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Re: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Challenge of increasing velocity - what level

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  • Don Gray
    Joe, ... I believe it can. I d like to suggest this is necessary but not sufficient. To be sufficient I d like to hear more about the environment and team
    Message 1 of 13 , Jun 2, 2008
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      Joe,

      > Jeff Sutherland says that Scrum was built to increase productivity
      > 5x to 10x.

      I believe it can. I'd like to suggest this is necessary but not
      sufficient. To be sufficient I'd like to hear more about the
      environment and team composition. I once worked with a team built by
      the "you 5 people are now a team and we'll be using Scrum" method. To
      make team dynamics more interesting one person was remotely located in
      upstate New York with the rest of the team in California. Oh, and the
      three most senior people had prior responsibilities that didn't go
      away when the team ?formed?. I worked with this team from the sprint 2
      retrospective (demo crashed and burned) through sprint 7 (or so). They
      went from abysmal results to getting close to finishing the sprint
      backlog. The ScrumMaster who followed me told me somewhere around
      sprint 10 he saw some team like behavior.

      > We need to (figuratively) grab management by the collar and say: We
      > ain't doing business as usual any more! We're serious. You have to
      > help us knock down the impediments.

      Could we say "Scrum is capable of increasing a team's productivity
      between 5x and 10x. How much improvement your teams achieve is based
      on how much you support the change including appropriate training,
      changes in the team environment and engineering practices. You decide
      how much additional value you'd like to generate."

      --
      Don (336)374-7591

      The greatest discovery of my generation is that a human being can alter his life
      by altering his attitudes of mind.
      William James

      Change your attitude by attending the AYE Conference Nov 2 - 5, 2008
      www.AYEconference.com
    • Cory Foy
      Hi Joe, ... It seems like you know or have an idea of what the improvements can lead to. At least, you seem rather confident that you can have a significant
      Message 2 of 13 , Jun 2, 2008
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        Hi Joe,

        Joseph Little wrote:
        > We need to (figuratively) grab management by the collar and say: We
        > ain't doing business as usual any more! We're serious. You have to
        > help us knock down the impediments.

        It seems like you know or have an idea of what the improvements can lead
        to. At least, you seem rather confident that you can have a significant
        improvement in the organization by helping the teams have the courage to
        remove impediments.

        To steal a little from Paul's reply - I'm picturing the following
        scenario. Let's say I have dinner with the CTO, and he is sold on Scrum.
        I mean, he really gets it. Now you are talking with the managers, and
        telling them you are going to increase velocity, or improve the team,
        etc, etc. They know there is executive buy-in, but other than keeping
        their jobs, what is the incentive for them to jump in?

        It would seem like answering that question would give you the figurative
        collar grabbing mechanism. But as you know, it's a mechanism that
        requires respect and a light hand.

        (I've done this twice on teams where the manager was the cause of or was
        the impediment. By removing emotion (but not passion!) and showing
        improvements, and timelines for improvements, I was able to make it
        work. In one case, we started under the radar, so had some concrete
        numbers to show, but in both cases the managers took it personally - as
        I would expect many of us would.)

        --
        Cory Foy
        http://www.cornetdesign.com
      • Joseph Little
        Good comments all. My added riff is this: First you must be confident yourself. And feel the challenge yourself. Then, you must have a capable team (a team
        Message 3 of 13 , Jun 3, 2008
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          Good comments all. My added riff is this:

          First you must be confident yourself. And feel the challenge yourself.
          Then, you must have a capable team (a team that can complete a Sprint
          in this specific domain). If they aren't good enough, get the effort
          canned.
          You need to show a challenging vision, where you raise more promise
          than resistance.
          Finally you need to guide them gently to getting better and better.

          Without a vision, the people perish. (I think the Bible said that.)

          I agree one can present it like a jerk or one can present it in an
          inspiring way.

          I am finding courage, and all the little blankies that enable us to
          act on our courage, are so important. And the willingness to leave
          behind the past (not hard in most of the cases I see, except that we
          became comfortable with pain).

          Regards, Joe



          --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Cory Foy <usergroup@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi Joe,
          >
          > Joseph Little wrote:
          > > We need to (figuratively) grab management by the collar and say: We
          > > ain't doing business as usual any more! We're serious. You have to
          > > help us knock down the impediments.
          >
          > It seems like you know or have an idea of what the improvements can
          lead
          > to. At least, you seem rather confident that you can have a significant
          > improvement in the organization by helping the teams have the
          courage to
          > remove impediments.
          >
          > To steal a little from Paul's reply - I'm picturing the following
          > scenario. Let's say I have dinner with the CTO, and he is sold on
          Scrum.
          > I mean, he really gets it. Now you are talking with the managers, and
          > telling them you are going to increase velocity, or improve the team,
          > etc, etc. They know there is executive buy-in, but other than keeping
          > their jobs, what is the incentive for them to jump in?
          >
          > It would seem like answering that question would give you the
          figurative
          > collar grabbing mechanism. But as you know, it's a mechanism that
          > requires respect and a light hand.
          >
          > (I've done this twice on teams where the manager was the cause of or
          was
          > the impediment. By removing emotion (but not passion!) and showing
          > improvements, and timelines for improvements, I was able to make it
          > work. In one case, we started under the radar, so had some concrete
          > numbers to show, but in both cases the managers took it personally - as
          > I would expect many of us would.)
          >
          > --
          > Cory Foy
          > http://www.cornetdesign.com
          >
        • jay_conne
          Hi Cory, I like your approach - it s about what s in it for them. The only important answer should be that they can deliver real value faster, better and
          Message 4 of 13 , Jul 1, 2008
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            Hi Cory,

            I like your approach - it's about what's in it for them. The only
            important answer should be that they can deliver real value faster,
            better and cheaper.

            If they are primarily invested in hiding their incompetence and that
            of their team in the current context, they should be fired. Anyone
            with better character will jump at the chance to achieve the results
            Agile can demonstrate.

            Let me also say that my reference to incompetence of their team is not
            to blame the team. As Deming and Poppendieck write - it's usually
            about the system and not the individuals that are often victims of a
            dysfunctional system.

            Jay

            In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Cory Foy <usergroup@...> wrote:
            > ... Let's say I have dinner with the CTO, and he is sold on Scrum.
            > I mean, he really gets it. Now you are talking with the managers,
            and telling them you are going to increase velocity, or improve the
            team, etc, etc. They know there is executive buy-in, but other than
            keeping their jobs, what is the incentive for them to jump in?
            >
            > It would seem like answering that question would give you the
            figurative collar grabbing mechanism. But as you know, it's a
            mechanism that requires respect and a light hand.
            >
            > (I've done this twice on teams where the manager was the cause of or
            was the impediment. By removing emotion (but not passion!) and showing
            improvements, and timelines for improvements, I was able to make it
            work. In one case, we started under the radar, so had some concrete
            numbers to show, but in both cases the managers took it personally -
            as I would expect many of us would.)
            >
            > --
            > Cory Foy
            > http://www.cornetdesign.com
            >
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