Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [scrumdevelopment] Interesting Issue: Customer cares about design details.

Expand Messages
  • Ron Jeffries
    Hello, Peter. On Monday, November 3, 2008, at 6:08:14 AM, you ... Well, as mentioned, I m not there. However ... The client, who is paying for this project,
    Message 1 of 41 , Nov 3, 2008
      Hello, Peter. On Monday, November 3, 2008, at 6:08:14 AM, you
      wrote:

      > Ron Jeffries wrote:
      >> To tolerate a problem is to insist on it...

      > So you would like me to propose a solution to help you tolerate the
      > problem. Hmm.

      > Who is asking for this solution (role, not names) and why do they want
      > it? And why are they unwilling to consider an alternative which is in
      > their own interests?

      Well, as mentioned, I'm not there. However ...

      The client, who is paying for this project, has this concern.
      They are in a distant city and do not have staff who can spend
      dedicated time to work this issue. And yet, they have a legitimate
      concern.

      Ron Jeffries
      www.XProgramming.com
      www.xprogramming.com/blog
      Know what I pray for? The strength to change what I can, the inability to
      accept what I can't and the incapacity to tell the difference. --Calvin and Hobbes
    • Adrian Howard
      On 4 Nov 2008, at 02:22, Ron Jeffries wrote: [snip] ... I dunno if I missed this earlier in the thread - but the first thing that would occur to me in this
      Message 41 of 41 , Nov 6, 2008
        On 4 Nov 2008, at 02:22, Ron Jeffries wrote:
        [snip]
        > Well "properly structured" is something that cannot be defined by
        > any coding standard that I know of, which was, if I understood it,
        > your first suggestion.
        >
        > The things that matter in a design, in my opinion, are what the
        > objects are, how cohesive are they, how coupled. What are the
        > interfaces, things like that. None of those are able to be nailed
        > down by coding standards as far as I know.

        I dunno if I missed this earlier in the thread - but the first thing
        that would occur to me in this situation would be to sit down with the
        customer and have a conversation that started something like

        "Cool - can we have a chat about what you like/dislike about the code
        design? What you'll be looking for in the reviews? Maybe with some
        good/bad examples?"

        Maybe write up a summary of that conversation (I'm thinking bullet
        point poster for the team room wall - not 200 page style guide). Maybe
        use that as the starting point for the conversation once the next set
        of feedback comes in. Then see what happens.

        Cheers,

        Adrian
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.