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Re: [scrumdevelopment] Retrospective instructions?

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  • Richie Moyle
    Alan,         I tend to start with a simple flip chart with sheets (blue tacked) on the wall covering plus delta analysis :   What went well? What
    Message 1 of 34 , Sep 1 8:53 PM
      Alan,
              I tend to start with a simple flip chart with sheets (blue tacked) on the wall covering "plus delta analysis":
       
      What went well?
      What didn't go so well?
      What are we going to change (prioritised)?
       
      I start with either input from individuals (round table) for what went well, this gets the whole team involved and motivated.
      Secondly you could use the anonymous index cards to kick off what didn't go well. I like this method as it gives the team a chance to feedback on each other and more importantly, the Scrum Master.
      Finaly, pick the top 5-10 things that didn't go well and concentrate on identifying the changes you are going to make for them. If time allows, tackle the remainder.
       
      In my experience, the simpler the Retro is, the more success I have had from teams.
       
      Tip : Try holding it over a lunchtime at a restaurant (or dare I say, pub).
       
      The most important thing is to make the results visable to the team during subsequent sprints. I tend to put the flip chart sheets up around their white boards, so they can't ignore the changes they agreed to make.
       
      Hope this helps.
       
      Richie PMP CSM
      Christchurch, NZ

      --- On Tue, 2/9/08, Cory Foy <usergroup@...> wrote:
      From: Cory Foy <usergroup@...>
      Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Retrospective instructions?
      To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
      Received: Tuesday, 2 September, 2008, 3:31 AM

      Hi Alan,

      Alan Dayley wrote:
      > I waiting for the "Agile Retrospectives" book to arrive so it may be
      > the resource I'm looking for. In the mean time, I'm finding little on
      > the web to help define retrospective techniques.

      You should have purchased the PDF version directly from the Pragmatic
      Programmers site. Not too late. ;)

      > For example, many blog posts and photos mention doing a "time line"
      > retrospective or using "mad, sad, glad" or some other thing
      > structures. But few, if any, provide a definition of HOW to do "mad,
      > sad, glad" or any of the other methods. Is usually "We used and here
      > are the results...," which is fine for the blog writer's purpose but I
      > want to learn the details of the "" part.

      In my write-up, I tried to give a brief synopsis of each thing I did:

      http://www.cornetde sign.com/ 2008/07/agile- retrospectives.. html

      > One of my weaknesses is a tendency to seek complex solutions. Maybe
      > retrospective methods are so simple that I'm looking for more
      > complexity where there is none. Is there a resource of outlines of
      > how to do these different retrospective methods?

      There's the book you've already got. Bill Wake posted a good overview of
      some patterns here: http://xp123. com/xplor/ xp0509/index. shtml

      There's also the Retrospectives web site: http://www.retrospe ctives.com/

      That should get you started. I believe there is a mailing list somewhere
      as well. And if worse comes to worse, I'd be happy to answer questions
      about what we're doing.

      --
      Cory Foy
      http://www.cornetde sign.com
      http://www.agileflo rida.com


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    • James S. Fosdick, PMP, CSP
      ... It seems to me this has less to do with clever mnemonics or retrospective techniques (which are certainly useful tools) and more to do with the fact that
      Message 34 of 34 , Sep 4 11:54 AM
        --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Ron Jeffries
        <ronjeffries@...> wrote:

        > Yes. I have some dear friends who used SAMOLO and loved it. I was
        > not as impressed as they were. For reasons such as you're referring
        > to, and others, it seemed to me that important things just couldn't
        > be brought up.

        It seems to me this has less to do with clever mnemonics or
        retrospective techniques (which are certainly useful tools) and more
        to do with the fact that retrospection is not equivalent to
        introspection either individually or collectively. A tendency towards
        superficial examination of past history without a requisite amount of
        serious introspection cannot have a significant impact on future
        development. As with all things Scrum related, teams will get out of a
        retrospective whatever they put in. The trick for the ScrumMaster or
        coach is to inspire them to be more introspective individually and as
        a group. I don't think there is a mnemonic or prescriptive technique
        that provides that.
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