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Re: [scrumdevelopment] Company Standards (Was Re:Voting the entire team off the island)

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  • George Dinwiddie
    ... What if they used a logging framework, an app server, and a programming language that inhibited successful software development? I ve seen companies stuck
    Message 1 of 148 , Jun 30, 2008
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      woynam wrote:
      > We have anywhere from 20 to 30 teams working in parallel at any given
      > moment. How would our lives be better if each team selected a
      > different logging framework? What if they selected a different app
      > server? How about a different programming language?
      >
      > That's simply crazy talk. Someone in our community once said "Doing
      > agile is not an excuse to be stupid.".

      What if they used a logging framework, an app server, and a programming
      language that inhibited successful software development? I've seen
      companies stuck in Cobol development because "it was the standard" and
      there was no provision for experimenting with new approaches.

      > Seriously, our focus should be on providing business value to our
      > customers. I don't see how creating a hodge podge software
      > architecture provides value in the long run.

      Nor does rigidly following a standard without attempting improvement.

      > Unlike many folks, I strongly believe there is still a role for
      > architects in an agile organization. This is especially true in a
      > large organization. One of the biggest reasons why many organizations
      > struggle to achieve agility is that their systems are a complete mess.
      > Everyone doing their own thing. Everyone has a specialty, because
      > they've created a subsystem using technology that nobody else in the
      > organization understands.

      I believe that every developer should be cognizant of the architectural
      tradeoffs. And I believe that architecture is fractal--presenting
      similar issues and patterns at many levels of scale.

      What I have seen is that when "architecture" is treated as a separate
      entity from "software development," the systems are a complete mess.
      The architectural drawings are often very pretty, however.

      Having a coherent architecture requires both vision and communication.
      And that vision and communication must run throughout the organization,
      not be limited to an elite corps. And at any given time, in an
      organization of size, there will be vestiges of obsolete architecture
      and incipient sprouts of the future architecture. If not, it's going
      nowhere.

      - George

      --
      ----------------------------------------------------------------------
      * George Dinwiddie * http://blog.gdinwiddie.com
      Software Development http://www.idiacomputing.com
      Consultant and Coach http://www.agilemaryland.org
      ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    • Emiliano Heyns
      On Fri, Jun 27, 2008 at 11:36 PM, Emiliano Heyns
      Message 148 of 148 , Sep 13, 2008
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        On Fri, Jun 27, 2008 at 11:36 PM, Emiliano Heyns <Emiliano.Heyns@...> wrote:
        On Fri, Jun 27, 2008 at 4:42 PM, Ilja Preuss <it@...> wrote:
        Emiliano Heyns wrote:
        > Do I want them to behave differently... that is a very good question. I
        > think (easy to say) I would be OK with a wide variety of behaviors as
        > long as we're showing noticeable progress towards our projects' goal.

        How visible is that progress? How visible is how much needs still to be
        done to reach that goal? Is this reflected in some kind of burn chart
        that the team members believe in?

        I'm beginning to doubt this. We have something like this, but I wonder whether the value of the milestones is adequately explained, which could certainly be an issue for the new member. If not, it could explain a thing or two.

        I've been reading Jean Tabaka's book; I forgot who recommended it to me, but here's a heart-felt thank you to whoever did. I've found "a thing or two" that I should have handled very, very differently. So my apologies to this group, after the apologies already rendered to my team. We're not at the performing stage yet, but in a lot better shape than we were.

        Thanks all,
        Emile

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