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Re: Side Effects of Co-location?

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  • jay_conne
    Hi Roy, You raise an interesting point about introverts and teamwork. I think your final question has it right - a consequence of collaboration. In my
    Message 1 of 34 , Nov 5, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi Roy,

      You raise an interesting point about introverts and teamwork. I think
      your final question has it right - a consequence of collaboration.

      In my experience, their preferences are driven simply by their scope
      of understanding and lack of understanding. I was quite a techno-nerd
      when younger with little understanding of ideas or people, while
      things, science and math made sense to me.

      As I got older, those other dimensions have taken precedence. Now I
      find most of the bright introverts I encounter in Agile coaching
      respond positively to a clear understanding of business value that
      drives their paycheck. It's the collaboration with business and users
      that leads to understanding and respect.

      For example, a month into a project I was coaching, a VP of
      Engineering shared this story with me. He encountered a treasured
      techno-introvert at the elevator and asked him how it was going. This
      guy said that he was really liking the team interaction. The VP
      responded, "Where did Tony the introvert I know go?", to smiles all
      around. This is quite typical of what Scrum can deliver.

      On the other hand, I find its important to provide team members with
      privacy and uninterrupted focus when they need it. This can be in a
      cubicle or with sound-canceling earphones, etc. The team members can
      negotiate policies for interrupts.

      I hope that helps.

      Jay
      =====================
      Jay Conne Consulting
      www.jconne.com
      =====================


      --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Roy Morien <roymorien@...> wrote:
      >
      > I find this interesting for many reasons, but one reason that I keep
      thinking aout is that computer programmers have traditionally been
      seen as introverted, prefering to work alone, sometimes (often) almost
      anti-social, or unsociable. It was always a joke (but with a serious
      core) that the very best technical programmers had had their
      application to join the human race rejected every time. My personal
      experience from way back was that the very best programmers were
      distinctly strange in their social behaviour. This was almost an
      extreme version of the Left-brain, right brain type people
      differentiation. This view of programmers would definitely highlight
      their desire for 'caves' rather than commons.
      >
      > I think my view as expressed above is correct, at least in an
      historical context. Does this mean that programmers of today are of a
      very different chaacter than those of yester-year?
      >
      > One major, and unfortunate, aspect of this introverted, unsociable
      behaviour was their attitude to users, who were generally deemed to be
      dumb and stupid, evidenced by the fact that they could never seem to
      make up their minds about exactly what they wanted, and always kept
      asking for changes. Which of course we had to deny and refuse, because
      it screwed up our project plan. Some authors gave a lot of advice on
      'How to say No to User requests for changes'. I often saw that
      infamous little poster derived from Clint Eastwood's Dirty Harry,
      showing a Magnum pistol, with the words 'Make My Day, make one more
      change!'. This always exemplified the adversorial nature of systems
      development.
      >
      > So have programmers' characters changed and they are happier with
      colocation and collaboration now, or has colocation brought about the
      change?
      >
      > Regards,
      > Roy Morien
      >
      >
      >
      > To: scrumdevelopment@...: fmengue@...: Mon, 22 Sep 2008 15:23:29
      -0300Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Side Effects of Co-location?
      >
      >
      > Hi,I have two development teams sharing the same space. Side
      effects:- Noise. Several people like to talk some dB above the
      average.Sometimes somebody does a "shhh" to remind people that there
      areothers working :).- Air conditioning. Some people like it cold,
      some like it hot.- Transparency. Everybody knows when something is
      happening.- Resistace. The "old" way of work made possible not have to
      interactdirectly with others and show your weaknesses. People don't
      like to bein that position.- Personalities differences. You have
      active people, passive people,people that think that "if there's no
      boss, I'm the boss !"... Becauseof those, we had some discussions in
      the beginning, I had to talk tosome people, and others changed their
      table's position. We're OK now:).On the other hand, the positive
      effects:- Transparency. Same reason above.- The team know themselves a
      lot better now. "So, you have 2 kids ?","Hey, I love Tom Waits too !"-
      People are helping each other much more than before. I think thatthis
      is due to the previous line.- You can have a meeting set up in 5
      seconds.One detail: I am an introverted guy, and as a manager, this is
      not avery good attribute. When we decided to try SCRUM, I took a
      course ofSM, talked to my boss, gave up my office and move to the "big
      room".Now I'm in the middle of the team, acting strictly as SM. I
      think thisis helping, so far :).Fábio.On Fri, Sep 19, 2008 at 12:29
      PM, Mark Levison <mlevison@...> wrote:> One group of teams that I'm
      coaching is considering moving from cubicles,> with developers
      scattered about the floor to a co-located environment.> Management
      understand the productivity benefits and are interested in the>
      change. However there are a group of outstanding questions:> - Are
      there side effects?> - Setting expectations - how long do most teams
      take to get used to this?> - Do you find that there are developers who
      refuse to make the change?> - Are there other settling issues that you
      experienced?> The answers will help us plan a transition so that the
      developers feel> comfortable with the change. BTW Clearly the
      developers will be involved in> the decision making process.> Cheers>
      Mark> ---------------------------------------------------------->
      Blog: http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/> One Year of Scrum: Lessons
      Learned>
      http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/10/one-year-of-scr.html>
      Aperture vs. Lightroom - best comparisons>
      http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/02/aperture_vs_lig.html>
      Customer Retention Department - Vonage Customer Service Sucks>
      http://www.notesfromatooluser.com/2007/06/customer_retent.html> -- --
      Fábio Menguefmengue at gmail dot comTobacco is my favorite vegetable.
      - ZappaLarguei a bebida. O ruim é que não lembro onde. - BadáI'll be
      sorry in the morning... - Eu
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > _________________________________________________________________
      > Are you paid what you're worth? Find out: SEEK Salary Centre
      >
      http://a.ninemsn.com.au/b.aspx?URL=http%3A%2F%2Fninemsn%2Eseek%2Ecom%2Eau%2Fcareer%2Dresources%2Fsalary%2Dcentre%2F%3Ftracking%3Dsk%3Ahet%3Asc%3Anine%3A0%3Ahot%3Atext&_t=764565661&_r=OCT07_endtext_salary&_m=EXT
      >
    • Roy Morien
      Thanks Jay. An interesting response. I do tend to agree with you, that things have changed somewhat ... not enough I would suggest, but certainly a long way
      Message 34 of 34 , Nov 6, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        Thanks Jay. An interesting response. I do tend to agree with you, that things have changed somewhat ... not enough I would suggest, but certainly a long way from prior times.
         
        Regards,
        Roy Morien




        To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
        From: jay@...
        Date: Wed, 5 Nov 2008 15:59:01 +0000
        Subject: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Side Effects of Co-location?


        Hi Roy,

        You raise an interesting point about introverts and teamwork. I think
        your final question has it right - a consequence of collaboration.

        In my experience, their preferences are driven simply by their scope
        of understanding and lack of understanding. I was quite a techno-nerd
        when younger with little understanding of ideas or people, while
        things, science and math made sense to me.

        As I got older, those other dimensions have taken precedence. Now I
        find most of the bright introverts I encounter in Agile coaching
        respond positively to a clear understanding of business value that
        drives their paycheck. It's the collaboration with business and users
        that leads to understanding and respect.

        For example, a month into a project I was coaching, a VP of
        Engineering shared this story with me. He encountered a treasured
        techno-introvert at the elevator and asked him how it was going. This
        guy said that he was really liking the team interaction. The VP
        responded, "Where did Tony the introvert I know go?", to smiles all
        around. This is quite typical of what Scrum can deliver.

        On the other hand, I find its important to provide team members with
        privacy and uninterrupted focus when they need it. This can be in a
        cubicle or with sound-canceling earphones, etc. The team members can
        negotiate policies for interrupts.

        I hope that helps.

        Jay
        ============ =========
        Jay Conne Consulting
        www.jconne.com
        ============ =========

        --- In scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com, Roy Morien <roymorien@. ..> wrote:
        >
        > I find this interesting for many reasons, but one reason that I keep
        thinking aout is that computer programmers have traditionally been
        seen as introverted, prefering to work alone, sometimes (often) almost
        anti-social, or unsociable. It was always a joke (but with a serious
        core) that the very best technical programmers had had their
        application to join the human race rejected every time. My personal
        experience from way back was that the very best programmers were
        distinctly strange in their social behaviour. This was almost an
        extreme version of the Left-brain, right brain type people
        differentiation. This view of programmers would definitely highlight
        their desire for 'caves' rather than commons.
        >
        > I think my view as expressed above is correct, at least in an
        historical context. Does this mean that programmers of today are of a
        very different chaacter than those of yester-year?
        >
        > One major, and unfortunate, aspect of this introverted, unsociable
        behaviour was their attitude to users, who were generally deemed to be
        dumb and stupid, evidenced by the fact that they could never seem to
        make up their minds about exactly what they wanted, and always kept
        asking for changes. Which of course we had to deny and refuse, because
        it screwed up our project plan. Some authors gave a lot of advice on
        'How to say No to User requests for changes'. I often saw that
        infamous little poster derived from Clint Eastwood's Dirty Harry,
        showing a Magnum pistol, with the words 'Make My Day, make one more
        change!'. This always exemplified the adversorial nature of systems
        development.
        >
        > So have programmers' characters changed and they are happier with
        colocation and collaboration now, or has colocation brought about the
        change?
        >
        > Regards,
        > Roy Morien
        >
        >
        >
        > To: scrumdevelopment@ ...: fmengue@...: Mon, 22 Sep 2008 15:23:29
        -0300Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Side Effects of Co-location?
        >
        >
        > Hi,I have two development teams sharing the same space. Side
        effects:- Noise. Several people like to talk some dB above the
        average.Sometimes somebody does a "shhh" to remind people that there
        areothers working :).- Air conditioning. Some people like it cold,
        some like it hot.- Transparency. Everybody knows when something is
        happening.- Resistace. The "old" way of work made possible not have to
        interactdirectly with others and show your weaknesses. People don't
        like to bein that position.- Personalities differences. You have
        active people, passive people,people that think that "if there's no
        boss, I'm the boss !"... Becauseof those, we had some discussions in
        the beginning, I had to talk tosome people, and others changed their
        table's position. We're OK now:).On the other hand, the positive
        effects:- Transparency. Same reason above.- The team know themselves a
        lot better now. "So, you have 2 kids ?","Hey, I love Tom Waits too !"-
        People are helping each other much more than before. I think thatthis
        is due to the previous line.- You can have a meeting set up in 5
        seconds.One detail: I am an introverted guy, and as a manager, this is
        not avery good attribute. When we decided to try SCRUM, I took a
        course ofSM, talked to my boss, gave up my office and move to the "big
        room".Now I'm in the middle of the team, acting strictly as SM. I
        think thisis helping, so far :).Fábio.On Fri, Sep 19, 2008 at 12:29
        PM, Mark Levison <mlevison@.. .> wrote:> One group of teams that I'm
        coaching is considering moving from cubicles,> with developers
        scattered about the floor to a co-located environment. > Management
        understand the productivity benefits and are interested in the>
        change. However there are a group of outstanding questions:> - Are
        there side effects?> - Setting expectations - how long do most teams
        take to get used to this?> - Do you find that there are developers who
        refuse to make the change?> - Are there other settling issues that you
        experienced? > The answers will help us plan a transition so that the
        developers feel> comfortable with the change. BTW Clearly the
        developers will be involved in> the decision making process.> Cheers>
        Mark> ------------ --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- ->
        Blog: http://www.notesfro matooluser. com/> One Year of Scrum: Lessons
        Learned>
        http://www.notesfro matooluser. com/2007/ 10/one-year- of-scr.html>
        Aperture vs. Lightroom - best comparisons>
        http://www.notesfro matooluser. com/2007/ 02/aperture_ vs_lig.html>
        Customer Retention Department - Vonage Customer Service Sucks>
        http://www.notesfro matooluser. com/2007/ 06/customer_ retent.html> -- --
        Fábio Menguefmengue at gmail dot comTobacco is my favorite vegetable.
        - ZappaLarguei a bebida. O ruim é que não lembro onde. - BadáI'll be
        sorry in the morning... - Eu
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
        > Are you paid what you're worth? Find out: SEEK Salary Centre
        >
        http://a.ninemsn. com.au/b. aspx?URL= http%3A%2F% 2Fninemsn% 2Eseek%2Ecom% 2Eau%2Fcareer% 2Dresources% 2Fsalary% 2Dcentre% 2F%3Ftracking% 3Dsk%3Ahet% 3Asc%3Anine% 3A0%3Ahot% 3Atext&_t= 764565661& _r=OCT07_ endtext_salary& _m=EXT
        >




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