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Re: [scrumdevelopment] A leap of faith and how to convince people to jump...

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  • Ilja Preuss
    ... Can you give an example of such a conversation? Have you asked them what they d need to be excited about doing this? Have you asked them what they d really
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 1, 2008
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      David H. wrote:
      >> Perhaps there is a very good reason why the "people on the floor"
      >> haven't got faith.
      >
      > Very good, what would you suggest to do to find out. Because every
      > conversation I am having seems to revolve around the fact that people
      > say "yepp I think we could do it" but no one stand sup and says "let's
      > do it".

      Can you give an example of such a conversation?

      Have you asked them what they'd need to be excited about doing this?

      Have you asked them what they'd really like to do?

      What (do they believe) happens if they fail?

      > I am sorry but that does not work all the time. There are business
      > decisions on a strategic level which need to be taken into account as
      > well. I feel it is my job to faciltate this understanding so that the
      > people commiting can make the right decision. Once I have facilitated
      > that knoweldge and they still choose to use the old, slightly broken
      > but proven technology, then so be it.

      Could it be that they feel pressed to use the new technology - however
      subtly?

      Have you ever told them that you will support any decision they come up
      with on this?

      Curious, Ilja

      PS: You might want to look into "Powerful Questions"...
    • Petri Heiramo
      Hi David, I believe that in order to have this leap of faith , you need to change the perspective from how you can instill the belief to what do the
      Message 2 of 7 , Jun 2, 2008
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        Hi David,


        I believe that in order to have this "leap of faith", you need to
        change the perspective from "how you can instill the belief" to "what
        do the developers need for the commitment". I believe "faith" is
        merely "belief in the ability to meet the goal." Commitment and faith
        are interchangeable in this case. You can help in that realization,
        though.

        I believe that the only way to create commitment is to create an
        environment where people can self-motivate themselves. One training I
        was involved in trained it something like this:

        Motivation is an internal state for a desire to achieve something. The
        key elements of potentially becoming committed are -
        - Perception of the goal and its importance to something the person
        values (in this case, the company).
        - Perception of the meaning of this goal to oneself (what's in it for
        the developers, internal motives).
        - A feasible, observed path to the goal
        - Belief in one's ability to achieve the goal

        Based on your comments, I believe the first point should be about
        clear for all involved people. It may be that the rest are still up in
        the air.

        So what can you do to address the last three?

        It could be that the project would mean loads of overtime (or at least
        people could be afraid of that) or it would mean changes to summer
        plans. Does it? If it does, what are the personal gains to balance the
        "cost"? Can the project run late and the people will then be working
        two extra months really hard "because it should've been ready already"?

        Does the project advance the interests of the developers in some other
        way?

        Do the developers perceive that the goal is achievable? Is it? Really,
        I mean. Or is it "I think we can do it". If it is impossible to feel
        confident about that now, what can we do in short term to increase our
        perception of the solution and its feasibility? You said that the
        competence should be there, but you have to help the team see it in
        relation to the way to the target.

        Your description of the project sounds like a risky business. There
        are big unknowns. Can you eliminate them? What can you do to reduce
        the uncertainty or impact? I don't think it's a wonder your developers
        (who, in the end, will have to build it or face the consequences) feel
        hesitant.

        One thing I see possible to try is to discuss and set a mid-term goal
        to which the team _can_ commit to. For example, "can we have this and
        that figured out in two weeks?" If "this and that" is one of the core
        risks, solving it in two weeks will help them see how they can achieve
        the ultimate goal. This will allow the people to postpone the final
        commitment and give them something to reach that does meet the
        criteria I suggested above. I think this is one of the things that
        make Scrum so powerful in general - perceptible, achievable goals.

        As to monetary incentives, they tend to make people work harder, not
        smarter. Try to find ones that instill desire to do smart things. I
        believe they will yield much better end result. This is not McDonalds
        where only the quantity really counts.

        Hope this helps, and good luck for the whole team!


        Yours, Petri


        Petri Heiramo
        Senior Process Improvement Manager, CSP
        Digia Plc., Finland

        --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "David H." <dmalloc@...> wrote:
        >
        > Dear practitioners.
        >
        > I am in a somewhat awkward position. While the company I am working
        > for is very successful and recently has one a rather awesome new
        > customer, capable of literally transforming the future of said
        > company, I am still left with an environment which seems to be unsure
        > of itself. Without going into to much detail I will explain the
        > situation in its utter simplicity.
        >
        > a) New customer, trusts us, very happy to work with us, but an utterly
        > tight deadline end of August. Customer has an existing (very simple)
        > web-site which needs to be "cloned" on our platform.
        > b) Customer is willing to negotiate on what can be done, they much
        > rather have "a business" at the end of August than not having any
        > business at all.
        > c) The middle ware platform we would ideally like to port this to is
        > not fully there yet, however many think it is achievable.
        >
        > There have been many discussions around risk reduction, a plan B is in
        > effect and there is no reason to believe whatsoever that the people
        > needing to deliver this were not involved. The teams have been
        > repeatedly asked about scope, they esitimated, they raised concerned
        > etc etc.
        >
        > I strongly believe that everything has been done to consult the people
        > that need to commit to the work and I believe that the business side
        > of things has always said "tell us what is doable and we will
        > negotiate with them".
        >
        > However to me this is a matter of belief now. This is more about
        > conviction that we can achieve this and it is something that is not
        > quantifiable. When General Meng Tian was tasked to build a wall "8
        > foot high and 3000 miles long" around China he must have somehow
        > developed that faith and made some of his helpers see, when President
        > Kennedy asked to put a man on the moon within 7 years, some NASA
        > engineers must have developed that faith.
        >
        > While I know a lot about human psychology and the motivational tools
        > we can utilise to make those around us feel at ease with a task at
        > hand, I know little about faith. I do not believe in a God, I do not
        > have ea religion, most of the things I believe in are driven by cold
        > hard facts. However, in this very case, to rise above and beyond
        > themselves I believe the people on the floor need to have "faith". My
        > question is a simple one. How can I help foster an environment which
        > allows room for believing and taking the risk to believe.
        >
        > Thank you
        >
        > -d
        >
        >
        > --
        > Sent from gmail so do not trust this communication.
        > Do not send me sensitive information here, ask for my none-gmail
        accounts.
        >
        > "Therefore the considerations of the intelligent always include both
        > benefit and harm." - Sun Tzu
        >
      • Mike Sutton
        Hey David, this is a really excellent and well constructed question. If I understand correctly this is about motivating the team into BELIEVING they can
        Message 3 of 7 , Jun 3, 2008
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          Hey David,

          this is a really excellent and well constructed question. If I
          understand correctly this is about motivating the team into BELIEVING
          they can deliver rather than any choice of middleware etc.


          My approach to this would be...

          I would NEED to have belief myself that this project (as defined by
          your scope) can be delivered by August. To do this I would....

          Consider the task at hand - deliver as much value to your customer by
          the August deadline - you're lucky, you have a customer that has
          gotten beyond the ridiculous 'I want it all by August!'- as an
          outcome, a goal.

          Apply some reasonable tests to this outcome - here are some I might pick:
          Is it focused enough?(I want only logged in users to access page a,b,c
          versus the site must be secure)

          Does achieving the outcome depend mostly on me and my team or are
          there external actors who we have no influence over?

          Do I/we/the team (US!) have the skills, technology, resources to
          achieve the outcome?

          Finally, some kind of ecology test - would achieving this outcome -
          delivering value for this great customer - be GOOD. Would it make you
          personally happy and satisfied, what would it do for the team, your
          company etc.

          Once I was convinced that the outcome passed all my tests, I would get
          me and the team to do this iteratively until the outcome passed ALL
          the tests.

          In doing this, use as much vivid positive descriptions of what you
          would feel like, see, hear when you delivered this outcome (it might
          be imagine on 25th August when the last CI build shows success , all
          the tests have run and the screen is pure green).

          Walk your team through this, help them to VISUALISE success. Encourage
          your customer to be vocal about how great their business will be by
          your team helping them.

          In the end, people are truely motivated by belief. But sometimes
          belief can lead the unpragmatic into over estimating their abilities
          in the face of real constraints (August!). As a coach/Scrum
          master/guide, its part of your duty to help shape the belief around
          reasonable achievable goals.

          I suspect the General who built the great wall didn't have to sell it
          to his team as much as threaten them sufficiently but he still needed
          to believe he could deliver (otherwise, he might be on the receiving
          end of the threats!).

          As always, I would be happy to help you offlist.

          mike
          csm.csp.cspo.certified.certifiable.



          --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "David H." <dmalloc@...> wrote:
          >
          > Dear practitioners.
          >
          > I am in a somewhat awkward position. While the company I am working
          > for is very successful and recently has one a rather awesome new
          > customer, capable of literally transforming the future of said
          > company, I am still left with an environment which seems to be unsure
          > of itself. Without going into to much detail I will explain the
          > situation in its utter simplicity.
          >
          > a) New customer, trusts us, very happy to work with us, but an utterly
          > tight deadline end of August. Customer has an existing (very simple)
          > web-site which needs to be "cloned" on our platform.
          > b) Customer is willing to negotiate on what can be done, they much
          > rather have "a business" at the end of August than not having any
          > business at all.
          > c) The middle ware platform we would ideally like to port this to is
          > not fully there yet, however many think it is achievable.
          >
          > There have been many discussions around risk reduction, a plan B is in
          > effect and there is no reason to believe whatsoever that the people
          > needing to deliver this were not involved. The teams have been
          > repeatedly asked about scope, they esitimated, they raised concerned
          > etc etc.
          >
          > I strongly believe that everything has been done to consult the people
          > that need to commit to the work and I believe that the business side
          > of things has always said "tell us what is doable and we will
          > negotiate with them".
          >
          > However to me this is a matter of belief now. This is more about
          > conviction that we can achieve this and it is something that is not
          > quantifiable. When General Meng Tian was tasked to build a wall "8
          > foot high and 3000 miles long" around China he must have somehow
          > developed that faith and made some of his helpers see, when President
          > Kennedy asked to put a man on the moon within 7 years, some NASA
          > engineers must have developed that faith.
          >
          > While I know a lot about human psychology and the motivational tools
          > we can utilise to make those around us feel at ease with a task at
          > hand, I know little about faith. I do not believe in a God, I do not
          > have ea religion, most of the things I believe in are driven by cold
          > hard facts. However, in this very case, to rise above and beyond
          > themselves I believe the people on the floor need to have "faith". My
          > question is a simple one. How can I help foster an environment which
          > allows room for believing and taking the risk to believe.
          >
          > Thank you
          >
          > -d
          >
          >
          > --
          > Sent from gmail so do not trust this communication.
          > Do not send me sensitive information here, ask for my none-gmail
          accounts.
          >
          > "Therefore the considerations of the intelligent always include both
          > benefit and harm." - Sun Tzu
          >
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