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Re: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Puzzled with retrospective in my team

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  • George Dinwiddie
    ... What safety practice did you follow? ... I m not familiar with any safety exercise that /promises/ safety. I only try to make explicit the level of safety
    Message 1 of 38 , Aug 29, 2008
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      kaverjody wrote:
      > --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, George Dinwiddie <lists@...>
      > wrote:
      >> Not useful in what way? Everyone was anxious to talk about anything?
      >> It seems to me the purpose of the safety exercise is to make the level
      >> of safety known explicitly, and shared by the group.
      >
      > I followed the safety practice strictly in the beginning, but later
      > members told me, how about doing some simple retrospectives, coz
      > however the purpose was to getting the actions, so I did.

      What safety practice did you follow?

      > Another reason I thought might be, even I can say those words for
      > safety, do I really can promise their safety? I am not their line
      > manager, I do not controlling anything, I can not promise I'll protect
      > them if somebody outside the team want to punish them, I can only try
      > to protect.

      I'm not familiar with any safety exercise that /promises/ safety. I
      only try to make explicit the level of safety felt by the participants.

      > Another, thought it's the retrospective facilitator, normally the
      > scrum master announces the safety words, the recessive fact is
      > everyone should agree it and _follow_ it to ensure we are safe. And in
      > my case, I feel they agreed and followed, coz I haven't found any
      > abnormal behaviours neither in the retrospective nor afterwards in the
      > sprints.
      >
      > Actually I am very curious to know why this safety part is so
      > important, coz somebody like me will say what I want to say, even it's
      > safe or not. Others may tend to protect themselves whatsoever.
      >
      > I do not know and haven't searched how this safety part is invented,
      > but I'd like to know.

      I recommend reading Agile Retrospectives by Derby & Larsen, followed by
      Project Retrospectives by Kerth. And perhaps you should describe your
      typical retrospective, as it seems somewhat different from what I
      generally envision when I use the word "retrospective."

      >> Exercises that involve everyone writing before anything is said seem to
      >> help.
      >
      > Yes, did, post-it notes were always prepared, but those introverts (or
      > perhaps not introverts, but other characters) just wait the time pass
      > by, mainly watching others to stick. I have tried to ask them directly
      > or indirectly promote them to raise notes, things changed, a little
      > bit, so I tend to believe they just do not have too much to say.
      > Perhaps they just do their job in the sprints, without keeping an eye
      > on other members or the ongoing work, so they do not have too much to say.

      Are you saying that if you ask everyone to write three to five things
      they noticed during the iteration, some people decline to do so? This
      does not sound like introversion to me. Perhaps they are not engaged in
      the project or scrum process? Perhaps they are passive-aggressive? Or
      perhaps they don't feel any safety at all?

      - George

      --
      ----------------------------------------------------------------------
      * George Dinwiddie * http://blog.gdinwiddie.com
      Software Development http://www.idiacomputing.com
      Consultant and Coach http://www.agilemaryland.org
      ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    • George Dinwiddie
      ... What safety practice did you follow? ... I m not familiar with any safety exercise that /promises/ safety. I only try to make explicit the level of safety
      Message 38 of 38 , Aug 29, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        kaverjody wrote:
        > --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, George Dinwiddie <lists@...>
        > wrote:
        >> Not useful in what way? Everyone was anxious to talk about anything?
        >> It seems to me the purpose of the safety exercise is to make the level
        >> of safety known explicitly, and shared by the group.
        >
        > I followed the safety practice strictly in the beginning, but later
        > members told me, how about doing some simple retrospectives, coz
        > however the purpose was to getting the actions, so I did.

        What safety practice did you follow?

        > Another reason I thought might be, even I can say those words for
        > safety, do I really can promise their safety? I am not their line
        > manager, I do not controlling anything, I can not promise I'll protect
        > them if somebody outside the team want to punish them, I can only try
        > to protect.

        I'm not familiar with any safety exercise that /promises/ safety. I
        only try to make explicit the level of safety felt by the participants.

        > Another, thought it's the retrospective facilitator, normally the
        > scrum master announces the safety words, the recessive fact is
        > everyone should agree it and _follow_ it to ensure we are safe. And in
        > my case, I feel they agreed and followed, coz I haven't found any
        > abnormal behaviours neither in the retrospective nor afterwards in the
        > sprints.
        >
        > Actually I am very curious to know why this safety part is so
        > important, coz somebody like me will say what I want to say, even it's
        > safe or not. Others may tend to protect themselves whatsoever.
        >
        > I do not know and haven't searched how this safety part is invented,
        > but I'd like to know.

        I recommend reading Agile Retrospectives by Derby & Larsen, followed by
        Project Retrospectives by Kerth. And perhaps you should describe your
        typical retrospective, as it seems somewhat different from what I
        generally envision when I use the word "retrospective."

        >> Exercises that involve everyone writing before anything is said seem to
        >> help.
        >
        > Yes, did, post-it notes were always prepared, but those introverts (or
        > perhaps not introverts, but other characters) just wait the time pass
        > by, mainly watching others to stick. I have tried to ask them directly
        > or indirectly promote them to raise notes, things changed, a little
        > bit, so I tend to believe they just do not have too much to say.
        > Perhaps they just do their job in the sprints, without keeping an eye
        > on other members or the ongoing work, so they do not have too much to say.

        Are you saying that if you ask everyone to write three to five things
        they noticed during the iteration, some people decline to do so? This
        does not sound like introversion to me. Perhaps they are not engaged in
        the project or scrum process? Perhaps they are passive-aggressive? Or
        perhaps they don't feel any safety at all?

        - George

        --
        ----------------------------------------------------------------------
        * George Dinwiddie * http://blog.gdinwiddie.com
        Software Development http://www.idiacomputing.com
        Consultant and Coach http://www.agilemaryland.org
        ----------------------------------------------------------------------
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