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RE: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Evaluating Business merits of User stories

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  • McMaster, Arleen
    No Problem. Have a Happy Easter. ________________________________ From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
    Message 1 of 21 , Apr 9 2:17 PM
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      No Problem. Have a Happy Easter.


      From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Raffi Simon
      Sent: Thursday, April 09, 2009 5:12 PM
      To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Evaluating Business merits of User stories

      sorry for the email replyed to the wrong email.


      From: Raffi Simon <raff_90@yahoo. com>
      To: scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com
      Sent: Thursday, April 9, 2009 2:10:27 PM
      Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Evaluating Business merits of User stories

      Are you available now to talk?


      From: davenicolette <dnicolet@hotmail. com>
      To: scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com
      Sent: Thursday, April 9, 2009 6:30:33 AM
      Subject: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Evaluating Business merits of User stories

      You've gotten so many good responses already, I hope my 2 cents will be helpful.

      It sounds as if your question is posed from the point of view of an individual PO who has responsibility for several projects. Keeping that in mind, and trying not to extrapolate the question to enterprise-wide scope or industy-wide generalizations, I think what "business merit" means in context is just a subjective judgment on the part of the user community about which features are more important to them. So, it's really a limited subset of the broader topic of "business value" or "business merit."

      For this sort of thing, I've found a couple of tools helpful. One has been suggested already - the variation on Planning Poker. That's a great way to help stakeholders focus on the question. They usually start generating ideas and discussion pretty quickly. In many organizations, people aren't accustomed to thinking in those terms because they've always treated The Requirements as monolithic, such that no requirement delivers any more or less value than another.

      For actually tracking the relative "merit" of backlog items, I like to use Dan Rawsthorne's concept of Earned Business Value, described here: http://www.netobjec tives.com/ blogs/calculatin g-earned- business- value-for- an-agile- project-a- new-metric. You can chart EBV in a way the PO can use to help make decisions about prioritization and about discarding backlog items at the last responsible moment, so he/she can treat the items more like real options than like traditional "requirements. " I like these tools because they are both simple and effective.

      Sorry if someone already mentioned EBV and I just overlooked it.

      Cheers,
      Dave

      --- In scrumdevelopment@ yahoo groups. com, "Andy" <rails_nut@. ..> wrote:

      >
      > The
      question: I want to find a way so that our product owner can compare user stories from many different stakeholders, and somehow quantify the business merit, so that can be weighed up against estimated effort (story points in our case) and relative U.S. priorities determined.
      >
      > I have a feeling
      this might be covered in the 'Agile Estimating and planning' book but I can't lay my hands on the office copy at present (I have a suspicion it's holidaying in Italy with the P.O.).
      >
      > So what the group wisdom on this ?
      Ratings 1-10 ? Fibonacci point scale ? Currency (with appropriate adjustments taking into value of quick wins, etc, etc) ?
      >
      > Thanks in
      advance.
      >
      > Andy Roberts
      >
      > http://www.onesandt
      href="http://hrees.com/" target=_blank>hrees.com/
      >



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