Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: How are we alienating the eXtreme Programming folks?

Expand Messages
  • Clay Dreslough
    I have been a pretty easy convert to XP and Scrum, because I was already using many of the key tenets in the mid-to-late 1990s. Making video games with a huge
    Message 1 of 130 , Feb 27, 2008
      I have been a pretty easy convert to XP and Scrum, because I was already using
      many of the key tenets in the mid-to-late 1990s.

      Making video games with a huge design doc and the waterfall model is a recipe
      for failure -- probably even more than with 'conventional' software. You need an
      iterative approach, because if you don't have a playable game early in the
      development cycle you can't assess if you actually have something "fun" to play.

      However, the one aspect of Agile that I've never had much success with is "Pair
      Programming".

      The programmers that I have managed simply cannot be happy and productive
      following the strict methodology of Pair Programming. As a programmer myself on
      many projects, I have to agree that sitting 2 people at the same computer just
      doesn't work.

      We've had a lot of success trying to focus on the _purpose_ of Pair Programming,
      without actually sitting two people at the same system. We have code reviews.
      And we have implemented "virtual" pairing, where your programming partner is
      assigned to read, understand and comment your code after you check it in. But I
      have never had any success with actual Pair Programming.

      So ... am I missing a key component of XP? Or have other people found the same
      reticence with adopting Pair Programming?

      Are there some valuable gains here that I'm missing? And if so, how would you
      recommend getting programmers to change their habits?

      Thanks!

      Clay

      --
      Clay Dreslough
      President, Sports Mogul Inc.
      cjd@...
      www.sportsmogul.com
    • Bas Vodde
      You, a scrum guy, went to a pub with an XP guy! Shame on you! You should know better than that. Bas
      Message 130 of 130 , Mar 12, 2008
        You, a scrum guy, went to a pub with an XP guy!

        Shame on you! You should know better than that.

        Bas


        On Feb 19, 2008, at 7:33 PM, Michael James wrote:

        > I just went to a London XP pub night and met with a hardcore
        > XP guy who claims to dislike Scrum. This wouldn't be notable
        > except that it's happened before.
        >
        > I queried him on what practices he found useful, and it
        > sounded a lot like Scrum to me, plus the engineering
        > practices we usually recommend learning ASAP to
        > avoid technical debt: (TDD, refactoring, continuous
        > integration, pair programming....). He agreed that
        > many teams fail to adopt these practices without
        > a full-time mentor, learning them incrementally
        > makes sense, and that Scrum is often the path
        > people take to discover this.
        >
        > He also agreed with everything we've been
        > talking about on this group: the importance of
        > story "done" rather than task hours expended,
        > getting the customer in the loop, fixed iterations,
        > retrospectives.... I really couldn't find any
        > contradiction with Scrum.
        >
        > As I see it, Scrum is XP's biggest ally. So where
        > is this resentment coming from?
        >
        > --mj
        >
        >
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.