Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [scrumdevelopment] Intro to Agile / XP / Scrum game that takes 15-20 minutes?

Expand Messages
  • Alan Dayley
    Hmm... Big audience. Give me a couple of hours to get the right description together. There was one in this email list, I think, that involves moving balls
    Message 1 of 21 , Oct 1, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      Hmm... Big audience. Give me a couple of hours to get the right
      description together. There was one in this email list, I think, that
      involves moving balls around in the team. I don't have time to dig
      for it now. I'll post back this evening.

      Alan

      On Wed, Oct 1, 2008 at 11:52 AM, Gerry Kirk <gerry@...> wrote:
      > Plone Conference 2008, a mix of software developers, integrators, some less
      > technical types.
      >
      > Not sure of audience size, I plan to pick a few out of the crowd and have
      > the rest observe. About 350 at the conf, 3 sessions going simultaneously, so
      > could be a lot or being the last session, not so many. ;)
      >
      > I would like to make this interactive, but realistically for 15-20 people
      > max.
      >
      > - Gerry
      >
      > On Wed, Oct 1, 2008 at 2:02 PM, Alan Dayley <alandd@...> wrote:
      >>
      >> Who is the audience? What is the venue like? How big will the
      >> audience be? How interactive will you be able to be? Can the
      >> audience do something or will that be too difficult?
      >>
      >> Alan
      >>
      >> On Wed, Oct 1, 2008 at 10:29 AM, Gerry Kirk <gerry@...> wrote:
      >> > Hi, I've got a presentation coming up, it's the last session slot of the
      >> > conference, so I want to try something interactive that teaches basic
      >> > concepts of Agile, Scrum or XP.
      >> >
      >> > I searched around, but couldn't find anything as short as 15-20 minutes.
      >> >
      >> > Am I out of luck?
      >> >
      >> > Thanks,
      >> > Gerry
      >> >
      >> > --
      >> > blog: http://gerrykirk.net
      >> > daily musings at http://twitter.com/gerrykirk
      >> >
      >>
      >> ------------------------------------
      >>
      >> To Post a message, send it to: scrumdevelopment@...
      >> To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
      >> scrumdevelopment-unsubscribe@...! Groups Links
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >
      >
      >
      > --
      > blog: http://gerrykirk.net
      > daily musings at http://twitter.com/gerrykirk
      >
    • Flávio Steffens de Castro
      Here: http://mudandoumapequenaempresa.blogspot.com/2008/08/dinmica-fbrica-de-avies-verso-20_07.html _____________________ Flavio Steffens de Castro ... Here:
      Message 2 of 21 , Oct 1, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        Here:

        http://mudandoumapequenaempresa.blogspot.com/2008/08/dinmica-fbrica-de-avies-verso-20_07.html
        _____________________
        Flavio Steffens de Castro


        On Wed, Oct 1, 2008 at 6:25 PM, Alan Dayley <alandd@...> wrote:

        Flavio,

        Onde esta este presentacao? I'd like to see it! Need help translating it?

        Alan



        On Wed, Oct 1, 2008 at 11:09 AM, Flávio Steffens de Castro
        <flavio.steffens@...> wrote:
        > Hi Gerry,
        >
        > I've made a presentation that demonstrates some of the spirit of SCRUM. It's
        > something like a "line production of paper planes". The problem is that its
        > all in portuguese... dont know if this can help you. But it works :)
        > _____________________
        > Flavio Steffens de Castro
        >
        >
        > On Wed, Oct 1, 2008 at 3:02 PM, Alan Dayley <alandd@...> wrote:
        >>
        >> Who is the audience? What is the venue like? How big will the
        >> audience be? How interactive will you be able to be? Can the
        >> audience do something or will that be too difficult?
        >>
        >> Alan
        >>
        >> On Wed, Oct 1, 2008 at 10:29 AM, Gerry Kirk <gerry@...> wrote:
        >> > Hi, I've got a presentation coming up, it's the last session slot of the
        >> > conference, so I want to try something interactive that teaches basic
        >> > concepts of Agile, Scrum or XP.
        >> >
        >> > I searched around, but couldn't find anything as short as 15-20 minutes.
        >> >
        >> > Am I out of luck?
        >> >
        >> > Thanks,
        >> > Gerry
        >> >
        >> > --
        >> > blog: http://gerrykirk.net
        >> > daily musings at http://twitter.com/gerrykirk
        >> >
        >
        >

      • Igor Maciel Macaubas
        Hi Alan, Hi Gerry The ballpoint game is perfect for your needs. Check it out here: http://kanemar.com/2008/04/07/scrum-trainers-gathering-24-the-ball-point-gam
        Message 3 of 21 , Oct 1, 2008
        • 0 Attachment

          Hi Alan, Hi Gerry

           

          The ballpoint game is perfect for your needs.

          Check it out here: http://kanemar.com/2008/04/07/scrum-trainers-gathering-24-the-ball-point-game/

          And here the PDF version: http://www.glogerconsulting.de/downloads/TheBallPointGame.pdf

           

          It was created by Boris Gloger, and is widely used as a tool to teach Scrum. You can do it really quickly: 1 minute to plan, 5 minutes to Sprint, 3 minutes to discuss the results, and then back to the beginning.

          When I was first presented to Scrum, the trainer introduced it with this game. It was really fun and we learned a lot, just like that.

          After a while, when I decided to give a quick scrum-crash course to my development team, I also used the ball point game, and it worked very well.

           

          Hope it helps.

           

          - Igor

           

           

          From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Alan Dayley
          Sent: quarta-feira, 1 de outubro de 2008 18:28
          To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Intro to Agile / XP / Scrum game that takes 15-20 minutes?

           

          Hmm... Big audience. Give me a couple of hours to get the right
          description together. There was one in this email list, I think, that
          involves moving balls around in the team. I don't have time to dig
          for it now. I'll post back this evening.

          Alan

          On Wed, Oct 1, 2008 at 11:52 AM, Gerry Kirk <gerry@...> wrote:

          > Plone Conference 2008, a mix of software developers, integrators, some
          less
          > technical types.
          >
          > Not sure of audience size, I plan to pick a few out of the crowd and have
          > the rest observe. About 350 at the conf, 3 sessions going simultaneously,
          so
          > could be a lot or being the last session, not so many. ;)
          >
          > I would like to make this interactive, but realistically for 15-20 people
          > max.
          >
          > - Gerry
          >
          > On Wed, Oct 1, 2008 at 2:02 PM, Alan Dayley <
          href="mailto:alandd%40consultpros.com">alandd@...> wrote:
          >>
          >> Who is the audience? What is the venue like? How big will the
          >> audience be? How interactive will you be able to be? Can the
          >> audience do something or will that be too difficult?
          >>
          >> Alan
          >>
          >> On Wed, Oct 1, 2008 at 10:29 AM, Gerry Kirk <
          href="mailto:gerry%40gerrykirk.net">gerry@...> wrote:
          >> > Hi, I've got a presentation coming up, it's the last session slot
          of the
          >> > conference, so I want to try something interactive that teaches
          basic
          >> > concepts of Agile, Scrum or XP.
          >> >
          >> > I searched around, but couldn't find anything as short as 15-20
          minutes.
          >> >
          >> > Am I out of luck?
          >> >
          >> > Thanks,
          >> > Gerry
          >> >
          >> > --
          >> > blog: http://gerrykirk.net
          >> > daily musings at http://twitter.com/gerrykirk
          >> >
          >>
          >> ------------------------------------
          >>
          >> To Post a message, send it to:
          href="mailto:scrumdevelopment%40eGroups.com">scrumdevelopment@...
          >> To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
          >> scrumdevelopment-unsubscribe@...!
          Groups Links
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >
          >
          >
          > --
          > blog: http://gerrykirk.net
          > daily musings at http://twitter.com/gerrykirk
          >

        • Alan Dayley
          ... Hash: SHA1 I could not find the definition of the ball passing game I am about to describe. I first saw the definition in this list or on the web
          Message 4 of 21 , Oct 1, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
            Hash: SHA1

            I could not find the definition of the ball passing game I am about to
            describe. I first saw the definition in this list or on the web
            somewhere. So, I don't take the credit. And I'm speaking from memory
            so I may get it wrong. If anyone knows correct details and who to
            credit, I'd love to learn.

            Materials:
            - - Many (50-80) small, safe play balls. Table tennis, foam, plastic or
            small rubber balls will work. Nothing large.
            - - Two buckets of the same size. All the balls in one, the other empty.
            - - A stopwatch or timer for the facilitator.

            Setup:
            - - Place one bucket on one side of the room or area and the other
            bucket on the other side.

            Goal:
            - - Move all the balls from one bucket to the other.

            Rules:
            - - Every member of the team must touch each ball at least once before
            it is placed in the destination bucket.
            - - A member of the team cannot pass the ball to any team member
            standing directly next to them. In other words, a member cannot hand
            or toss a ball to the person on directly on their left or right.
            - - Members cannot walk or move around with the balls but must stay in
            one place when working the balls. (Position the buckets such that
            this is possible.)
            - - The facilitator will time different segments of the excercize. Time
            limits must be followed.

            Execution:
            - - Describe the rules and make sure they are understood.
            - - Start the game quickly with a countdown from 10 seconds: "Everyone
            understand the rules then? Good! Start in
            10..9..8..7..6..5..4..3..2..1..Go!" Start the stopwatch.
            - - Time the team for two minutes. (Length of time can vary depending
            on the team size and other factors. However, use the same time length
            for each successive work segment.)
            - - Stop the team at two minutes and have the team count the balls that
            made it to the destination bucket.
            - - Give the team one minute to plan another work period. Time this
            minute. They can reposition themselves or do whatever they think will
            improve their work.
            - - While they are planning, move the destination balls back to the
            starting bucket so the team can concentrate on their planning.
            - - Start another two minute work period.
            - - Stop after two minutes and count the balls in the destination bucket.
            - - Repeat the one minute planning and another two minute work
            segment, as before.

            Symbolism (explained after the game):
            - - Each work period was a sprint or iteration
            - - Moving the balls to the destination bucket was the sprint goal each sprint
            - - The count of balls is the amount of work done in the sprint
            - - The rules about movement and passing the balls are the restrictions
            imposed by project requirements and the development tools
            - - The counting of the balls in the destination bucket is the sprint demo
            - - The planning period between work segments is the sprint review

            Discussion:
            - - Hopefully the team increased the number of balls in the destination
            bucket in each successive sprint. Why from sprint 1 to 2? Why from 2
            to 3?
            - - Who told the team how to get organized? Why?
            - - How was the interaction in the team in the first sprint? The
            second? The third?
            - - How did the result of each successive sprint feel?
            - - Missing parts of Scrum framework: Product Owner, Product Backlog,
            Sprint Backlog, ScrumMaster, Burndown (and other parts of team board).

            If you are doing a demo in front of 50+ people, this should be more
            visible to the audience not on the team. However, 3, two minute
            sprints + 2, one minute reviews = 8 minutes, nearly half your time.
            Not much time left for rules and other things AND talking to the
            audience. Maybe if you pre-select your participants, without them
            fully knowing the story, you can save time getting them up front and
            initially organized. Doing this in just 20 minutes or less will be
            hard.

            Alan

            -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
            Version: GnuPG v1.4.6 (GNU/Linux)

            iD8DBQFI5E+gDQw/VSQuFZYRAjGqAJoCf+vN/1TmtDWk7fhgrQhjclXu6QCeK9UR
            h8jRIlMbof+wv9PTSQ9zZDU=
            =LGRJ
            -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

            On Wed, Oct 1, 2008 at 2:28 PM, Alan Dayley <alandd@...> wrote:
            > Hmm... Big audience. Give me a couple of hours to get the right
            > description together. There was one in this email list, I think, that
            > involves moving balls around in the team. I don't have time to dig
            > for it now. I'll post back this evening.
            >
            > Alan
            >
            > On Wed, Oct 1, 2008 at 11:52 AM, Gerry Kirk <gerry@...> wrote:
            >> Plone Conference 2008, a mix of software developers, integrators, some less
            >> technical types.
            >>
            >> Not sure of audience size, I plan to pick a few out of the crowd and have
            >> the rest observe. About 350 at the conf, 3 sessions going simultaneously, so
            >> could be a lot or being the last session, not so many. ;)
            >>
            >> I would like to make this interactive, but realistically for 15-20 people
            >> max.
            >>
            >> - Gerry
            >>
            >> On Wed, Oct 1, 2008 at 2:02 PM, Alan Dayley <alandd@...> wrote:
            >>>
            >>> Who is the audience? What is the venue like? How big will the
            >>> audience be? How interactive will you be able to be? Can the
            >>> audience do something or will that be too difficult?
            >>>
            >>> Alan
            >>>
            >>> On Wed, Oct 1, 2008 at 10:29 AM, Gerry Kirk <gerry@...> wrote:
            >>> > Hi, I've got a presentation coming up, it's the last session slot of the
            >>> > conference, so I want to try something interactive that teaches basic
            >>> > concepts of Agile, Scrum or XP.
            >>> >
            >>> > I searched around, but couldn't find anything as short as 15-20 minutes.
            >>> >
            >>> > Am I out of luck?
            >>> >
            >>> > Thanks,
            >>> > Gerry
            >>> >
            >>> > --
            >>> > blog: http://gerrykirk.net
            >>> > daily musings at http://twitter.com/gerrykirk
            >>> >
            >>>
            >>> ------------------------------------
            >>>
            >>> To Post a message, send it to: scrumdevelopment@...
            >>> To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
            >>> scrumdevelopment-unsubscribe@...! Groups Links
            >>>
            >>>
            >>>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> --
            >> blog: http://gerrykirk.net
            >> daily musings at http://twitter.com/gerrykirk
            >>
            >
          • Angela Druckman
            Forgive me if I am repeating what others have said-- But my hands down favorite game for teaching Scrum principles is the Ball Point Game .  Here is one link
            Message 5 of 21 , Oct 2, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              Forgive me if I am repeating what others have said--
               
              But my hands down favorite game for teaching Scrum principles is the "Ball Point Game".  Here is one link to a description - I am sure there are others:
               
               
              I really like this game because it teaches all the principles of Scrum without overtly focusing on "concepts".  People come together and create solutions spontaneously.
               
              I especially like the version of this game that uses the "bonus round".  Essentially, for the bonus round, the leader notes how ever many ball points the team achieved in their best round (ex - 55), and then informs them that the "highest score ever" is some number larger than that (ex 89) and would the team like to try to hit that in the final round? 
               
              The number the facilitator chooses is arbitrary...and that is just the point.  The team will often "try" to hit this mythical number when, in truth, it was never based in reality to begin with.  This is a great segue into a discussion about software development schedules that are likewise based on little but fantasy--
               
                   --Angela

               

              ----- Original Message ----
              From: Gerry Kirk <gerry@...>
              To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Wednesday, October 1, 2008 10:29:05 AM
              Subject: [scrumdevelopment] Intro to Agile / XP / Scrum game that takes 15-20 minutes?

              Hi, I've got a presentation coming up, it's the last session slot of the conference, so I want to try something interactive that teaches basic concepts of Agile, Scrum or XP.

              I searched around, but couldn't find anything as short as 15-20 minutes.

              Am I out of luck?

              Thanks,
              Gerry

              --
              blog: http://gerrykirk. net
              daily musings at http://twitter. com/gerrykirk

            • Angela Druckman
              One more game I really like-- This is a great one for people who resist estimating in story points because hours are more reliable : I display a list of 10
              Message 6 of 21 , Oct 2, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                One more game I really like--
                 
                This is a great one for people who resist estimating in story points because hours are "more reliable":
                 
                I display a list of 10 things I ask people to estimate and indicate their +/- range.  These things are bascially obscure trivia obtained via the Internet, such as the average number of worldwide deaths from snakebite per year or the number of known species of shark.  I tell them the object is to get as many of the estimates correct as possible.  They estimate and we look at their estimates and the correct answers together.
                 
                Invariably, they are way off on a few (often most) and their +/- ranges are way too small.
                 
                So my question for them is why did they not make their variance ranges bigger?  And we talk about the "implied precision" that an estimate in hours gives and how, even without being told to do so, they felt pressure to choose small variance ranges.
                 
                Then we estimate another group of items but this time we use t-shirt sizes (xs, s, m, l, xl).  It might be country populations, prices of luxury items, etc.  Invariablly, the group interacts more when estimating in this fashion and they estimate quicker.  We talk about the benefits of this kind of estimation.
                 
                I think this is a useful learning tool and a fun exercise.
                 
                BTW - snakebite deaths annually: 125,000
                         species of sharks: 370
                 
                     --Angela  :)

                ----- Original Message ----
                From: Gerry Kirk <gerry@...>
                To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Wednesday, October 1, 2008 10:29:05 AM
                Subject: [scrumdevelopment] Intro to Agile / XP / Scrum game that takes 15-20 minutes?

                Hi, I've got a presentation coming up, it's the last session slot of the conference, so I want to try something interactive that teaches basic concepts of Agile, Scrum or XP.

                I searched around, but couldn't find anything as short as 15-20 minutes..

                Am I out of luck?

                Thanks,
                Gerry

                --
                blog: http://gerrykirk. net
                daily musings at http://twitter. com/gerrykirk

              • Angela Druckman
                One more game I really like-- This is a great one for people who resist estimating in story points because hours are more reliable : I display a list of 10
                Message 7 of 21 , Oct 2, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  One more game I really like--
                   
                  This is a great one for people who resist estimating in story points because hours are "more reliable":
                   
                  I display a list of 10 things I ask people to estimate and indicate their +/- range.  These things are bascially obscure trivia obtained via the Internet, such as the average number of worldwide deaths from snakebite per year or the number of known species of shark.  I tell them the object is to get as many of the estimates correct as possible.  They estimate and we look at their estimates and the correct answers together.
                   
                  Invariably, they are way off on a few (often most) and their +/- ranges are way too small.
                   
                  So my question for them is why did they not make their variance ranges bigger?  And we talk about the "implied precision" that an estimate in hours gives and how, even without being told to do so, they felt pressure to choose small variance ranges.
                   
                  Then we estimate another group of items but this time we use t-shirt sizes (xs, s, m, l, xl).  It might be country populations, prices of luxury items, etc.  Invariablly, the group interacts more when estimating in this fashion and they estimate quicker.  We talk about the benefits of this kind of estimation.
                   
                  I think this is a useful learning tool and a fun exercise.
                   
                  BTW - snakebite deaths annually: 125,000
                           species of sharks: 370
                   
                       --Angela  :)

                  ----- Original Message ----
                  From: Gerry Kirk <gerry@...>
                  To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Wednesday, October 1, 2008 10:29:05 AM
                  Subject: [scrumdevelopment] Intro to Agile / XP / Scrum game that takes 15-20 minutes?

                  Hi, I've got a presentation coming up, it's the last session slot of the conference, so I want to try something interactive that teaches basic concepts of Agile, Scrum or XP.

                  I searched around, but couldn't find anything as short as 15-20 minutes..

                  Am I out of luck?

                  Thanks,
                  Gerry

                  --
                  blog: http://gerrykirk. net
                  daily musings at http://twitter. com/gerrykirk

                • Alan Dayley
                  Now I m a bit embarrassed! I described my memory of the Ball Point Game and then today check the links that several people posted. I didn t make the
                  Message 8 of 21 , Oct 2, 2008
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Now I'm a bit embarrassed! I described my memory of the "Ball Point
                    Game" and then today check the links that several people posted. I
                    didn't make the connection till I checked the links!

                    Thanks for answering my clarification question of details and credit
                    BEFORE I asked!

                    Alan

                    On Wed, Oct 1, 2008 at 9:35 PM, Alan Dayley <alandd@...> wrote:
                    > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
                    > Hash: SHA1
                    >
                    > I could not find the definition of the ball passing game I am about to
                    > describe. I first saw the definition in this list or on the web
                    > somewhere. So, I don't take the credit. And I'm speaking from memory
                    > so I may get it wrong. If anyone knows correct details and who to
                    > credit, I'd love to learn.
                    >
                    > Materials:
                    > - - Many (50-80) small, safe play balls. Table tennis, foam, plastic or
                    > small rubber balls will work. Nothing large.
                    > - - Two buckets of the same size. All the balls in one, the other empty.
                    > - - A stopwatch or timer for the facilitator.
                    >
                    > Setup:
                    > - - Place one bucket on one side of the room or area and the other
                    > bucket on the other side.
                    >
                    > Goal:
                    > - - Move all the balls from one bucket to the other.
                    >
                    > Rules:
                    > - - Every member of the team must touch each ball at least once before
                    > it is placed in the destination bucket.
                    > - - A member of the team cannot pass the ball to any team member
                    > standing directly next to them. In other words, a member cannot hand
                    > or toss a ball to the person on directly on their left or right.
                    > - - Members cannot walk or move around with the balls but must stay in
                    > one place when working the balls. (Position the buckets such that
                    > this is possible.)
                    > - - The facilitator will time different segments of the excercize. Time
                    > limits must be followed.
                    >
                    > Execution:
                    > - - Describe the rules and make sure they are understood.
                    > - - Start the game quickly with a countdown from 10 seconds: "Everyone
                    > understand the rules then? Good! Start in
                    > 10..9..8..7..6..5..4..3..2..1..Go!" Start the stopwatch.
                    > - - Time the team for two minutes. (Length of time can vary depending
                    > on the team size and other factors. However, use the same time length
                    > for each successive work segment.)
                    > - - Stop the team at two minutes and have the team count the balls that
                    > made it to the destination bucket.
                    > - - Give the team one minute to plan another work period. Time this
                    > minute. They can reposition themselves or do whatever they think will
                    > improve their work.
                    > - - While they are planning, move the destination balls back to the
                    > starting bucket so the team can concentrate on their planning.
                    > - - Start another two minute work period.
                    > - - Stop after two minutes and count the balls in the destination bucket.
                    > - - Repeat the one minute planning and another two minute work
                    > segment, as before.
                    >
                    > Symbolism (explained after the game):
                    > - - Each work period was a sprint or iteration
                    > - - Moving the balls to the destination bucket was the sprint goal each sprint
                    > - - The count of balls is the amount of work done in the sprint
                    > - - The rules about movement and passing the balls are the restrictions
                    > imposed by project requirements and the development tools
                    > - - The counting of the balls in the destination bucket is the sprint demo
                    > - - The planning period between work segments is the sprint review
                    >
                    > Discussion:
                    > - - Hopefully the team increased the number of balls in the destination
                    > bucket in each successive sprint. Why from sprint 1 to 2? Why from 2
                    > to 3?
                    > - - Who told the team how to get organized? Why?
                    > - - How was the interaction in the team in the first sprint? The
                    > second? The third?
                    > - - How did the result of each successive sprint feel?
                    > - - Missing parts of Scrum framework: Product Owner, Product Backlog,
                    > Sprint Backlog, ScrumMaster, Burndown (and other parts of team board).
                    >
                    > If you are doing a demo in front of 50+ people, this should be more
                    > visible to the audience not on the team. However, 3, two minute
                    > sprints + 2, one minute reviews = 8 minutes, nearly half your time.
                    > Not much time left for rules and other things AND talking to the
                    > audience. Maybe if you pre-select your participants, without them
                    > fully knowing the story, you can save time getting them up front and
                    > initially organized. Doing this in just 20 minutes or less will be
                    > hard.
                    >
                    > Alan
                    >
                    > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
                    > Version: GnuPG v1.4.6 (GNU/Linux)
                    >
                    > iD8DBQFI5E+gDQw/VSQuFZYRAjGqAJoCf+vN/1TmtDWk7fhgrQhjclXu6QCeK9UR
                    > h8jRIlMbof+wv9PTSQ9zZDU=
                    > =LGRJ
                    > -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
                    >
                    > On Wed, Oct 1, 2008 at 2:28 PM, Alan Dayley <alandd@...> wrote:
                    >> Hmm... Big audience. Give me a couple of hours to get the right
                    >> description together. There was one in this email list, I think, that
                    >> involves moving balls around in the team. I don't have time to dig
                    >> for it now. I'll post back this evening.
                    >>
                    >> Alan
                    >>
                    >> On Wed, Oct 1, 2008 at 11:52 AM, Gerry Kirk <gerry@...> wrote:
                    >>> Plone Conference 2008, a mix of software developers, integrators, some less
                    >>> technical types.
                    >>>
                    >>> Not sure of audience size, I plan to pick a few out of the crowd and have
                    >>> the rest observe. About 350 at the conf, 3 sessions going simultaneously, so
                    >>> could be a lot or being the last session, not so many. ;)
                    >>>
                    >>> I would like to make this interactive, but realistically for 15-20 people
                    >>> max.
                    >>>
                    >>> - Gerry
                    >>>
                    >>> On Wed, Oct 1, 2008 at 2:02 PM, Alan Dayley <alandd@...> wrote:
                    >>>>
                    >>>> Who is the audience? What is the venue like? How big will the
                    >>>> audience be? How interactive will you be able to be? Can the
                    >>>> audience do something or will that be too difficult?
                    >>>>
                    >>>> Alan
                    >>>>
                    >>>> On Wed, Oct 1, 2008 at 10:29 AM, Gerry Kirk <gerry@...> wrote:
                    >>>> > Hi, I've got a presentation coming up, it's the last session slot of the
                    >>>> > conference, so I want to try something interactive that teaches basic
                    >>>> > concepts of Agile, Scrum or XP.
                    >>>> >
                    >>>> > I searched around, but couldn't find anything as short as 15-20 minutes.
                    >>>> >
                    >>>> > Am I out of luck?
                    >>>> >
                    >>>> > Thanks,
                    >>>> > Gerry
                    >>>> >
                    >>>> > --
                    >>>> > blog: http://gerrykirk.net
                    >>>> > daily musings at http://twitter.com/gerrykirk
                    >>>> >
                    >>>>
                    >>>> ------------------------------------
                    >>>>
                    >>>> To Post a message, send it to: scrumdevelopment@...
                    >>>> To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
                    >>>> scrumdevelopment-unsubscribe@...! Groups Links
                    >>>>
                    >>>>
                    >>>>
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>> --
                    >>> blog: http://gerrykirk.net
                    >>> daily musings at http://twitter.com/gerrykirk
                    >>>
                    >>
                    >
                  • Thomas Reynolds
                    Angela, Love both of these games, have used the ball point game successfully myself but really like the bonus round concept so I will extend my ball point game
                    Message 9 of 21 , Oct 3, 2008
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Angela,
                       
                      Love both of these games, have used the ball point game successfully myself but really like the bonus round concept so I will extend my ball point game to include this and I will also look at incorporating the story points game into by tool kit.
                       
                      Another game I have used successfully I call the knot game but it is also referred to as spaghetti.  (Thanks to Tobias Mayer for teaching it to me).  This game basically takes you through how much better it is for a team to be self managing and to work things out for themselves as opposed to being micro managed or trying to write down all requirements up front aka waterfall.
                       
                      I have a diagram that explains the game.  If anyone is interested then let me know and I can forward it.
                       
                      Tom

                      ----- Original Message ----
                      From: Angela Druckman <angela.druckman@...>
                      To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Thursday, 2 October, 2008 21:30:57
                      Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Intro to Agile / XP / Scrum game that takes 15-20 minutes?

                      One more game I really like--
                       
                      This is a great one for people who resist estimating in story points because hours are "more reliable":
                       
                      I display a list of 10 things I ask people to estimate and indicate their +/- range.  These things are bascially obscure trivia obtained via the Internet, such as the average number of worldwide deaths from snakebite per year or the number of known species of shark.  I tell them the object is to get as many of the estimates correct as possible.  They estimate and we look at their estimates and the correct answers together.
                       
                      Invariably, they are way off on a few (often most) and their +/- ranges are way too small.
                       
                      So my question for them is why did they not make their variance ranges bigger?  And we talk about the "implied precision" that an estimate in hours gives and how, even without being told to do so, they felt pressure to choose small variance ranges.
                       
                      Then we estimate another group of items but this time we use t-shirt sizes (xs, s, m, l, xl).  It might be country populations, prices of luxury items, etc.  Invariablly, the group interacts more when estimating in this fashion and they estimate quicker.  We talk about the benefits of this kind of estimation.
                       
                      I think this is a useful learning tool and a fun exercise.
                       
                      BTW - snakebite deaths annually: 125,000
                               species of sharks: 370
                       
                           --Angela  :)

                      ----- Original Message ----
                      From: Gerry Kirk <gerry@gerrykirk. net>
                      To: scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com
                      Sent: Wednesday, October 1, 2008 10:29:05 AM
                      Subject: [scrumdevelopment] Intro to Agile / XP / Scrum game that takes 15-20 minutes?

                      Hi, I've got a presentation coming up, it's the last session slot of the conference, so I want to try something interactive that teaches basic concepts of Agile, Scrum or XP.

                      I searched around, but couldn't find anything as short as 15-20 minutes..

                      Am I out of luck?

                      Thanks,
                      Gerry

                      --
                      blog: http://gerrykirk. net
                      daily musings at http://twitter. com/gerrykirk


                    • Angela Druckman
                      Yes - I like that one as well! These games might seem like just for fun or a way to provide an ice breaker but in my experience they are much more than
                      Message 10 of 21 , Oct 3, 2008
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Yes -

                        I like that one as well!  These games might seem like "just for fun" or a way to provide an ice breaker but in my experience they are much more than that.  A picture is worth a thousands words and many times people just learning about Scrum get so caught up in the details they can't see the forest for the trees.  Games and exercises are a great way to get past their preconceived notions and get them to be open to new ideas--

                             --Angela


                        ----- Original Message ----
                        From: Thomas Reynolds <tom_reynolds70@...>
                        To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Friday, October 3, 2008 3:32:06 AM
                        Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Intro to Agile / XP / Scrum game that takes 15-20 minutes?

                        Angela,
                         
                        Love both of these games, have used the ball point game successfully myself but really like the bonus round concept so I will extend my ball point game to include this and I will also look at incorporating the story points game into by tool kit.
                         
                        Another game I have used successfully I call the knot game but it is also referred to as spaghetti.  (Thanks to Tobias Mayer for teaching it to me).  This game basically takes you through how much better it is for a team to be self managing and to work things out for themselves as opposed to being micro managed or trying to write down all requirements up front aka waterfall.
                         
                        I have a diagram that explains the game.  If anyone is interested then let me know and I can forward it.
                         
                        Tom

                        ----- Original Message ----
                        From: Angela Druckman <angela.druckman@ yahoo.com>
                        To: scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com
                        Sent: Thursday, 2 October, 2008 21:30:57
                        Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Intro to Agile / XP / Scrum game that takes 15-20 minutes?

                        One more game I really like--
                         
                        This is a great one for people who resist estimating in story points because hours are "more reliable":
                         
                        I display a list of 10 things I ask people to estimate and indicate their +/- range.  These things are bascially obscure trivia obtained via the Internet, such as the average number of worldwide deaths from snakebite per year or the number of known species of shark.  I tell them the object is to get as many of the estimates correct as possible.  They estimate and we look at their estimates and the correct answers together.
                         
                        Invariably, they are way off on a few (often most) and their +/- ranges are way too small.
                         
                        So my question for them is why did they not make their variance ranges bigger?  And we talk about the "implied precision" that an estimate in hours gives and how, even without being told to do so, they felt pressure to choose small variance ranges.
                         
                        Then we estimate another group of items but this time we use t-shirt sizes (xs, s, m, l, xl).  It might be country populations, prices of luxury items, etc.  Invariablly, the group interacts more when estimating in this fashion and they estimate quicker.  We talk about the benefits of this kind of estimation.
                         
                        I think this is a useful learning tool and a fun exercise.
                         
                        BTW - snakebite deaths annually: 125,000
                                 species of sharks: 370
                         
                             --Angela  :)

                        ----- Original Message ----
                        From: Gerry Kirk <gerry@gerrykirk. net>
                        To: scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com
                        Sent: Wednesday, October 1, 2008 10:29:05 AM
                        Subject: [scrumdevelopment] Intro to Agile / XP / Scrum game that takes 15-20 minutes?

                        Hi, I've got a presentation coming up, it's the last session slot of the conference, so I want to try something interactive that teaches basic concepts of Agile, Scrum or XP.

                        I searched around, but couldn't find anything as short as 15-20 minutes..

                        Am I out of luck?

                        Thanks,
                        Gerry

                        --
                        blog: http://gerrykirk. net
                        daily musings at http://twitter. com/gerrykirk



                      • Sam Edwards
                        Hi Angela: I would be interested in receiving the diagram. Thanks in advance, Sam Edwards Manager, Product Development Office: 805 730-8282 Cell: 650 804-8156
                        Message 11 of 21 , Oct 3, 2008
                        • 0 Attachment

                          Hi Angela:

                           

                          I would be interested in receiving the diagram.  Thanks in advance,

                           

                           

                          Sam Edwards

                          Manager, Product Development

                          Office: 805 730-8282

                          Cell: 650 804-8156

                          Commission Junction, a ValueClick Company

                           

                          This email and any files included with it may contain privileged, proprietary and/or confidential information that is for the sole use of the intended recipient(s).  Any disclosure, copying, distribution, posting, or use of the information contained in or attached to this email is prohibited unless permitted by the sender.  If you have received this email in error, please immediately notify the sender via return e-mail, telephone, or fax and destroy this original transmission and its included files without reading or saving it in any manner. Thank you.

                           

                           

                           

                          From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Thomas Reynolds
                          Sent: Friday, October 03, 2008 3:32 AM
                          To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Intro to Agile / XP / Scrum game that takes 15-20 minutes?

                           

                          Angela,

                           

                          Love both of these games, have used the ball point game successfully myself but really like the bonus round concept so I will extend my ball point game to include this and I will also look at incorporating the story points game into by tool kit.

                           

                          Another game I have used successfully I call the knot game but it is also referred to as spaghetti.  (Thanks to Tobias Mayer for teaching it to me).  This game basically takes you through how much better it is for a team to be self managing and to work things out for themselves as opposed to being micro managed or trying to write down all requirements up front aka waterfall.

                           

                          I have a diagram that explains the game.  If anyone is interested then let me know and I can forward it.

                           

                          Tom

                           

                          ----- Original Message ----
                          From: Angela Druckman <angela.druckman@...>
                          To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Thursday, 2 October, 2008 21:30:57
                          Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Intro to Agile / XP / Scrum game that takes 15-20 minutes?

                          One more game I really like--

                           

                          This is a great one for people who resist estimating in story points because hours are "more reliable":

                           

                          I display a list of 10 things I ask people to estimate and indicate their +/- range.  These things are bascially obscure trivia obtained via the Internet, such as the average number of worldwide deaths from snakebite per year or the number of known species of shark.  I tell them the object is to get as many of the estimates correct as possible.  They estimate and we look at their estimates and the correct answers together.

                           

                          Invariably, they are way off on a few (often most) and their +/- ranges are way too small.

                           

                          So my question for them is why did they not make their variance ranges bigger?  And we talk about the "implied precision" that an estimate in hours gives and how, even without being told to do so, they felt pressure to choose small variance ranges.

                           

                          Then we estimate another group of items but this time we use t-shirt sizes (xs, s, m, l, xl).  It might be country populations, prices of luxury items, etc.  Invariablly, the group interacts more when estimating in this fashion and they estimate quicker.  We talk about the benefits of this kind of estimation.

                           

                          I think this is a useful learning tool and a fun exercise.

                           

                          BTW - snakebite deaths annually: 125,000

                                   species of sharks: 370

                           

                               --Angela  :)

                           

                          ----- Original Message ----
                          From: Gerry Kirk <gerry@gerrykirk. net>
                          To: scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com
                          Sent: Wednesday, October 1, 2008 10:29:05 AM
                          Subject: [scrumdevelopment] Intro to Agile / XP / Scrum game that takes 15-20 minutes?

                          Hi, I've got a presentation coming up, it's the last session slot of the conference, so I want to try something interactive that teaches basic concepts of Agile, Scrum or XP.

                          I searched around, but couldn't find anything as short as 15-20 minutes..

                          Am I out of luck?

                          Thanks,
                          Gerry

                          --
                          blog: http://gerrykirk. net
                          daily musings at http://twitter. com/gerrykirk

                           

                           

                          
                          
                          
                          This email and any files included with it may contain privileged,
                          proprietary and/or confidential information that is for the sole use
                          of the intended recipient(s).  Any disclosure, copying, distribution,
                          posting, or use of the information contained in or attached to this
                          email is prohibited unless permitted by the sender.  If you have
                          received this email in error, please immediately notify the sender
                          via return email, telephone, or fax and destroy this original transmission
                          and its included files without reading or saving it in any manner.
                          Thank you.
                          
                        • Sam Edwards
                          Hi Angela: The images you sent did not include the diagram. Could you please try again? Thanks, Sam Edwards From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                          Message 12 of 21 , Oct 3, 2008
                          • 0 Attachment

                            Hi Angela:

                             

                            The images you sent did not include the diagram.  Could you please try again?

                             

                            Thanks,

                             

                            Sam Edwards

                             

                            From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Sam Edwards
                            Sent: Friday, October 03, 2008 9:20 AM
                            To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: RE: [scrumdevelopment] Intro to Agile / XP / Scrum game that takes 15-20 minutes?

                             

                            Hi Angela:

                             

                            I would be interested in receiving the diagram.  Thanks in advance,

                             

                             

                            Sam Edwards

                            Manager, Product Development

                            Office: 805 730-8282

                            Cell: 650 804-8156

                            Commission Junction, a ValueClick Company

                             

                            This email and any files included with it may contain privileged, proprietary and/or confidential information that is for the sole use of the intended recipient(s).  Any disclosure, copying, distribution, posting, or use of the information contained in or attached to this email is prohibited unless permitted by the sender.  If you have received this email in error, please immediately notify the sender via return e-mail, telephone, or fax and destroy this original transmission and its included files without reading or saving it in any manner. Thank you.

                             

                             

                             

                            From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Thomas Reynolds
                            Sent: Friday, October 03, 2008 3:32 AM
                            To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Intro to Agile / XP / Scrum game that takes 15-20 minutes?

                             

                            Angela,

                             

                            Love both of these games, have used the ball point game successfully myself but really like the bonus round concept so I will extend my ball point game to include this and I will also look at incorporating the story points game into by tool kit.

                             

                            Another game I have used successfully I call the knot game but it is also referred to as spaghetti.  (Thanks to Tobias Mayer for teaching it to me).  This game basically takes you through how much better it is for a team to be self managing and to work things out for themselves as opposed to being micro managed or trying to write down all requirements up front aka waterfall.

                             

                            I have a diagram that explains the game.  If anyone is interested then let me know and I can forward it.

                             

                            Tom

                             

                            ----- Original Message ----
                            From: Angela Druckman <angela.druckman@...>
                            To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Thursday, 2 October, 2008 21:30:57
                            Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Intro to Agile / XP / Scrum game that takes 15-20 minutes?

                            One more game I really like--

                             

                            This is a great one for people who resist estimating in story points because hours are "more reliable":

                             

                            I display a list of 10 things I ask people to estimate and indicate their +/- range.  These things are bascially obscure trivia obtained via the Internet, such as the average number of worldwide deaths from snakebite per year or the number of known species of shark.  I tell them the object is to get as many of the estimates correct as possible.  They estimate and we look at their estimates and the correct answers together.

                             

                            Invariably, they are way off on a few (often most) and their +/- ranges are way too small.

                             

                            So my question for them is why did they not make their variance ranges bigger?  And we talk about the "implied precision" that an estimate in hours gives and how, even without being told to do so, they felt pressure to choose small variance ranges.

                             

                            Then we estimate another group of items but this time we use t-shirt sizes (xs, s, m, l, xl).  It might be country populations, prices of luxury items, etc.  Invariablly, the group interacts more when estimating in this fashion and they estimate quicker.  We talk about the benefits of this kind of estimation.

                             

                            I think this is a useful learning tool and a fun exercise.

                             

                            BTW - snakebite deaths annually: 125,000

                                     species of sharks: 370

                             

                                 --Angela  :)

                             

                            ----- Original Message ----
                            From: Gerry Kirk <gerry@gerrykirk. net>
                            To: scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com
                            Sent: Wednesday, October 1, 2008 10:29:05 AM
                            Subject: [scrumdevelopment] Intro to Agile / XP / Scrum game that takes 15-20 minutes?

                            Hi, I've got a presentation coming up, it's the last session slot of the conference, so I want to try something interactive that teaches basic concepts of Agile, Scrum or XP.

                            I searched around, but couldn't find anything as short as 15-20 minutes..

                            Am I out of luck?

                            Thanks,
                            Gerry

                            --
                            blog: http://gerrykirk. net
                            daily musings at http://twitter. com/gerrykirk

                             

                             

                              
                              
                              
                              
                            This email and any files included with it may contain privileged,
                            proprietary and/or confidential information that is for the sole use
                            of the intended recipient(s).  Any disclosure, copying, distribution,
                            posting, or use of the information contained in or attached to this
                            email is prohibited unless permitted by the sender.  If you have
                            received this email in error, please immediately notify the sender
                            via return email, telephone, or fax and destroy this original transmission
                            and its included files without reading or saving it in any manner.
                            Thank you.

                            
                            
                            
                            This email and any files included with it may contain privileged,
                            proprietary and/or confidential information that is for the sole use
                            of the intended recipient(s).  Any disclosure, copying, distribution,
                            posting, or use of the information contained in or attached to this
                            email is prohibited unless permitted by the sender.  If you have
                            received this email in error, please immediately notify the sender
                            via return email, telephone, or fax and destroy this original transmission
                            and its included files without reading or saving it in any manner.
                            Thank you.
                            
                          • Kane Mar
                            ... To add to some of the excellent points that you ve made, when I play the game, I use the bonus round in an attempt to force the team to change the system.
                            Message 13 of 21 , Oct 3, 2008
                            • 0 Attachment
                              --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Angela Druckman
                              <angela.druckman@...> wrote:
                              > The number the facilitator chooses is arbitrary...and that is just
                              > the point.  The team will often "try" to hit this mythical number
                              > when, in truth, it was never based in reality to begin with.  This
                              > is a great segue into a discussion about software development
                              > schedules that are likewise based on little but fantasy--

                              To add to some of the excellent points that you've made, when I play
                              the game, I use the bonus round in an attempt to force the team to
                              change the system.

                              Every system has it's own natural velocity (as Deming pointed out),
                              and, the only way to increase this natural velocity is to change the
                              system. I frequently encounter senior managers who simply assume that
                              the velocity can increase at a linear rate [without any changes] and
                              this simply isn't the case.

                              Finally, the bonus round also hints that every time you change the
                              system there is the possibility that the velocity will /decrease/
                              rather than increase. This is an inherent risk any time a system is
                              changed.

                              Best regards,
                              Kane Mar.
                              b: http://KaneMar.com
                              b: http://SeattleScrum.org
                              w: http://Danube.com
                            • Igor Maciel Macaubas
                              Hi All, Liked the “bonus round” concept, but I did it a little bit different. Instead of suggesting an arbitrary speed, I just changed one of the rules
                              Message 14 of 21 , Oct 4, 2008
                              • 0 Attachment

                                Hi All,

                                 

                                Liked the “bonus round” concept, but I did it a little bit different. Instead of suggesting an arbitrary speed, I just changed one of the rules when the team reached stability and predictability. For example, in the first Sprint, the team estimated 50 ball points, but really did only 35. After a few sprints, the team got better knowledge of its capacity, started to make more accurate estimates and reached a point of stability – like estimating 65 points and deliverying 67 to 70 points. So I changed one of the rules, for example, in the last Sprint I would allow the team to hand the ball to the person standing directly next to them. After that, the team usually performs way better than they used to perform (because it makes the game easier).

                                 

                                The point here is to show that once a team gets stability, the only way to make them speed it up is to change the rules of the system. Just another way to do “bonus rounding” ;-)

                                 

                                Angela,

                                 

                                Yesterday I applied the game you suggested with one of my teams, which is new to Scrum and still a little bit reticent about estimating in story points. I asked about the sanake bites, shark species, and a few more other numbers I looked up on the web, and the result was great – everybody felt that estimating using relative sizes is way more interesting, raises more questions and generates more interaction. And in the end, it’s quicker. I believe that from now on, this team will be less resistent to change. Great game, thanks for your contribution!

                                 

                                Igor

                                --

                                igor@...

                                 

                                 

                                From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Thomas Reynolds
                                Sent: sexta-feira, 3 de outubro de 2008 07:32
                                To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Intro to Agile / XP / Scrum game that takes 15-20 minutes?

                                 

                                Angela,

                                 

                                Love both of these games, have used the ball point game successfully myself but really like the bonus round concept so I will extend my ball point game to include this and I will also look at incorporating the story points game into by tool kit.

                                 

                                Another game I have used successfully I call the knot game but it is also referred to as spaghetti.  (Thanks to Tobias Mayer for teaching it to me).  This game basically takes you through how much better it is for a team to be self managing and to work things out for themselves as opposed to being micro managed or trying to write down all requirements up front aka waterfall.

                                 

                                I have a diagram that explains the game.  If anyone is interested then let me know and I can forward it.

                                 

                                Tom

                                 

                                ----- Original Message ----
                                From: Angela Druckman <angela.druckman@...>
                                To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Thursday, 2 October, 2008 21:30:57
                                Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Intro to Agile / XP / Scrum game that takes 15-20 minutes?

                                One more game I really like--

                                 

                                This is a great one for people who resist estimating in story points because hours are "more reliable":

                                 

                                I display a list of 10 things I ask people to estimate and indicate their +/- range.  These things are bascially obscure trivia obtained via the Internet, such as the average number of worldwide deaths from snakebite per year or the number of known species of shark.  I tell them the object is to get as many of the estimates correct as possible.  They estimate and we look at their estimates and the correct answers together.

                                 

                                Invariably, they are way off on a few (often most) and their +/- ranges are way too small.

                                 

                                So my question for them is why did they not make their variance ranges bigger?  And we talk about the "implied precision" that an estimate in hours gives and how, even without being told to do so, they felt pressure to choose small variance ranges.

                                 

                                Then we estimate another group of items but this time we use t-shirt sizes (xs, s, m, l, xl).  It might be country populations, prices of luxury items, etc.  Invariablly, the group interacts more when estimating in this fashion and they estimate quicker.  We talk about the benefits of this kind of estimation.

                                 

                                I think this is a useful learning tool and a fun exercise.

                                 

                                BTW - snakebite deaths annually: 125,000

                                         species of sharks: 370

                                 

                                     --Angela  :)

                                 

                                ----- Original Message ----
                                From: Gerry Kirk <gerry@gerrykirk. net>
                                To: scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com
                                Sent: Wednesday, October 1, 2008 10:29:05 AM
                                Subject: [scrumdevelopment] Intro to Agile / XP / Scrum game that takes 15-20 minutes?

                                Hi, I've got a presentation coming up, it's the last session slot of the conference, so I want to try something interactive that teaches basic concepts of Agile, Scrum or XP.

                                I searched around, but couldn't find anything as short as 15-20 minutes..

                                Am I out of luck?

                                Thanks,
                                Gerry

                                --
                                blog: http://gerrykirk. net
                                daily musings at http://twitter. com/gerrykirk

                                 

                                 

                              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.