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Scrum is Knowledge Creation

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  • Mike Beedle
    [I posted something similar elsewhere but perhaps this is of interest to this group as well?] Knowledge Management, Knowledge Creation, Rules of Knowledge,
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 8, 2004
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      [I posted something similar elsewhere but perhaps this
      is of interest to this group as well?]

      Knowledge Management, Knowledge Creation,
      Rules of Knowledge, etc; are very central to
      the "agile" heart and philosophy, and are an
      essential ingredient of Scrum.

      Scrum, one of the first agile processes, was originally
      based on lessons learned on "New Product" development,
      which by necessity includes "knowledge creation" and/or
      "collaborative learning":

      [NonakaTakeuchi] Hirotaka Takeuchi and Ikujiro Nonaka,
      The New New Product Development Game, Harvard Business Review
      (January 1986), pp. 137-146, 1986.

      (It is eerie to read this paper because it reads
      as if an Agile Software Development guru had written
      it .... only back in 1986!!!)

      Also, its authors help to start the Knowledge Management
      revolution in the 90s:

      [NonakeTakeuchi95] Nonaka I., Takeuchi H.,
      The Knowledge Creating Company,Oxford University Press,
      Oxford 1995.

      This "knowledge creation" influence is carried on
      through the Scrum tradition these days and it is
      certainly reflective of its "sharing knowledge and
      experience" values.

      Very literally, Knowledge Management/Creation
      principles, rules, patterns, processes are equivalent
      with the viewpoint of "Agile" and resonant
      if not equivalent with "Scrum".

      A better word to express to what is known as "Agile"
      could have easily been "Adaptable", "Learning-catalyzing",
      "Knowledge-Creating" or "Fast Feedback-oriented".

      The "agile" word was chosen in fact because it was thought
      to be a good "sales" word among upper management i.e.
      managers could associate with it as something cool
      but without any failure or strong special connotations.
      So "Agile" was chosen based on the short-lived "Business Agility"
      wave circa (95-97), that "never failed".. perhaps because
      the Internet wave took over, or perhaps because its lack
      of overall specificity? Either way "Agile" was a cool word
      with management and not associated with failure, high risk,
      or high expenses, like BPR, TQM, Knowledge Management,
      Future Creating Company, or Learning Organization.)

      In fact, at its core, the Agile Manifesto:
      http://www.agilemanifesto.org
      statements expressed the preference of a common meta-pattern --
      "Learning as a Team by quick Feedback", (over other more
      static choices, tools, documentation, contracts, plans, etc.):

      Individuals and interactions over processes and tools
      ==> Learning from feedback (team participants
      telling you things!)
      Working software over comprehensive documentation
      ==> Learning from feedback (the executable
      talking back to you!)
      Customer collaboration over contract negotiation
      ==> Learning from feedback (the customer
      talking back to you!)
      Responding to change over following a plan
      ==> Learning from feedback (Listening and
      making adjustments!)

      [The above is an excerpt of the upcoming publication:
      "Balanced Agility with Scrum: The Easy and Minimal Road
      to Agile Software Development", now 53 pages and
      growing rapidly! Drafts will soon be available for review.]


      - Mike

      http://www.mikebeedle.com

      "Live as if you were to die tomorrow.
      Learn as if you were to live forever.

      -- Gandhi
    • Boris Gloger
      Hi Mike, I like this - in my dissertation about Software Quality Management and Agile Software Development, I work currently exactly in this direction. Part 1
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 11, 2004
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        Hi Mike,

        I like this - in my dissertation about Software Quality Management and
        Agile Software Development, I work currently exactly in this direction.

        Part 1
        First I try to define: What is knowledge - The result of learning in
        context. (H. Willke)
        Then I try like to define what a Knowledge Organisation is: A Learning
        Organisation, where the smallest Learning Unit is a team: (P. Senge)
        After this I would like to describe software development as a learning
        social activity.

        Part 2
        Now I show that traditional software development approaches do NOT
        facilitate learning processes.
        Part 3
        Will show that agile development processes are built to emphasis
        learning, means generation of knowledge

        And Part 4 will show that this is a shift in the way software
        developers work not only because software developers want to work this
        way but because the economy forces us to find new ways of working, new
        ways to get the knowledge out of the brain.

        So I would love to read your new book.

        --- Boris

        On 9. Mär 2004, at 7:52, Mike Beedle wrote:

        >
        > [I posted something similar elsewhere but perhaps this
        > is of interest to this group as well?]
        >
        > Knowledge Management, Knowledge Creation,
        > Rules of Knowledge, etc; are very central to
        > the "agile" heart and philosophy, and are an
        > essential ingredient of Scrum.
        >
        > Scrum, one of the first agile processes, was originally
        > based on lessons learned on "New Product" development,
        > which by necessity includes "knowledge creation" and/or
        > "collaborative learning":
        >
        > [NonakaTakeuchi] Hirotaka Takeuchi and Ikujiro Nonaka,
        > The New New Product Development Game, Harvard Business Review
        > (January 1986), pp. 137-146, 1986.
        >
        > (It is eerie to read this paper because it reads
        > as if an Agile Software Development guru had written
        > it .... only back in 1986!!!)
        >
        > Also, its authors help to start the Knowledge Management
        > revolution in the 90s:
        >
        > [NonakeTakeuchi95] Nonaka I., Takeuchi H.,
        > The Knowledge Creating Company,Oxford University Press,
        > Oxford 1995.
        >
        > This "knowledge creation" influence is carried on
        > through the Scrum tradition these days and it is
        > certainly reflective of its "sharing knowledge and
        > experience" values.
        >
        > Very literally, Knowledge Management/Creation
        > principles, rules, patterns, processes are equivalent
        > with the viewpoint of "Agile" and resonant
        > if not equivalent with "Scrum".
        >
        > A better word to express to what is known as "Agile"
        > could have easily been "Adaptable", "Learning-catalyzing",
        > "Knowledge-Creating" or "Fast Feedback-oriented".
        >
        > The "agile" word was chosen in fact because it was thought
        > to be a good "sales" word among upper management i.e.
        > managers could associate with it as something cool
        > but without any failure or strong special connotations.
        > So "Agile" was chosen based on the short-lived "Business Agility"
        > wave circa (95-97), that "never failed".. perhaps because
        > the Internet wave took over, or perhaps because its lack
        > of overall specificity? Either way "Agile" was a cool word
        > with management and not associated with failure, high risk,
        > or high expenses, like BPR, TQM, Knowledge Management,
        > Future Creating Company, or Learning Organization.)
        >
        > In fact, at its core, the Agile Manifesto:
        > http://www.agilemanifesto.org
        > statements expressed the preference of a common meta-pattern --
        > "Learning as a Team by quick Feedback", (over other more
        > static choices, tools, documentation, contracts, plans, etc.):
        >
        > Individuals and interactions over processes and tools
        > ==> Learning from feedback (team participants
        > telling you things!)
        > Working software over comprehensive documentation
        > ==> Learning from feedback (the executable
        > talking back to you!)
        > Customer collaboration over contract negotiation
        > ==> Learning from feedback (the customer
        > talking back to you!)
        > Responding to change over following a plan
        > ==> Learning from feedback (Listening and
        > making adjustments!)
        >
        > [The above is an excerpt of the upcoming publication:
        > "Balanced Agility with Scrum: The Easy and Minimal Road
        > to Agile Software Development", now 53 pages and
        > growing rapidly! Drafts will soon be available for review.]
        >
        >
        > - Mike
        >
        > http://www.mikebeedle.com
        >
        > "Live as if you were to die tomorrow.
        > Learn as if you were to live forever.
        >
        > -- Gandhi
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > To Post a message, send it to: scrumdevelopment@...
        > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
        > scrumdevelopment-unsubscribe@...
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Steven Gordon
        Boris, See Phil Armour s The Laws of Software Process: A New Model for the Production and Management of Software
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 11, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          Boris,

          See Phil Armour's The Laws of Software Process: A New Model for the Production and Management of Software (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0849314895/p11-20/ref%3Dnosim/104-5516371-0792761) for a presentation of an idea that is quite similar to your dissertation.

          Steven Gordon
          http://sf.asu.edu/


          -----Original Message-----
          From: Boris Gloger [mailto:boris@...]
          Sent: Thu 3/11/2004 5:45 AM
          To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
          Cc:
          Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Scrum is Knowledge Creation


          Hi Mike,

          I like this - in my dissertation about Software Quality Management and
          Agile Software Development, I work currently exactly in this direction.

          Part 1
          First I try to define: What is knowledge - The result of learning in
          context. (H. Willke)
          Then I try like to define what a Knowledge Organisation is: A Learning
          Organisation, where the smallest Learning Unit is a team: (P. Senge)
          After this I would like to describe software development as a learning
          social activity.

          Part 2
          Now I show that traditional software development approaches do NOT
          facilitate learning processes.
          Part 3
          Will show that agile development processes are built to emphasis
          learning, means generation of knowledge

          And Part 4 will show that this is a shift in the way software
          developers work not only because software developers want to work this
          way but because the economy forces us to find new ways of working, new
          ways to get the knowledge out of the brain.

          So I would love to read your new book.

          --- Boris

          On 9. Mär 2004, at 7:52, Mike Beedle wrote:

          >
          > [I posted something similar elsewhere but perhaps this
          > is of interest to this group as well?]
          >
          > Knowledge Management, Knowledge Creation,
          > Rules of Knowledge, etc; are very central to
          > the "agile" heart and philosophy, and are an
          > essential ingredient of Scrum.
          >
          > Scrum, one of the first agile processes, was originally
          > based on lessons learned on "New Product" development,
          > which by necessity includes "knowledge creation" and/or
          > "collaborative learning":
          >
          > [NonakaTakeuchi] Hirotaka Takeuchi and Ikujiro Nonaka,
          > The New New Product Development Game, Harvard Business Review
          > (January 1986), pp. 137-146, 1986.
          >
          > (It is eerie to read this paper because it reads
          > as if an Agile Software Development guru had written
          > it .... only back in 1986!!!)
          >
          > Also, its authors help to start the Knowledge Management
          > revolution in the 90s:
          >
          > [NonakeTakeuchi95] Nonaka I., Takeuchi H.,
          > The Knowledge Creating Company,Oxford University Press,
          > Oxford 1995.
          >
          > This "knowledge creation" influence is carried on
          > through the Scrum tradition these days and it is
          > certainly reflective of its "sharing knowledge and
          > experience" values.
          >
          > Very literally, Knowledge Management/Creation
          > principles, rules, patterns, processes are equivalent
          > with the viewpoint of "Agile" and resonant
          > if not equivalent with "Scrum".
          >
          > A better word to express to what is known as "Agile"
          > could have easily been "Adaptable", "Learning-catalyzing",
          > "Knowledge-Creating" or "Fast Feedback-oriented".
          >
          > The "agile" word was chosen in fact because it was thought
          > to be a good "sales" word among upper management i.e.
          > managers could associate with it as something cool
          > but without any failure or strong special connotations.
          > So "Agile" was chosen based on the short-lived "Business Agility"
          > wave circa (95-97), that "never failed".. perhaps because
          > the Internet wave took over, or perhaps because its lack
          > of overall specificity? Either way "Agile" was a cool word
          > with management and not associated with failure, high risk,
          > or high expenses, like BPR, TQM, Knowledge Management,
          > Future Creating Company, or Learning Organization.)
          >
          > In fact, at its core, the Agile Manifesto:
          > http://www.agilemanifesto.org
          > statements expressed the preference of a common meta-pattern --
          > "Learning as a Team by quick Feedback", (over other more
          > static choices, tools, documentation, contracts, plans, etc.):
          >
          > Individuals and interactions over processes and tools
          > ==> Learning from feedback (team participants
          > telling you things!)
          > Working software over comprehensive documentation
          > ==> Learning from feedback (the executable
          > talking back to you!)
          > Customer collaboration over contract negotiation
          > ==> Learning from feedback (the customer
          > talking back to you!)
          > Responding to change over following a plan
          > ==> Learning from feedback (Listening and
          > making adjustments!)
          >
          > [The above is an excerpt of the upcoming publication:
          > "Balanced Agility with Scrum: The Easy and Minimal Road
          > to Agile Software Development", now 53 pages and
          > growing rapidly! Drafts will soon be available for review.]
          >
          >
          > - Mike
          >
          > http://www.mikebeedle.com
          >
          > "Live as if you were to die tomorrow.
          > Learn as if you were to live forever.
          >
          > -- Gandhi
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > To Post a message, send it to: scrumdevelopment@...
          > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
          > scrumdevelopment-unsubscribe@...
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >



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        • Brad Appleton
          ... Also see Phil s column The Business of Software which appears regularly in CACM. Some exceprts of his early columns are near the bottom of the page at:
          Message 4 of 6 , Mar 11, 2004
          • 0 Attachment
            On Thu, Mar 11, 2004 at 06:39:51AM -0700, Steven Gordon wrote:
            > Boris,
            >
            > See Phil Armour's The Laws of Software Process: A New Model for the Production and Management of Software (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0849314895/p11-20/ref%3Dnosim/104-5516371-0792761) for a presentation of an idea that is quite similar to your dissertation.


            Also see Phil's column "The Business of Software" which appears
            regularly in CACM. Some exceprts of his early columns are near
            the bottom of the page at:
            http://www.corvusintl.com/whats.htm

            Also see slides from a talk he gave in Chicago to the ChAD
            group at:
            http://wiki.cs.uiuc.edu/CHAD/21+November+03+Meeting


            --
            Brad Appleton <brad@...> www.bradapp.net
            Software CM Patterns (www.scmpatterns.com)
            Effective Teamwork, Practical Integration
            "And miles to go before I sleep." -- Robert Frost
          • Mike Beedle
            All, Phil s work is good. I enjoyed his presentation when he presented at CHAD (Chicago Agile Developers). However, much more can be done and said. I see 3 or
            Message 5 of 6 , Mar 11, 2004
            • 0 Attachment
              Message
               
              All,
               
              Phil's work is good.  I enjoyed his presentation when he presented at CHAD
              (Chicago Agile Developers).
               
              However, much more can be done and said.
               
              I see 3 or 4 interesting sources that are somewhat disconnected.  (Perhaps,
              Boris's dissertation will help to establish a link?):
               
                  * Patterns (Alexandrian or otherwise)
                  * Scrum
                  * Learning Organizations
                  * Knowledge Management (Management thread)
                  * Knowledge Representation (AI)
                  * Phil's work (there are some unique things
                  * Old style AI/OO techniques like "semantic networks"
                  * Object Calculi
                  * Graph Theory applied to software
                  * Logical languages and OO Logical languages
                  * Semantic Web
                  * Anthropology
                  * etc.  ... probably missing a few
               
              - Mike

              http://www.mikebeedle.com

                "I am always doing things I can't do, that's how I get to do them."

                      --Pablo Picasso



              -----Original Message-----
              From: Brad Appleton [mailto:brad@...]
              Sent: Thursday, March 11, 2004 10:35 AM
              To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Scrum is Knowledge Creation

              On Thu, Mar 11, 2004 at 06:39:51AM -0700, Steven Gordon wrote:
              > Boris,

              > See Phil Armour's The Laws of Software Process: A New Model for the Production and Management of Software (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0849314895/p11-20/ref%3Dnosim/104-5516371-0792761) for a presentation of an idea that is quite similar to your dissertation.


              Also see Phil's column "The Business of Software" which appears
              regularly in CACM. Some exceprts of his early columns are near
              the bottom of the page at:
                 http://www.corvusintl.com/whats.htm

              Also see slides from a talk he gave in Chicago to the ChAD
              group at:
                 http://wiki.cs.uiuc.edu/CHAD/21+November+03+Meeting


              --
              Brad Appleton <brad@...> www.bradapp.net
                Software CM Patterns (www.scmpatterns.com)
                 Effective Teamwork, Practical Integration
              "And miles to go before I sleep." -- Robert Frost


              To Post a message, send it to:   scrumdevelopment@...
              To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: scrumdevelopment-unsubscribe@...


            • Steven Gordon
              Certainly the amount of applicable knowledge about knowledge and its creation is huge. Phil s works was particularly similar to the premise expressed by Boris.
              Message 6 of 6 , Mar 11, 2004
              • 0 Attachment
                Certainly the amount of applicable knowledge about knowledge and its creation is huge.

                Phil's works was particularly similar to the premise expressed by Boris. It was so close that the originality of the dissertation could be at risk if steps were not taken to acknowledge the similarity and distinguish the value-add.

                -----Original Message-----
                From: Mike Beedle [mailto:beedlem@...]
                Sent: Thu 3/11/2004 1:08 PM
                To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                Cc:
                Subject: RE: [scrumdevelopment] Scrum is Knowledge Creation


                All,

                Phil's work is good. I enjoyed his presentation when he presented at
                CHAD
                (Chicago Agile Developers).

                However, much more can be done and said.

                I see 3 or 4 interesting sources that are somewhat disconnected.
                (Perhaps,
                Boris's dissertation will help to establish a link?):

                * Patterns (Alexandrian or otherwise)
                * Scrum
                * Learning Organizations
                * Knowledge Management (Management thread)
                * Knowledge Representation (AI)
                * Phil's work (there are some unique things
                * Old style AI/OO techniques like "semantic networks"
                * Object Calculi
                * Graph Theory applied to software
                * Logical languages and OO Logical languages
                * Semantic Web
                * Anthropology
                * etc. ... probably missing a few

                - Mike

                h <http://www.mikebeedle.com> ttp://www.mikebeedle.com

                "I am always doing things I can't do, that's how I get to do them."

                --Pablo Picasso





                -----Original Message-----
                From: Brad Appleton [mailto:brad@...]
                Sent: Thursday, March 11, 2004 10:35 AM
                To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Scrum is Knowledge Creation


                On Thu, Mar 11, 2004 at 06:39:51AM -0700, Steven Gordon wrote:
                > Boris,
                >
                > See Phil Armour's The Laws of Software Process: A New Model for the
                Production and Management of Software
                (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0849314895/p11-20/ref%3Dnosim/10
                4-5516371-0792761) for a presentation of an idea that is quite similar
                to your dissertation.


                Also see Phil's column "The Business of Software" which appears
                regularly in CACM. Some exceprts of his early columns are near
                the bottom of the page at:
                http://www.corvusintl.com/whats.htm

                Also see slides from a talk he gave in Chicago to the ChAD
                group at:
                http://wiki.cs.uiuc.edu/CHAD/21+November+03+Meeting


                --
                Brad Appleton <brad@...> www.bradapp.net
                Software CM Patterns (www.scmpatterns.com)
                Effective Teamwork, Practical Integration
                "And miles to go before I sleep." -- Robert Frost
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