :D

      > When someone says "can't they take a joke"  -  well,  that's what Bullies
      > always say - but that is no longer a valid defense.
      >
      > Scrum needs to find new terminology - the Agile process is supposed to
      > easily drop off old stuff that is no longer working, and bring on new.
      >
      > Leaving this alone is just like Developers and QA saying "but we've always
      > done it that way, and it worked fine before. . . "
      >
      > That this topic comes up so often is proof it is not working fine for
      > everyone.
      >





      -- 
      Peter Stevens, CSM, CSP
      http://tinyurl.com/Scrum-In-House-Training
      http://scrum-breakfast.com
      tel: +41 44 586 6450
      
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.