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Re: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Prioritization

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  • George Dinwiddie
    ... Robert, it sounds to me that you re describing someone who has too much to do effectively. Perhaps that person should re-examine their role in all of the
    Message 1 of 224 , Nov 2, 2008
      Robert Biddle wrote:
      > Ron Jeffries wrote:
      > > If they're as busy as you say, they need to be somewhere working.
      > > Might as well be somewhere near by.
      >
      > Except that most of their work involves other
      > people. Users. Marketers. Financers. Other stakeholders critical
      > to the success of the project. Who are not nearby. Often not even
      > nearby each other. This is the difficultly.

      Robert, it sounds to me that you're describing someone who has too much
      to do effectively. Perhaps that person should re-examine their role in
      all of the things they do, with an eye to seeing where they have made
      themselves a bottleneck rather than a facilitator.

      - George

      --
      ----------------------------------------------------------------------
      * George Dinwiddie * http://blog.gdinwiddie.com
      Software Development http://www.idiacomputing.com
      Consultant and Coach http://www.agilemaryland.org
      ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    • Doug Swartz
      ... XP differs from kanban in many of the same ways as Scrum. It is batch pull, not continuous pull. Instead of a sprint, XP calls it an iteration. In XP, like
      Message 224 of 224 , Nov 19, 2008
        Wednesday, November 19, 2008, 3:05:08 PM, Dillon Weyer wrote:

        > In this case how is XP different to Kanban then?

        XP differs from kanban in many of the same ways as Scrum. It
        is batch pull, not continuous pull. Instead of a sprint, XP
        calls it an iteration. In XP, like scrum, but not kanban, each
        story has a high level estimate attached to it during release
        planning, which is similar, but somewhat different from
        backlog grooming in scrum.

        Doug Swartz


        > aacockburn wrote

        > --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
        > <mailto:scrumdevelopment%40yahoogroups.com> , Graeme Matthew <scrum@...>
        > wrote:
        >>
        >> Whats the difference between a product backlog and kanban they both
        > act
        >> as signaling system to trigger action?
        >>
        >>

        > The kanban is continuous pull, the backlog is batch pull.

        > With the backlogs, each month you *promise* how much you'll do, and
        > pull a *batch* of items from the product to the sprint backlog.
        > You're now locked.

        > With kanban, you pull directly from the product backlog to the
        > work list, one at a time. There is no work estimate attached to the
        > item - you just work on it till you're done, then pull the next.
        > Some teams put size limits on the work list, so you can't work on
        > more than e.g. 5 items at a time.

        > That's quite a difference.

        > Alistair
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