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Re: Freeware/open source SCRUM tool

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  • poojawandile
    I am looking for a tool to manage spint backlog, product backlog, issues, risks, burndown chart, etc. Though this can be acheived through an excel also, I just
    Message 1 of 25 , Mar 3, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      I am looking for a tool to manage spint backlog, product backlog,
      issues, risks, burndown chart, etc. Though this can be acheived
      through an excel also, I just thought a tool may offer some more
      features which may not be exactly and easily possible through an
      excel spreadsheet, for delegating activities to team emmebers and
      allowing them to update their tasks on their own. With my limited
      knowledge on Scrum, yes, I would be interested in knowing the pros
      and cons of using a tool against an excel sheet or the need of a
      tool itself.

      Thanks,
      Pooja


      --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Pete Deemer
      <petedeemer@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi Pooja, I get this quite often. My first question is always:
      What are
      > the problems you're having that you'd like the tool to solve?
      >
      >
      > -------------------------------------
      > Pete Deemer
      > GoodAgile
      > CSM in Delhi (Gurgaon), March 5-6 - seats still available - full
      details
      > at goodagile.com
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > poojawandile wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > Hi,
      > > Could you please suggest any freeware SCRUM tool?
      > >
      > > Thanks,
      > > Pooja
      > >
      > >
      >
    • Tobias Mayer
      Hi Pooja, As Xavier suggested you may be better off starting with no electronic tool at all, not even Excel. Start with a taskboard and some hand drawn
      Message 2 of 25 , Mar 3, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi Pooja,

        As Xavier suggested you may be better off starting with no electronic
        tool at all, not even Excel. Start with a taskboard and some hand drawn
        burndown charts. After a few sprints you will begin to determine what
        kind of tool support you need.

        Here is the major con: if you pick a tool before starting to sprint your
        process will be driven by the tool, not by your needs.

        I also advise you again to look at Pete Deemer's question. It is a very
        good one and should be given some thought. In your response you tell
        what the solution should be, but not what the problem actually is.

        Best wishes,
        Tobias

        --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "poojawandile"
        <poojawandile@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > I am looking for a tool to manage spint backlog, product backlog,
        > issues, risks, burndown chart, etc. Though this can be acheived
        > through an excel also, I just thought a tool may offer some more
        > features which may not be exactly and easily possible through an
        > excel spreadsheet, for delegating activities to team emmebers and
        > allowing them to update their tasks on their own. With my limited
        > knowledge on Scrum, yes, I would be interested in knowing the pros
        > and cons of using a tool against an excel sheet or the need of a
        > tool itself.
        >
        > Thanks,
        > Pooja
        >
        >
        > --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Pete Deemer
        > petedeemer@ wrote:
        > >
        > > Hi Pooja, I get this quite often. My first question is always:
        > What are
        > > the problems you're having that you'd like the tool to solve?
        > >
        > >
        > > -------------------------------------
        > > Pete Deemer
        > > GoodAgile
        > > CSM in Delhi (Gurgaon), March 5-6 - seats still available - full
        > details
        > > at goodagile.com
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > poojawandile wrote:
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Hi,
        > > > Could you please suggest any freeware SCRUM tool?
        > > >
        > > > Thanks,
        > > > Pooja
        > > >
        > > >
        > >
        >
      • Jaideep Khanduja
        Hello Pooja, As long as your team is centralized, and you are able to work well with simple excel sheets, there seems to be no need to go for any tools.
        Message 3 of 25 , Mar 3, 2008
        • 0 Attachment

          Hello Pooja,

           

          As long as your team is centralized, and you are able to work well with simple excel sheets, there seems to be no need to go for any tools.

           

          kind regards,

           

          Jaideep

          ___________________________________

          ** If we only do as well as we did yesterday, then we will not see any improvement tomorrow.

          ___________________________________

           

          P Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail


          From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of poojawandile
          Sent: 03 March, 2008 16:35
          To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Freeware/open source SCRUM tool

           


          I am looking for a tool to manage spint backlog, product backlog,
          issues, risks, burndown chart, etc. Though this can be acheived
          through an excel also, I just thought a tool may offer some more
          features which may not be exactly and easily possible through an
          excel spreadsheet, for delegating activities to team emmebers and
          allowing them to update their tasks on their own. With my limited
          knowledge on Scrum, yes, I would be interested in knowing the pros
          and cons of using a tool against an excel sheet or the need of a
          tool itself.

          Thanks,
          Pooja

          --- In scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com, Pete Deemer
          <petedeemer@ ...> wrote:

          >
          > Hi Pooja, I get this quite often. My first question is always:
          What are
          > the problems you're having that you'd like the tool to solve?
          >
          >
          > ------------ --------- --------- -------
          > Pete
          w:st="on">Deemer
          > GoodAgile
          > CSM in Delhi
          (Gurgaon), March 5-6 - seats still available - full
          details
          > at goodagile.com
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > poojawandile wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > > Hi,
          > > Could you please suggest any freeware SCRUM tool?
          > >
          > > Thanks,
          > > Pooja
          > >
          > >
          >

          Confidentiality Notice:

          The information contained in this electronic message and any attachments to this message are intended for the exclusive use of the addressee(s) and may contain confidential or privileged information. If you are not the intended recipient, please notify the sender at admin@... immediately and destroy all the copies of this message and any attachments

        • Pete Deemer
          let me share a story. I once knew a team that was doing scrum quite happily, using pencils and paper and post-it notes and not much else. but it felt very low
          Message 4 of 25 , Mar 3, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            let me share a story. I once knew a team that was doing scrum quite
            happily, using pencils and paper and post-it notes and not much else.
            but it felt very low tech and old-fashioned to them. as one of them put
            it: this is how my grand-dad used to do things back in his day! so they
            decided to come up with a better approach. they set up a database to
            store all the info that previously was living on paper, and they built a
            bunch of nice web pages for entering and viewing the data. with each
            week that passed, they added more and more features, to the point where
            the tool was getting quite complicated. unfortunately, they found
            themselves spending more and more fixing and extending the tool, which
            took time away from other things. but it was very powerful. instead of
            just one simple burndown chart for the whole team, they now could look
            at individual burndown charts for every member of the team, and they
            could see who was ahead and who was behind. and someone added a wiki
            page that allowed everyone to type in their daily update and blocks,
            which allowed the team to stop doing the daily scrum meeting in person.
            and someone else built a clever tool that automatically create a task
            queue for each team member, so that they always knew exactly what to
            work on; they didn't need to even think about it, the system just told
            them what to do. and management learned about the tool (the team showed
            it off during a sprint review), and asked for the team to create a
            single page for the exec team to look at, which showed the burndown
            chart for every single person in the department, and anyone who was
            behind on their tasks, or on their "delivered versus predicted task
            hours per day" (a new metric someone suggested they monitor, since the
            data was all there in the tool) would show up with a bright red blinking
            flag next to their name. The execs liked this dashboard so much they
            asked for a wap version of the page, so they could check it via their
            blackberry from the car, train, etc., a couple times a day if they
            wanted. Over the course of about two months, what had been a happy and
            productive team somehow evolved into a group of stressed out, unhappy
            individuals all constantly looking over their shoulder, and none of them
            had the faintest idea how they were doing during the sprint, which led
            to missed goals and even closer executive monitoring. Getting them back
            on track was very costly and painful, and it was doubly disappointing
            because the whole detour occurred for no good reason.

            I'm not saying that tools are wrong, by any means; for larger projects
            and multi-location teams, they can be helpful. But before going that
            route, I would get very clear on the problem you're trying to solve, and
            be certain that your tool is going to address the underlying issue, and
            not simply disguise it.

            -------------------------------------
            Pete Deemer
            GoodAgile
            CSM in Delhi (Gurgaon), March 5-6 - seats still available - full details
            at goodagile.com


            poojawandile wrote:
            >
            >
            > I am looking for a tool to manage spint backlog, product backlog,
            > issues, risks, burndown chart, etc. Though this can be acheived
            > through an excel also, I just thought a tool may offer some more
            > features which may not be exactly and easily possible through an
            > excel spreadsheet, for delegating activities to team emmebers and
            > allowing them to update their tasks on their own. With my limited
            > knowledge on Scrum, yes, I would be interested in knowing the pros
            > and cons of using a tool against an excel sheet or the need of a
            > tool itself.
            >
            > Thanks,
            > Pooja
            >
            > --- In scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com
            > <mailto:scrumdevelopment%40yahoogroups.com>, Pete Deemer
            > <petedeemer@ ...> wrote:
            > >
            > > Hi Pooja, I get this quite often. My first question is always:
            > What are
            > > the problems you're having that you'd like the tool to solve?
            > >
            > >
            > > ------------ --------- --------- -------
            > > Pete Deemer
            > > GoodAgile
            > > CSM in Delhi (Gurgaon), March 5-6 - seats still available - full
            > details
            > > at goodagile.com
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > poojawandile wrote:
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > Hi,
            > > > Could you please suggest any freeware SCRUM tool?
            > > >
            > > > Thanks,
            > > > Pooja
            > > >
            > > >
            > >
            >
            >
          • Mark Saffell
            This is great! Just remeber how was the first tool made? You need tools to make tools. Who invented whatever? Why did they invent whatever? Did they really
            Message 5 of 25 , Mar 3, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              This is great! Just remeber how was the first tool made? You need tools to make tools.
              Who invented whatever? Why did they invent whatever? Did they really invent it themself or did they see someone else try to invent it?
              Human nature?
              -Mark A Saffell

              Pete Deemer <petedeemer@...> wrote:

              let me share a story. I once knew a team that was doing scrum quite
              happily, using pencils and paper and post-it notes and not much else.
              but it felt very low tech and old-fashioned to them. as one of them put
              it: this is how my grand-dad used to do things back in his day! so they
              decided to come up with a better approach. they set up a database to
              store all the info that previously was living on paper, and they built a
              bunch of nice web pages for entering and viewing the data. with each
              week that passed, they added more and more features, to the point where
              the tool was getting quite complicated. unfortunately, they found
              themselves spending more and more fixing and extending the tool, which
              took time away from other things. but it was very powerful. instead of
              just one simple burndown chart for the whole team, they now could look
              at individual burndown charts for every member of the team, and they
              could see who was ahead and who was behind. and someone added a wiki
              page that allowed everyone to type in their daily update and blocks,
              which allowed the team to stop doing the daily scrum meeting in person.
              and someone else built a clever tool that automatically create a task
              queue for each team member, so that they always knew exactly what to
              work on; they didn't need to even think about it, the system just told
              them what to do. and management learned about the tool (the team showed
              it off during a sprint review), and asked for the team to create a
              single page for the exec team to look at, which showed the burndown
              chart for every single person in the department, and anyone who was
              behind on their tasks, or on their "delivered versus predicted task
              hours per day" (a new metric someone suggested they monitor, since the
              data was all there in the tool) would show up with a bright red blinking
              flag next to their name. The execs liked this dashboard so much they
              asked for a wap version of the page, so they could check it via their
              blackberry from the car, train, etc., a couple times a day if they
              wanted. Over the course of about two months, what had been a happy and
              productive team somehow evolved into a group of stressed out, unhappy
              individuals all constantly looking over their shoulder, and none of them
              had the faintest idea how they were doing during the sprint, which led
              to missed goals and even closer executive monitoring. Getting them back
              on track was very costly and painful, and it was doubly disappointing
              because the whole detour occurred for no good reason.

              I'm not saying that tools are wrong, by any means; for larger projects
              and multi-location teams, they can be helpful. But before going that
              route, I would get very clear on the problem you're trying to solve, and
              be certain that your tool is going to address the underlying issue, and
              not simply disguise it.

              ------------ --------- --------- -------
              Pete Deemer
              GoodAgile
              CSM in Delhi (Gurgaon), March 5-6 - seats still available - full details
              at goodagile.com

              poojawandile wrote:
              >
              >
              > I am looking for a tool to manage spint backlog, product backlog,
              > issues, risks, burndown chart, etc. Though this can be acheived
              > through an excel also, I just thought a tool may offer some more
              > features which may not be exactly and easily possible through an
              > excel spreadsheet, for delegating activities to team emmebers and
              > allowing them to update their tasks on their own. With my limited
              > knowledge on Scrum, yes, I would be interested in knowing the pros
              > and cons of using a tool against an excel sheet or the need of a
              > tool itself.
              >
              > Thanks,
              > Pooja
              >
              > --- In scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com
              > <mailto:scrumdevelo pment%40yahoogro ups.com>, Pete Deemer
              > <petedeemer@ ...> wrote:
              > >
              > > Hi Pooja, I get this quite often. My first question is always:
              > What are
              > > the problems you're having that you'd like the tool to solve?
              > >
              > >
              > > ------------ --------- --------- -------
              > > Pete Deemer
              > > GoodAgile
              > > CSM in Delhi (Gurgaon), March 5-6 - seats still available - full
              > details
              > > at goodagile.com
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > poojawandile wrote:
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > Hi,
              > > > Could you please suggest any freeware SCRUM tool?
              > > >
              > > > Thanks,
              > > > Pooja
              > > >
              > > >
              > >
              >
              >



              Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage.

            • Michael James
              ... Have you ever seen a whole team assume collective ownership and control of an Excel spreadsheet? --mj (FULL DISCLOSURE: I sell ScrumWorks. BTW ScrumWorks
              Message 6 of 25 , Mar 3, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "Jaideep Khanduja" <jaideep.khanduja@...>
                wrote:

                > As long as your team is centralized, and you are able to work well with
                > simple excel sheets, there seems to be no need to go for any tools.

                Have you ever seen a whole team assume collective ownership
                and control of an Excel spreadsheet?

                --mj (FULL DISCLOSURE: I sell ScrumWorks. BTW ScrumWorks Basic is still free.)
              • Xavier Quesada Allue
                ... The excel sheet that is used in non-tool-based implementations of Scrum is only for the Product Backlog. We also use it to generate the project burndown
                Message 7 of 25 , Mar 3, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  > Have you ever seen a whole team assume collective ownership
                  > and control of an Excel spreadsheet?

                  The excel sheet that is used in non-tool-based implementations of
                  Scrum is only for the Product Backlog. We also use it to generate the
                  project burndown chart. That is all.

                  In my experience, only the Product Owner should have write access to
                  the product backlog. The Product Owner acts as SPOC for all
                  stakeholders (who are NOT the team members by the way). When new
                  stories are created, the PO adds them to the backlog with the correct
                  priority. No team member needs to touch the backlog except in
                  read-only mode.

                  In practice, the backlog is kept in Subversion so if anybody would
                  need to edit it for any reason, it is easy to track, merge and revert
                  changes. This simple approach is effective and the benefits garnered
                  from a fully featured Scrumboard are difficult if not impossible to
                  match for any tool.

                  http://www.agilar.org/blog/lean-scrumboard-gallery/

                  Tools still remain the best choice for distributed teams and I think
                  tool vendors should focus on this niche.

                  regards,
                  Xavier
                • Ken Schwaber
                  Excellent, Pete. Another problem I run into is that enterprises using a Scrum tool mistake that for doing Scrum. Ken _____ From:
                  Message 8 of 25 , Mar 3, 2008
                  • 0 Attachment

                    Excellent, Pete. Another problem I run into is that enterprises using a Scrum tool mistake that for doing Scrum.

                    Ken

                     


                    From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Pete Deemer
                    Sent: Monday, March 03, 2008 7:23 AM
                    To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Freeware/open source SCRUM tool

                     


                    let me share a story. I once knew a team that was doing scrum quite
                    happily, using pencils and paper and post-it notes and not much else.
                    but it felt very low tech and old-fashioned to them. as one of them put
                    it: this is how my grand-dad used to do things back in his day! so they
                    decided to come up with a better approach. they set up a database to
                    store all the info that previously was living on paper, and they built a
                    bunch of nice web pages for entering and viewing the data. with each
                    week that passed, they added more and more features, to the point where
                    the tool was getting quite complicated. unfortunately, they found
                    themselves spending more and more fixing and extending the tool, which
                    took time away from other things. but it was very powerful. instead of
                    just one simple burndown chart for the whole team, they now could look
                    at individual burndown charts for every member of the team, and they
                    could see who was ahead and who was behind. and someone added a wiki
                    page that allowed everyone to type in their daily update and blocks,
                    which allowed the team to stop doing the daily scrum meeting in person.
                    and someone else built a clever tool that automatically create a task
                    queue for each team member, so that they always knew exactly what to
                    work on; they didn't need to even think about it, the system just told
                    them what to do. and management learned about the tool (the team showed
                    it off during a sprint review), and asked for the team to create a
                    single page for the exec team to look at, which showed the burndown
                    chart for every single person in the department, and anyone who was
                    behind on their tasks, or on their "delivered versus predicted task
                    hours per day" (a new metric someone suggested they monitor, since the
                    data was all there in the tool) would show up with a bright red blinking
                    flag next to their name. The execs liked this dashboard so much they
                    asked for a wap version of the page, so they could check it via their
                    blackberry from the car, train, etc., a couple times a day if they
                    wanted. Over the course of about two months, what had been a happy and
                    productive team somehow evolved into a group of stressed out, unhappy
                    individuals all constantly looking over their shoulder, and none of them
                    had the faintest idea how they were doing during the sprint, which led
                    to missed goals and even closer executive monitoring. Getting them back
                    on track was very costly and painful, and it was doubly disappointing
                    because the whole detour occurred for no good reason.

                    I'm not saying that tools are wrong, by any means; for larger projects
                    and multi-location teams, they can be helpful. But before going that
                    route, I would get very clear on the problem you're trying to solve, and
                    be certain that your tool is going to address the underlying issue, and
                    not simply disguise it.

                    ------------ --------- --------- -------
                    Pete Deemer
                    GoodAgile
                    CSM in Delhi (Gurgaon), March 5-6 - seats still available - full details
                    at goodagile.com

                    poojawandile wrote:

                    >
                    >
                    > I am looking for a tool to manage spint backlog, product backlog,
                    > issues, risks, burndown chart, etc. Though this can be acheived
                    > through an excel also, I just thought a tool may offer some more
                    > features which may not be exactly and easily possible through an
                    > excel spreadsheet, for delegating activities to team emmebers and
                    > allowing them to update their tasks on their own. With my limited
                    > knowledge on Scrum, yes, I would be interested in knowing the pros
                    > and cons of using a tool against an excel sheet or the need of a
                    > tool itself.
                    >
                    > Thanks,
                    > Pooja
                    >
                    > --- In scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com
                    > <mailto:scrumdevelo pment%40yahoogro ups.com>, Pete Deemer
                    > <petedeemer@ ...> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Hi Pooja, I get this quite often. My first question is always:
                    > What are
                    > > the problems you're having that you'd like the tool to solve?
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > ------------ --------- --------- -------
                    > > Pete Deemer
                    > > GoodAgile
                    > > CSM in Delhi
                    (Gurgaon), March 5-6 - seats still available - full
                    > details
                    > > at goodagile.com
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > poojawandile wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > > Hi,
                    > > > Could you please suggest any freeware SCRUM tool?
                    > > >
                    > > > Thanks,
                    > > > Pooja
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > >
                    >
                    >

                  • Michelle Ammerman
                    In our office, I constantly ask our staff to be mindful of implementing cures for which there is no disease, because often, those cures cause new diseases.
                    Message 9 of 25 , Mar 3, 2008
                    • 0 Attachment

                      In our office, I constantly ask our staff to be mindful of implementing cures for which there is no disease, because often, those cures cause new diseases.  The scenario that Pete describes did just that.

                       

                      From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Ken Schwaber
                      Sent: Monday, March 03, 2008 3:39 PM
                      To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: RE: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Freeware/open source SCRUM tool

                       

                      Excellent, Pete. Another problem I run into is that enterprises using a Scrum tool mistake that for doing Scrum.

                      Ken

                       


                      From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Pete Deemer
                      Sent: Monday, March 03, 2008 7:23 AM
                      To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Freeware/open source SCRUM tool

                       


                      let me share a story. I once knew a team that was doing scrum quite
                      happily, using pencils and paper and post-it notes and not much else.
                      but it felt very low tech and old-fashioned to them. as one of them put
                      it: this is how my grand-dad used to do things back in his day! so they
                      decided to come up with a better approach. they set up a database to
                      store all the info that previously was living on paper, and they built a
                      bunch of nice web pages for entering and viewing the data. with each
                      week that passed, they added more and more features, to the point where
                      the tool was getting quite complicated. unfortunately, they found
                      themselves spending more and more fixing and extending the tool, which
                      took time away from other things. but it was very powerful. instead of
                      just one simple burndown chart for the whole team, they now could look
                      at individual burndown charts for every member of the team, and they
                      could see who was ahead and who was behind. and someone added a wiki
                      page that allowed everyone to type in their daily update and blocks,
                      which allowed the team to stop doing the daily scrum meeting in person.
                      and someone else built a clever tool that automatically create a task
                      queue for each team member, so that they always knew exactly what to
                      work on; they didn't need to even think about it, the system just told
                      them what to do. and management learned about the tool (the team showed
                      it off during a sprint review), and asked for the team to create a
                      single page for the exec team to look at, which showed the burndown
                      chart for every single person in the department, and anyone who was
                      behind on their tasks, or on their "delivered versus predicted task
                      hours per day" (a new metric someone suggested they monitor, since the
                      data was all there in the tool) would show up with a bright red blinking
                      flag next to their name. The execs liked this dashboard so much they
                      asked for a wap version of the page, so they could check it via their
                      blackberry from the car, train, etc., a couple times a day if they
                      wanted. Over the course of about two months, what had been a happy and
                      productive team somehow evolved into a group of stressed out, unhappy
                      individuals all constantly looking over their shoulder, and none of them
                      had the faintest idea how they were doing during the sprint, which led
                      to missed goals and even closer executive monitoring. Getting them back
                      on track was very costly and painful, and it was doubly disappointing
                      because the whole detour occurred for no good reason.

                      I'm not saying that tools are wrong, by any means; for larger projects
                      and multi-location teams, they can be helpful. But before going that
                      route, I would get very clear on the problem you're trying to solve, and
                      be certain that your tool is going to address the underlying issue, and
                      not simply disguise it.

                      -------------------------------------
                      Pete Deemer
                      GoodAgile
                      CSM in Delhi (Gurgaon), March 5-6 - seats still available - full details
                      at goodagile.com

                      poojawandile wrote:

                      >
                      >
                      > I am looking for a tool to manage spint backlog, product backlog,
                      > issues, risks, burndown chart, etc. Though this can be acheived
                      > through an excel also, I just thought a tool may offer some more
                      > features which may not be exactly and easily possible through an
                      > excel spreadsheet, for delegating activities to team emmebers and
                      > allowing them to update their tasks on their own. With my limited
                      > knowledge on Scrum, yes, I would be interested in knowing the pros
                      > and cons of using a tool against an excel sheet or the need of a
                      > tool itself.
                      >
                      > Thanks,
                      > Pooja
                      >
                      > --- In scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com
                      > <mailto:scrumdevelopment%40yahoogroups.com>, Pete Deemer
                      > <petedeemer@ ...> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Hi Pooja, I get this quite often. My first question is always:
                      > What are
                      > > the problems you're having that you'd like the tool to solve?
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > ------------ --------- --------- -------
                      > > Pete Deemer
                      > > GoodAgile
                      > > CSM in Delhi (Gurgaon), March 5-6 - seats still available - full
                      > details
                      > > at goodagile.com
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > poojawandile wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > Hi,
                      > > > Could you please suggest any freeware SCRUM tool?
                      > > >
                      > > > Thanks,
                      > > > Pooja
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > >
                      >
                      >

                    • andybrandt_dot_net
                      Hi All! On the side of Pooja s question I see a discussion on tools developing. I always see people arguing that physical, hand based solutions are much better
                      Message 10 of 25 , Mar 4, 2008
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Hi All!

                        On the side of Pooja's question I see a discussion on tools
                        developing. I always see people arguing that physical, hand based
                        solutions are much better than any tools that might be limiting etc.
                        Let me share my prospective on this.

                        First, I think this is more of a personality issue. There are people
                        who must have paper to make notes on, who feel bad without index cards
                        etc. I respect that, however, I'm a "paperless man". The only thing I
                        like on paper is books. I like whiteboards, but only as something
                        temporary for sketching some drawing and concepts, not for keeping and
                        maintaining anything. I don't feel my way of doing things is by any
                        means inherently worse. So I demand those who love paper and index
                        cards etc. do respect my virtual way of doing things as much as I do
                        respect theirs.

                        Second, the real problem here is getting too dogmatic about tools. As
                        long as you do realize the tool is no more than it is I don't think
                        you can go down the road someone else described at length. Yes, some
                        overdo by adding all kinds of "metrics" and turning Scrum into PMBOK.
                        Hence all the huge apps with hierarchies of backlog items, huge prices
                        and feature bloat.

                        But one can as well overdo with being too dogmatic about only index
                        cards and hand drawn burndowns being the "right way".

                        I think the right way is the way that works in a given situation, for
                        a given team.

                        And, thirdly, in today's world not everyone has the luxury of having
                        everyone at the same office, doing the same hours. And even if you do
                        have that - are your clients on-site? Can they physically walk in and
                        see the backlog, see the burndown? If not, then I'd argue using a good
                        - easy and simple - tool is much better than trying to do it with
                        Excel which is designed for other purposes.

                        The ideal to which we are trying to get is to give a dispersed team or
                        a remote client/product owner a virtual experience that has as much as
                        possible from the physical world meetings etc. whenever and wherever
                        that is not possible.

                        Best regards,
                        Andy Brandt

                        Code Sprinters
                        http://www.codesprinters.com/

                        --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "poojawandile"
                        <poojawandile@...> wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        > Hi,
                        > Could you please suggest any freeware SCRUM tool?
                        >
                        > Thanks,
                        > Pooja
                        >
                      • Jaideep Khanduja
                        From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Michael James Sent: 03 March, 2008 21:18 To:
                        Message 11 of 25 , Mar 4, 2008
                        • 0 Attachment

                          From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Michael James
                          Sent: 03 March, 2008 21:18
                          To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Freeware/open source SCRUM tool

                           

                          --- In scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com, " Jaideep Khanduja " <jaideep.khanduja@ ...>
                          wrote:

                          > As long as your team is centralized, and you are able to work well with
                          > simple excel sheets, there seems to be no need to go for any tools.

                          Have you ever seen a whole team assume collective ownership
                          and control of an Excel spreadsheet?

                          As far as ownership is concerned if it is there in a tool, it has to be there (and can very well be there) even if it is an excel spreadsheet. Tools by no chance create ownership, it comes from within.

                          -regds/ jaideep


                          --mj (FULL DISCLOSURE: I sell ScrumWorks. BTW ScrumWorks Basic is still free.)

                          Confidentiality Notice:

                          The information contained in this electronic message and any attachments to this message are intended for the exclusive use of the addressee(s) and may contain confidential or privileged information. If you are not the intended recipient, please notify the sender at admin@... immediately and destroy all the copies of this message and any attachments

                        • A.S. Rawat
                          I think what Pete said and Ken also vetted is all essence of doing SCRUM. First time I looked at the excel template passed on to me made me think of other
                          Message 12 of 25 , Mar 5, 2008
                          • 0 Attachment
                            I think what Pete said and Ken also vetted is all essence of doing SCRUM. First time I looked at the excel template passed on to me made me think of other things which took me off the track instead of getting down with brass tacks to start the scrum.
                            Thanks Pete and Ken.
                             
                            Rawat.

                             
                            On 3/5/08, Jaideep Khanduja <jaideep.khanduja@...> wrote:

                            From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Michael James
                            Sent: 03 March, 2008 21:18
                            To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Freeware/open source SCRUM tool

                             

                            --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "Jaideep Khanduja" <jaideep.khanduja@...>
                            wrote:

                            > As long as your team is centralized, and you are able to work well with
                            > simple excel sheets, there seems to be no need to go for any tools.

                            Have you ever seen a whole team assume collective ownership
                            and control of an Excel spreadsheet?

                            As far as ownership is concerned if it is there in a tool, it has to be there (and can very well be there) even if it is an excel spreadsheet. Tools by no chance create ownership, it comes from within.

                            -regds/ jaideep


                            --mj (FULL DISCLOSURE: I sell ScrumWorks. BTW ScrumWorks Basic is still free.)

                            Confidentiality Notice:

                            The information contained in this electronic message and any attachments to this message are intended for the exclusive use of the addressee(s) and may contain confidential or privileged information. If you are not the intended recipient, please notify the sender at admin@... immediately and destroy all the copies of this message and any attachments


                          • teckmx5
                            ... Hi Pooja, there is an Open Source Scrum Tool: Agilo for Scrum. You can download or try it online. http://www.agile42.com/cms/pages/download/ Have fun Teck
                            Message 13 of 25 , Mar 5, 2008
                            • 0 Attachment
                              --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "poojawandile" <poojawandile@...> wrote:
                              >
                              >
                              > Hi,
                              > Could you please suggest any freeware SCRUM tool?
                              >
                              > Thanks,
                              > Pooja
                              >


                              Hi Pooja,

                              there is an Open Source Scrum Tool: Agilo for Scrum. You can download or try it online.
                              http://www.agile42.com/cms/pages/download/

                              Have fun
                              Teck
                            • Basharat Wani
                              Hey There is another openSource tool called Tacke that I evaluated , you can download it from here . http://www.codeplex.com/Tackle The tool is good. Regards
                              Message 14 of 25 , Mar 5, 2008
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Hey
                                 
                                There is another openSource tool called "Tacke" that I evaluated , you can download it from here .
                                 
                                 
                                The tool is good.
                                 
                                Regards
                                Basharat
                                 
                                 
                                 


                                From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of teckmx5
                                Sent: Wednesday, March 05, 2008 9:54 AM
                                To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Freeware/open source SCRUM tool

                                --- In scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com, "poojawandile" <poojawandile@ ...> wrote:

                                >
                                >
                                > Hi,
                                > Could you please suggest any freeware SCRUM tool?
                                >
                                >
                                Thanks,
                                > Pooja
                                >

                                Hi Pooja,

                                there is an Open Source Scrum Tool: Agilo for Scrum. You can download or try it online.
                                http://www.agile42. com/cms/pages/ download/

                                Have fun
                                Teck

                              • Nicholas Cancelliere
                                I actually took my team off the web-based Scrum tools, I found that they were interacting with the tool more than one another! Folks started to use the idea
                                Message 15 of 25 , Mar 6, 2008
                                • 0 Attachment

                                  I actually took my team off the web-based Scrum tools, I found that they were interacting with the tool more than one another!  Folks started to use the idea of putting a note on a story in the tool (usually buried down on some screen) as communicating and negating the responsibility to actually communicate.  Many conversations would end up starting with "Well Beth I don't understand, because I put a note about this issue on the wiki a couple of days ago - didn't you read it?"

                                  We use a kanban board now and it's a lot better.  Everything is in full view, and if you need to talk to someone you get up and talk to them -- you don't dodge the conversation by conveniently logging a note in a web tool.

                                  While in some settings (like with distributed teams) it's difficult to not use a web-based tool -- I think that teams need to be very mindful when they do use them, and not to treat it as some alternative form of email.  

                                  Communication is a two-way event ... I tell you something and I know you heard me and understand me.  Emailing or jotting a note on a wiki isn't necessarily communicating -- it's when the exchange (I email you back, I comment on your wiki note) that we start communicating.  Make sure your teams never loose sight of this fact.

                                  Sincerely,
                                  Nicholas




                                  On Mar 3, 2008, at 4:38 PM, Ken Schwaber wrote:

                                  Excellent, Pete. Another problem I run into is that enterprises using a Scrum tool mistake that for doing Scrum.
                                  Ken
                                   

                                  From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Pete Deemer
                                  Sent: Monday, March 03, 2008 7:23 AM
                                  To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                                  Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Freeware/open source SCRUM tool
                                   


                                  let me share a story. I once knew a team that was doing scrum quite 
                                  happily, using pencils and paper and post-it notes and not much else. 
                                  but it felt very low tech and old-fashioned to them. as one of them put 
                                  it: this is how my grand-dad used to do things back in his day! so they 
                                  decided to come up with a better approach. they set up a database to 
                                  store all the info that previously was living on paper, and they built a 
                                  bunch of nice web pages for entering and viewing the data. with each 
                                  week that passed, they added more and more features, to the point where 
                                  the tool was getting quite complicated. unfortunately, they found 
                                  themselves spending more and more fixing and extending the tool, which 
                                  took time away from other things. but it was very powerful. instead of 
                                  just one simple burndown chart for the whole team, they now could look 
                                  at individual burndown charts for every member of the team, and they 
                                  could see who was ahead and who was behind. and someone added a wiki 
                                  page that allowed everyone to type in their daily update and blocks, 
                                  which allowed the team to stop doing the daily scrum meeting in person. 
                                  and someone else built a clever tool that automatically create a task 
                                  queue for each team member, so that they always knew exactly what to 
                                  work on; they didn't need to even think about it, the system just told 
                                  them what to do. and management learned about the tool (the team showed 
                                  it off during a sprint review), and asked for the team to create a 
                                  single page for the exec team to look at, which showed the burndown 
                                  chart for every single person in the department, and anyone who was 
                                  behind on their tasks, or on their "delivered versus predicted task 
                                  hours per day" (a new metric someone suggested they monitor, since the 
                                  data was all there in the tool) would show up with a bright red blinking 
                                  flag next to their name. The execs liked this dashboard so much they 
                                  asked for a wap version of the page, so they could check it via their 
                                  blackberry from the car, train, etc., a couple times a day if they 
                                  wanted. Over the course of about two months, what had been a happy and 
                                  productive team somehow evolved into a group of stressed out, unhappy 
                                  individuals all constantly looking over their shoulder, and none of them 
                                  had the faintest idea how they were doing during the sprint, which led 
                                  to missed goals and even closer executive monitoring. Getting them back 
                                  on track was very costly and painful, and it was doubly disappointing 
                                  because the whole detour occurred for no good reason.

                                  I'm not saying that tools are wrong, by any means; for larger projects 
                                  and multi-location teams, they can be helpful. But before going that 
                                  route, I would get very clear on the problem you're trying to solve, and 
                                  be certain that your tool is going to address the underlying issue, and 
                                  not simply disguise it.

                                  ------------ --------- --------- -------
                                  Pete Deemer
                                  GoodAgile
                                  CSM in  Delhi (Gurgaon), March 5-6 - seats still available - full details 
                                  at goodagile.com

                                  poojawandile wrote:
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > I am looking for a tool to manage spint backlog, product backlog,
                                  > issues, risks, burndown chart, etc. Though this can be acheived
                                  > through an excel also, I just thought a tool may offer some more
                                  > features which may not be exactly and easily possible through an
                                  > excel spreadsheet, for delegating activities to team emmebers and
                                  > allowing them to update their tasks on their own. With my limited
                                  > knowledge on Scrum, yes, I would be interested in knowing the pros
                                  > and cons of using a tool against an excel sheet or the need of a
                                  > tool itself.
                                  >
                                  > Thanks,
                                  > Pooja
                                  >
                                  > --- In scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com 
                                  > <mailto:scrumdevelo pment%40yahoogro ups.com>, Pete Deemer
                                  > <petedeemer@ ...> wrote:
                                  > >
                                  > > Hi Pooja, I get this quite often. My first question is always:
                                  > What are
                                  > > the problems you're having that you'd like the tool to solve?
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > > ------------ --------- --------- -------
                                  > > Pete Deemer
                                  > > GoodAgile
                                  > > CSM in  Delhi (Gurgaon), March 5-6 - seats still available - full
                                  > details
                                  > > at goodagile.com
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > > poojawandile wrote:
                                  > > >
                                  > > >
                                  > > > Hi,
                                  > > > Could you please suggest any freeware SCRUM tool?
                                  > > >
                                  > > > Thanks,
                                  > > > Pooja
                                  > > >
                                  > > >
                                  > >
                                  >
                                  >


                                  --
                                  Nicholas Cancelliere
                                  Austin, TX




                                • Murali Yelamanchili
                                  Hi, We use ScrumWorks Basic for our Scrum tool, which is still free. I won t say that it is the only tool we use. We use a combination of ScrumWorks, JIRA and
                                  Message 16 of 25 , Mar 6, 2008
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    Hi,

                                    We use ScrumWorks Basic for our Scrum tool, which is still free. I won't say that it is the only tool we use. We use a combination of ScrumWorks, JIRA and Excel.

                                    As for whether to use tools or not here is my take on it -

                                    Let us not forget the reality today. In India, where I work, we don't often have the luxury of large office spaces with large meeting rooms. Sometimes we make do by just huddling at the Scrummaster's desk and finish the standup. It is next to impossible to get a physical taskboard, because the office space comes at a premium.
                                    It is not ideal, but the best we can do under these conditions. Just to give you an idea, our floor are seats 70 engineers, and we have only 1 room that can accomodate 10 members at best at a time. And there are 11 teams doing Scrum, and if we all want a taskboard in there, and all try to dash into the room for a meeting.
                                    As Manager and Scrummaster, I don't particularly like what I have to do here.
                                    Similarly, post-it notes are rationed, and not in full supply as and when we want them.

                                    We use a distributed tool (ScrumWorks) because our Product Owner works out of Australia. It works most of the time, except for when the PO is off the grid - I mean when he is on the flight or is not able to connect to the Internet (on the beach or a coffee shop :-) )
                                    When he is not connected, he finds it very difficult to record his ideas into the Product backlog, because he cannot access Scrumworks, and uses an Excel spreadsheet to record his ideas, and then syncs it with the backlog inside Scrumworks when he is back on the VPN again. This is a manual task, because Scrumworks is not really good with export/import of information. But we don't waste time trying to fix it, but get along with it, the best we can, and work around it.

                                    Above all this, I am required to produce an executive summary for my bosses once a Sprint ends, and the Scrum tool makes it easy for me as it generates most of the information I require for the report.
                                    Do I like it? No - not really, but I have to do it.

                                    My point is that tools are useful to those who really need them. I think most of us are sane enough not to use a tool just because it is fashionable, or makes us feel good.

                                    The reality is a bit different than we would like it to be - In my case this means - no physical taskboards, no post-it notes (sorry no supply), shortage of markers and certainly no meeting rooms. And a PO, who needs  offline access, combined with upper management who want executive summaries of Sprints.
                                    Using tools makes my life as a manager and scrummaster easier to certain extent, and helps me concentrate more on what I else can do for the team. So I would certainly advocate using them, but also would state, like others have done here, we be judicious in our use of these tools and not think that they offer a solution to all our problems.

                                    Regards,
                                    Murali

                                    ----- Original Message ----
                                    From: Ken Schwaber <ken.schwaber@...>
                                    To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                                    Sent: Tuesday, March 4, 2008 4:08:41 AM
                                    Subject: RE: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Freeware/open source SCRUM tool

                                    Excellent, Pete. Another problem I run into is that enterprises using a Scrum tool mistake that for doing Scrum.

                                    Ken

                                     


                                    From: scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com [mailto: scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com ] On Behalf Of Pete Deemer
                                    Sent: Monday, March 03, 2008 7:23 AM
                                    To: scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com
                                    Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Freeware/open source SCRUM tool

                                     


                                    let me share a story. I once knew a team that was doing scrum quite
                                    happily, using pencils and paper and post-it notes and not much else.
                                    but it felt very low tech and old-fashioned to them. as one of them put
                                    it: this is how my grand-dad used to do things back in his day! so they
                                    decided to come up with a better approach. they set up a database to
                                    store all the info that previously was living on paper, and they built a
                                    bunch of nice web pages for entering and viewing the data. with each
                                    week that passed, they added more and more features, to the point where
                                    the tool was getting quite complicated. unfortunately, they found
                                    themselves spending more and more fixing and extending the tool, which
                                    took time away from other things. but it was very powerful. instead of
                                    just one simple burndown chart for the whole team, they now could look
                                    at individual burndown charts for every member of the team, and they
                                    could see who was ahead and who was behind. and someone added a wiki
                                    page that allowed everyone to type in their daily update and blocks,
                                    which allowed the team to stop doing the daily scrum meeting in person.
                                    and someone else built a clever tool that automatically create a task
                                    queue for each team member, so that they always knew exactly what to
                                    work on; they didn't need to even think about it, the system just told
                                    them what to do. and management learned about the tool (the team showed
                                    it off during a sprint review), and asked for the team to create a
                                    single page for the exec team to look at, which showed the burndown
                                    chart for every single person in the department, and anyone who was
                                    behind on their tasks, or on their "delivered versus predicted task
                                    hours per day" (a new metric someone suggested they monitor, since the
                                    data was all there in the tool) would show up with a bright red blinking
                                    flag next to their name. The execs liked this dashboard so much they
                                    asked for a wap version of the page, so they could check it via their
                                    blackberry from the car, train, etc., a couple times a day if they
                                    wanted. Over the course of about two months, what had been a happy and
                                    productive team somehow evolved into a group of stressed out, unhappy
                                    individuals all constantly looking over their shoulder, and none of them
                                    had the faintest idea how they were doing during the sprint, which led
                                    to missed goals and even closer executive monitoring. Getting them back
                                    on track was very costly and painful, and it was doubly disappointing
                                    because the whole detour occurred for no good reason.

                                    I'm not saying that tools are wrong, by any means; for larger projects
                                    and multi-location teams, they can be helpful. But before going that
                                    route, I would get very clear on the problem you're trying to solve, and
                                    be certain that your tool is going to address the underlying issue, and
                                    not simply disguise it.

                                    ------------ --------- --------- -------
                                    Pete Deemer
                                    GoodAgile
                                    CSM in Delhi (Gurgaon), March 5-6 - seats still available - full details
                                    at goodagile.com

                                    poojawandile wrote:

                                    >
                                    >
                                    > I am looking for a tool to manage spint backlog, product backlog,
                                    > issues, risks, burndown chart, etc. Though this can be acheived
                                    > through an excel also, I just thought a tool may offer some more
                                    > features which may not be exactly and easily possible through an
                                    > excel spreadsheet, for delegating activities to team emmebers and
                                    > allowing them to update their tasks on their own. With my limited
                                    > knowledge on Scrum, yes, I would be interested in knowing the pros
                                    > and cons of using a tool against an excel sheet or the need of a
                                    > tool itself.
                                    >
                                    > Thanks,
                                    > Pooja
                                    >
                                    > --- In scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com
                                    > <mailto:scrumdevelo pment%40yahoogro ups.com>, Pete Deemer
                                    > <petedeemer@ ...> wrote:
                                    > >
                                    > > Hi Pooja, I get this quite often. My first question is always:
                                    > What are
                                    > > the problems you're having that you'd like the tool to solve?
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > > ------------ --------- --------- -------
                                    > > Pete Deemer
                                    > > GoodAgile
                                    > > CSM in Delhi
                                    (Gurgaon), March 5-6 - seats still available - full
                                    > details
                                    > > at goodagile.com
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > > poojawandile wrote:
                                    > > >
                                    > > >
                                    > > > Hi,
                                    > > > Could you please suggest any freeware SCRUM tool?
                                    > > >
                                    > > > Thanks,
                                    > > > Pooja
                                    > > >
                                    > > >
                                    > >
                                    >
                                    >




                                    Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.
                                  • shiraz
                                    HI All Am currently working on an assignment which i thought might share with you so that canddiates looking out for change can be benefitted I have a position
                                    Message 17 of 25 , Mar 6, 2008
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      HI All
                                      Am currently working on an assignment which i thought might share with you so that canddiates looking out for change can be benefitted
                                      I have a position with a Product Development Company for a Manager Role (PM) for Pune Location,
                                      Exp 8-10 Yrs
                                      Candidate will be responsible for handling Scrum Based development team. Should have good expertise in Java/J2EE. He should be a scrum master/scrum certified. Should have handled team of 4-5 engineers earlier. Good exposure to requirements handling and design.
                                      If any one of you is interested plz revert immediately with updated resume with contact details so that i can speak to you and can take it further
                                      Warm Regards
                                      Shiraz


                                      Murali Yelamanchili <murali_yelamanchili@...> wrote:
                                      Hi,

                                      We use ScrumWorks Basic for our Scrum tool, which is still free. I won't say that it is the only tool we use. We use a combination of ScrumWorks, JIRA and Excel.

                                      As for whether to use tools or not here is my take on it -

                                      Let us not forget the reality today. In India, where I work, we don't often have the luxury of large office spaces with large meeting rooms. Sometimes we make do by just huddling at the Scrummaster' s desk and finish the standup. It is next to impossible to get a physical taskboard, because the office space comes at a premium.
                                      It is not ideal, but the best we can do under these conditions. Just to give you an idea, our floor are seats 70 engineers, and we have only 1 room that can accomodate 10 members at best at a time. And there are 11 teams doing Scrum, and if we all want a taskboard in there, and all try to dash into the room for a meeting.
                                      As Manager and Scrummaster, I don't particularly like what I have to do here.
                                      Similarly, post-it notes are rationed, and not in full supply as and when we want them.

                                      We use a distributed tool (ScrumWorks) because our Product Owner works out of Australia. It works most of the time, except for when the PO is off the grid - I mean when he is on the flight or is not able to connect to the Internet (on the beach or a coffee shop :-) )
                                      When he is not connected, he finds it very difficult to record his ideas into the Product backlog, because he cannot access Scrumworks, and uses an Excel spreadsheet to record his ideas, and then syncs it with the backlog inside Scrumworks when he is back on the VPN again. This is a manual task, because Scrumworks is not really good with export/import of information. But we don't waste time trying to fix it, but get along with it, the best we can, and work around it.

                                      Above all this, I am required to produce an executive summary for my bosses once a Sprint ends, and the Scrum tool makes it easy for me as it generates most of the information I require for the report.
                                      Do I like it? No - not really, but I have to do it.

                                      My point is that tools are useful to those who really need them. I think most of us are sane enough not to use a tool just because it is fashionable, or makes us feel good.

                                      The reality is a bit different than we would like it to be - In my case this means - no physical taskboards, no post-it notes (sorry no supply), shortage of markers and certainly no meeting rooms. And a PO, who needs  offline access, combined with upper management who want executive summaries of Sprints.
                                      Using tools makes my life as a manager and scrummaster easier to certain extent, and helps me concentrate more on what I else can do for the team. So I would certainly advocate using them, but also would state, like others have done here, we be judicious in our use of these tools and not think that they offer a solution to all our problems.

                                      Regards,
                                      Murali

                                      ----- Original Message ----
                                      From: Ken Schwaber <ken.schwaber@ verizon.net>
                                      To: scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com
                                      Sent: Tuesday, March 4, 2008 4:08:41 AM
                                      Subject: RE: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Freeware/open source SCRUM tool

                                      Excellent, Pete. Another problem I run into is that enterprises using a Scrum tool mistake that for doing Scrum.
                                      Ken
                                       

                                      From: scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com [mailto: scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com ] On Behalf Of Pete Deemer
                                      Sent: Monday, March 03, 2008 7:23 AM
                                      To: scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com
                                      Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Freeware/open source SCRUM tool
                                       

                                      let me share a story. I once knew a team that was doing scrum quite
                                      happily, using pencils and paper and post-it notes and not much else.
                                      but it felt very low tech and old-fashioned to them. as one of them put
                                      it: this is how my grand-dad used to do things back in his day! so they
                                      decided to come up with a better approach. they set up a database to
                                      store all the info that previously was living on paper, and they built a
                                      bunch of nice web pages for entering and viewing the data. with each
                                      week that passed, they added more and more features, to the point where
                                      the tool was getting quite complicated. unfortunately, they found
                                      themselves spending more and more fixing and extending the tool, which
                                      took time away from other things. but it was very powerful. instead of
                                      just one simple burndown chart for the whole team, they now could look
                                      at individual burndown charts for every member of the team, and they
                                      could see who was ahead and who was behind. and someone added a wiki
                                      page that allowed everyone to type in their daily update and blocks,
                                      which allowed the team to stop doing the daily scrum meeting in person.
                                      and someone else built a clever tool that automatically create a task
                                      queue for each team member, so that they always knew exactly what to
                                      work on; they didn't need to even think about it, the system just told
                                      them what to do. and management learned about the tool (the team showed
                                      it off during a sprint review), and asked for the team to create a
                                      single page for the exec team to look at, which showed the burndown
                                      chart for every single person in the department, and anyone who was
                                      behind on their tasks, or on their "delivered versus predicted task
                                      hours per day" (a new metric someone suggested they monitor, since the
                                      data was all there in the tool) would show up with a bright red blinking
                                      flag next to their name. The execs liked this dashboard so much they
                                      asked for a wap version of the page, so they could check it via their
                                      blackberry from the car, train, etc., a couple times a day if they
                                      wanted. Over the course of about two months, what had been a happy and
                                      productive team somehow evolved into a group of stressed out, unhappy
                                      individuals all constantly looking over their shoulder, and none of them
                                      had the faintest idea how they were doing during the sprint, which led
                                      to missed goals and even closer executive monitoring. Getting them back
                                      on track was very costly and painful, and it was doubly disappointing
                                      because the whole detour occurred for no good reason.

                                      I'm not saying that tools are wrong, by any means; for larger projects
                                      and multi-location teams, they can be helpful. But before going that
                                      route, I would get very clear on the problem you're trying to solve, and
                                      be certain that your tool is going to address the underlying issue, and
                                      not simply disguise it.

                                      ------------ --------- --------- -------
                                      Pete Deemer
                                      GoodAgile
                                      CSM in Delhi (Gurgaon), March 5-6 - seats still available - full details
                                      at goodagile.com

                                      poojawandile wrote:
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > I am looking for a tool to manage spint backlog, product backlog,
                                      > issues, risks, burndown chart, etc. Though this can be acheived
                                      > through an excel also, I just thought a tool may offer some more
                                      > features which may not be exactly and easily possible through an
                                      > excel spreadsheet, for delegating activities to team emmebers and
                                      > allowing them to update their tasks on their own. With my limited
                                      > knowledge on Scrum, yes, I would be interested in knowing the pros
                                      > and cons of using a tool against an excel sheet or the need of a
                                      > tool itself.
                                      >
                                      > Thanks,
                                      > Pooja
                                      >
                                      > --- In scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com
                                      > <mailto:scrumdevelo pment%40yahoogro ups.com>, Pete Deemer
                                      > <petedeemer@ ...> wrote:
                                      > >
                                      > > Hi Pooja, I get this quite often. My first question is always:
                                      > What are
                                      > > the problems you're having that you'd like the tool to solve?
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > > ------------ --------- --------- -------
                                      > > Pete Deemer
                                      > > GoodAgile
                                      > > CSM in Delhi (Gurgaon), March 5-6 - seats still available - full
                                      > details
                                      > > at goodagile.com
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > > poojawandile wrote:
                                      > > >
                                      > > >
                                      > > > Hi,
                                      > > > Could you please suggest any freeware SCRUM tool?
                                      > > >
                                      > > > Thanks,
                                      > > > Pooja
                                      > > >
                                      > > >
                                      > >
                                      >
                                      >



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                                    • shiraz
                                      HI All Am currently working on an assignment which i thought might share with you so that canddiates looking out for change can be benefitted I have a position
                                      Message 18 of 25 , Mar 6, 2008
                                      • 0 Attachment
                                        HI All
                                        Am currently working on an assignment which i thought might share with you so that canddiates looking out for change can be benefitted
                                        I have a position with a Product Development Company for a Manager Role (PM) for Pune Location,
                                        Exp 8-10 Yrs
                                        Candidate will be responsible for handling Scrum Based development team. Should have good expertise in Java/J2EE. He should be a scrum master/scrum certified. Should have handled team of 4-5 engineers earlier. Good exposure to requirements handling and design.
                                        If any one of you is interested plz revert immediately with updated resume with contact details so that i can speak to you and can take it further
                                        Warm Regards
                                        Shiraz


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                                      • Michael Yang
                                        Well, We use Spackle as our scrum tool. regards, -Michael On Thu, Mar 6, 2008 at 7:17 PM, Murali Yelamanchili
                                        Message 19 of 25 , Mar 8, 2008
                                        • 0 Attachment
                                          Well,
                                           
                                          We use Spackle as our scrum tool.
                                           
                                          regards,
                                           
                                          -Michael

                                          On Thu, Mar 6, 2008 at 7:17 PM, Murali Yelamanchili <murali_yelamanchili@...> wrote:

                                          Hi,

                                          We use ScrumWorks Basic for our Scrum tool, which is still free. I won't say that it is the only tool we use. We use a combination of ScrumWorks, JIRA and Excel.

                                          As for whether to use tools or not here is my take on it -

                                          Let us not forget the reality today. In India, where I work, we don't often have the luxury of large office spaces with large meeting rooms. Sometimes we make do by just huddling at the Scrummaster's desk and finish the standup. It is next to impossible to get a physical taskboard, because the office space comes at a premium.
                                          It is not ideal, but the best we can do under these conditions. Just to give you an idea, our floor are seats 70 engineers, and we have only 1 room that can accomodate 10 members at best at a time. And there are 11 teams doing Scrum, and if we all want a taskboard in there, and all try to dash into the room for a meeting.
                                          As Manager and Scrummaster, I don't particularly like what I have to do here.
                                          Similarly, post-it notes are rationed, and not in full supply as and when we want them.

                                          We use a distributed tool (ScrumWorks) because our Product Owner works out of Australia. It works most of the time, except for when the PO is off the grid - I mean when he is on the flight or is not able to connect to the Internet (on the beach or a coffee shop :-) )
                                          When he is not connected, he finds it very difficult to record his ideas into the Product backlog, because he cannot access Scrumworks, and uses an Excel spreadsheet to record his ideas, and then syncs it with the backlog inside Scrumworks when he is back on the VPN again. This is a manual task, because Scrumworks is not really good with export/import of information. But we don't waste time trying to fix it, but get along with it, the best we can, and work around it.

                                          Above all this, I am required to produce an executive summary for my bosses once a Sprint ends, and the Scrum tool makes it easy for me as it generates most of the information I require for the report.
                                          Do I like it? No - not really, but I have to do it.

                                          My point is that tools are useful to those who really need them. I think most of us are sane enough not to use a tool just because it is fashionable, or makes us feel good.

                                          The reality is a bit different than we would like it to be - In my case this means - no physical taskboards, no post-it notes (sorry no supply), shortage of markers and certainly no meeting rooms. And a PO, who needs  offline access, combined with upper management who want executive summaries of Sprints.
                                          Using tools makes my life as a manager and scrummaster easier to certain extent, and helps me concentrate more on what I else can do for the team. So I would certainly advocate using them, but also would state, like others have done here, we be judicious in our use of these tools and not think that they offer a solution to all our problems.

                                          Regards,
                                          Murali

                                          ----- Original Message ----
                                          From: Ken Schwaber <ken.schwaber@...>
                                          To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                                          Sent: Tuesday, March 4, 2008 4:08:41 AM
                                          Subject: RE: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Freeware/open source SCRUM tool

                                          Excellent, Pete. Another problem I run into is that enterprises using a Scrum tool mistake that for doing Scrum.

                                          Ken

                                           


                                          From: scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com [mailto: scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com ] On Behalf Of Pete Deemer
                                          Sent: Monday, March 03, 2008 7:23 AM
                                          To: scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com
                                          Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Freeware/open source SCRUM tool

                                           


                                          let me share a story. I once knew a team that was doing scrum quite
                                          happily, using pencils and paper and post-it notes and not much else.
                                          but it felt very low tech and old-fashioned to them. as one of them put
                                          it: this is how my grand-dad used to do things back in his day! so they
                                          decided to come up with a better approach. they set up a database to
                                          store all the info that previously was living on paper, and they built a
                                          bunch of nice web pages for entering and viewing the data. with each
                                          week that passed, they added more and more features, to the point where
                                          the tool was getting quite complicated. unfortunately, they found
                                          themselves spending more and more fixing and extending the tool, which
                                          took time away from other things. but it was very powerful. instead of
                                          just one simple burndown chart for the whole team, they now could look
                                          at individual burndown charts for every member of the team, and they
                                          could see who was ahead and who was behind. and someone added a wiki
                                          page that allowed everyone to type in their daily update and blocks,
                                          which allowed the team to stop doing the daily scrum meeting in person.
                                          and someone else built a clever tool that automatically create a task
                                          queue for each team member, so that they always knew exactly what to
                                          work on; they didn't need to even think about it, the system just told
                                          them what to do. and management learned about the tool (the team showed
                                          it off during a sprint review), and asked for the team to create a
                                          single page for the exec team to look at, which showed the burndown
                                          chart for every single person in the department, and anyone who was
                                          behind on their tasks, or on their "delivered versus predicted task
                                          hours per day" (a new metric someone suggested they monitor, since the
                                          data was all there in the tool) would show up with a bright red blinking
                                          flag next to their name. The execs liked this dashboard so much they
                                          asked for a wap version of the page, so they could check it via their
                                          blackberry from the car, train, etc., a couple times a day if they
                                          wanted. Over the course of about two months, what had been a happy and
                                          productive team somehow evolved into a group of stressed out, unhappy
                                          individuals all constantly looking over their shoulder, and none of them
                                          had the faintest idea how they were doing during the sprint, which led
                                          to missed goals and even closer executive monitoring. Getting them back
                                          on track was very costly and painful, and it was doubly disappointing
                                          because the whole detour occurred for no good reason.

                                          I'm not saying that tools are wrong, by any means; for larger projects
                                          and multi-location teams, they can be helpful. But before going that
                                          route, I would get very clear on the problem you're trying to solve, and
                                          be certain that your tool is going to address the underlying issue, and
                                          not simply disguise it.

                                          ------------ --------- --------- -------
                                          Pete Deemer
                                          GoodAgile
                                          CSM in Delhi (Gurgaon), March 5-6 - seats still available - full details
                                          at goodagile.com

                                          poojawandile wrote:
                                          >
                                          >
                                          > I am looking for a tool to manage spint backlog, product backlog,
                                          > issues, risks, burndown chart, etc. Though this can be acheived
                                          > through an excel also, I just thought a tool may offer some more
                                          > features which may not be exactly and easily possible through an
                                          > excel spreadsheet, for delegating activities to team emmebers and
                                          > allowing them to update their tasks on their own. With my limited
                                          > knowledge on Scrum, yes, I would be interested in knowing the pros
                                          > and cons of using a tool against an excel sheet or the need of a
                                          > tool itself.
                                          >
                                          > Thanks,
                                          > Pooja
                                          >
                                          > --- In scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com
                                          > <mailto:scrumdevelo pment%40yahoogro ups.com>, Pete Deemer

                                          > <petedeemer@ ...> wrote:
                                          > >
                                          > > Hi Pooja, I get this quite often. My first question is always:
                                          > What are
                                          > > the problems you're having that you'd like the tool to solve?
                                          > >
                                          > >
                                          > > ------------ --------- --------- -------
                                          > > Pete Deemer
                                          > > GoodAgile
                                          > > CSM in Delhi (Gurgaon), March 5-6 - seats still available - full
                                          > details
                                          > > at goodagile.com
                                          > >
                                          > >
                                          > >
                                          > >
                                          > > poojawandile wrote:
                                          > > >
                                          > > >
                                          > > > Hi,
                                          > > > Could you please suggest any freeware SCRUM tool?
                                          > > >
                                          > > > Thanks,
                                          > > > Pooja
                                          > > >
                                          > > >
                                          > >
                                          >
                                          >




                                          Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.


                                        • Daniel Wildt
                                          I have used Scrum Works basic for some projects, it is great and easy to use. Now I m using spreadsheets. I m not using boards and cards cause currently I
                                          Message 20 of 25 , Mar 8, 2008
                                          • 0 Attachment
                                            I have used Scrum Works basic for some projects, it is great and easy to use.

                                            Now I'm using spreadsheets. I'm not using boards and cards cause currently I don't have environment for that  and I'm working with distributed teams. The spreadsheet is going well and it is an easy point of contact for the whole team.

                                            The software must help your team. But the team must be able to run a sprint without the tool.
                                            Try not to use a software tool to control your sprint if you are able to do that in the beginning.
                                            Just to make sure that the team is aware about how to work with the mechanics.

                                            Regards,
                                            Daniel Wildt
                                            http://danielwildt.blogspot.com
                                            http://weblogs.java.net/blog/dwildt/

                                            On Sat, Mar 8, 2008 at 7:01 AM, Michael Yang <michael.cy.yang@...> wrote:

                                            Well,
                                             
                                            We use Spackle as our scrum tool.
                                             
                                            regards,
                                             
                                            -Michael

                                            On Thu, Mar 6, 2008 at 7:17 PM, Murali Yelamanchili <murali_yelamanchili@...> wrote:

                                            Hi,

                                            We use ScrumWorks Basic for our Scrum tool, which is still free. I won't say that it is the only tool we use. We use a combination of ScrumWorks, JIRA and Excel.

                                            As for whether to use tools or not here is my take on it -

                                            Let us not forget the reality today. In India, where I work, we don't often have the luxury of large office spaces with large meeting rooms. Sometimes we make do by just huddling at the Scrummaster's desk and finish the standup. It is next to impossible to get a physical taskboard, because the office space comes at a premium.
                                            It is not ideal, but the best we can do under these conditions. Just to give you an idea, our floor are seats 70 engineers, and we have only 1 room that can accomodate 10 members at best at a time. And there are 11 teams doing Scrum, and if we all want a taskboard in there, and all try to dash into the room for a meeting.
                                            As Manager and Scrummaster, I don't particularly like what I have to do here.
                                            Similarly, post-it notes are rationed, and not in full supply as and when we want them.

                                            We use a distributed tool (ScrumWorks) because our Product Owner works out of Australia. It works most of the time, except for when the PO is off the grid - I mean when he is on the flight or is not able to connect to the Internet (on the beach or a coffee shop :-) )
                                            When he is not connected, he finds it very difficult to record his ideas into the Product backlog, because he cannot access Scrumworks, and uses an Excel spreadsheet to record his ideas, and then syncs it with the backlog inside Scrumworks when he is back on the VPN again. This is a manual task, because Scrumworks is not really good with export/import of information. But we don't waste time trying to fix it, but get along with it, the best we can, and work around it.

                                            Above all this, I am required to produce an executive summary for my bosses once a Sprint ends, and the Scrum tool makes it easy for me as it generates most of the information I require for the report.
                                            Do I like it? No - not really, but I have to do it.

                                            My point is that tools are useful to those who really need them. I think most of us are sane enough not to use a tool just because it is fashionable, or makes us feel good.

                                            The reality is a bit different than we would like it to be - In my case this means - no physical taskboards, no post-it notes (sorry no supply), shortage of markers and certainly no meeting rooms. And a PO, who needs  offline access, combined with upper management who want executive summaries of Sprints.
                                            Using tools makes my life as a manager and scrummaster easier to certain extent, and helps me concentrate more on what I else can do for the team. So I would certainly advocate using them, but also would state, like others have done here, we be judicious in our use of these tools and not think that they offer a solution to all our problems.

                                            Regards,
                                            Murali

                                            ----- Original Message ----
                                            From: Ken Schwaber <ken.schwaber@...>
                                            To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                                            Sent: Tuesday, March 4, 2008 4:08:41 AM
                                            Subject: RE: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Freeware/open source SCRUM tool

                                            Excellent, Pete. Another problem I run into is that enterprises using a Scrum tool mistake that for doing Scrum.

                                            Ken

                                             


                                            From: scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com [mailto: scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com ] On Behalf Of Pete Deemer
                                            Sent: Monday, March 03, 2008 7:23 AM
                                            To: scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com
                                            Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Freeware/open source SCRUM tool

                                             


                                            let me share a story. I once knew a team that was doing scrum quite
                                            happily, using pencils and paper and post-it notes and not much else.
                                            but it felt very low tech and old-fashioned to them. as one of them put
                                            it: this is how my grand-dad used to do things back in his day! so they
                                            decided to come up with a better approach. they set up a database to
                                            store all the info that previously was living on paper, and they built a
                                            bunch of nice web pages for entering and viewing the data. with each
                                            week that passed, they added more and more features, to the point where
                                            the tool was getting quite complicated. unfortunately, they found
                                            themselves spending more and more fixing and extending the tool, which
                                            took time away from other things. but it was very powerful. instead of
                                            just one simple burndown chart for the whole team, they now could look
                                            at individual burndown charts for every member of the team, and they
                                            could see who was ahead and who was behind. and someone added a wiki
                                            page that allowed everyone to type in their daily update and blocks,
                                            which allowed the team to stop doing the daily scrum meeting in person.
                                            and someone else built a clever tool that automatically create a task
                                            queue for each team member, so that they always knew exactly what to
                                            work on; they didn't need to even think about it, the system just told
                                            them what to do. and management learned about the tool (the team showed
                                            it off during a sprint review), and asked for the team to create a
                                            single page for the exec team to look at, which showed the burndown
                                            chart for every single person in the department, and anyone who was
                                            behind on their tasks, or on their "delivered versus predicted task
                                            hours per day" (a new metric someone suggested they monitor, since the
                                            data was all there in the tool) would show up with a bright red blinking
                                            flag next to their name. The execs liked this dashboard so much they
                                            asked for a wap version of the page, so they could check it via their
                                            blackberry from the car, train, etc., a couple times a day if they
                                            wanted. Over the course of about two months, what had been a happy and
                                            productive team somehow evolved into a group of stressed out, unhappy
                                            individuals all constantly looking over their shoulder, and none of them
                                            had the faintest idea how they were doing during the sprint, which led
                                            to missed goals and even closer executive monitoring. Getting them back
                                            on track was very costly and painful, and it was doubly disappointing
                                            because the whole detour occurred for no good reason.

                                            I'm not saying that tools are wrong, by any means; for larger projects
                                            and multi-location teams, they can be helpful. But before going that
                                            route, I would get very clear on the problem you're trying to solve, and
                                            be certain that your tool is going to address the underlying issue, and
                                            not simply disguise it.

                                            ------------ --------- --------- -------
                                            Pete Deemer
                                            GoodAgile
                                            CSM in Delhi (Gurgaon), March 5-6 - seats still available - full details
                                            at goodagile.com

                                            poojawandile wrote:
                                            >
                                            >
                                            > I am looking for a tool to manage spint backlog, product backlog,
                                            > issues, risks, burndown chart, etc. Though this can be acheived
                                            > through an excel also, I just thought a tool may offer some more
                                            > features which may not be exactly and easily possible through an
                                            > excel spreadsheet, for delegating activities to team emmebers and
                                            > allowing them to update their tasks on their own. With my limited
                                            > knowledge on Scrum, yes, I would be interested in knowing the pros
                                            > and cons of using a tool against an excel sheet or the need of a
                                            > tool itself.
                                            >
                                            > Thanks,
                                            > Pooja
                                            >
                                            > --- In scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com
                                            > <mailto:scrumdevelo pment%40yahoogro ups.com>, Pete Deemer

                                            > <petedeemer@ ...> wrote:
                                            > >
                                            > > Hi Pooja, I get this quite often. My first question is always:
                                            > What are
                                            > > the problems you're having that you'd like the tool to solve?
                                            > >
                                            > >
                                            > > ------------ --------- --------- -------
                                            > > Pete Deemer
                                            > > GoodAgile
                                            > > CSM in Delhi (Gurgaon), March 5-6 - seats still available - full
                                            > details
                                            > > at goodagile.com
                                            > >
                                            > >
                                            > >
                                            > >
                                            > > poojawandile wrote:
                                            > > >
                                            > > >
                                            > > > Hi,
                                            > > > Could you please suggest any freeware SCRUM tool?
                                            > > >
                                            > > > Thanks,
                                            > > > Pooja
                                            > > >
                                            > > >
                                            > >
                                            >
                                            >




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