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Breaking the Ice in Daily Scrums

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  • Andrew Burrows
    Hi there, I m currently working on my first project using Scrum. One of the problems I m encountering is that the daily scrum meetings are fairly awkward. I
    Message 1 of 14 , Oct 30, 2007
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      Hi there,

       

      I’m currently working on my first project using Scrum.  One of the problems I’m encountering is that the daily scrum meetings are fairly awkward.  I have to prompt each person in turn to speak by saying to them, “so how did everything go with you yesterday and what are you looking at today?”  If I don’t do this then we have awkward silence for a while – nobody will step up and start talking about their sprint unless I turn to them and ask them to.

       

      I’m unhappy about this because I want people to feel like they’re accountable to everyone on the team, not to be accountable to me.  I don’t want people to be waiting to be prompted to speak about their work – I want them to be dynamic and discuss things openly.

       

      The team is very small and everyone’s comfortable around each other, so it’s not due to any shyness.  It’s also true that once conversation has started people will generally talk freely. 

       

      Has anyone else who’s encountered this found a solution for it?

       

      Thanks!

       

      Andrew Burrows
      Senior Producer/Designer

      Large Animal Games
      115 West 29th St. , New York

      Mobile - 917-312-6267
      Email - andy@...

       

    • Marco Milone
      Get a ball (or any item which your team would be comfortable with) and have people pass it to the person they want to hear from, until everybody has spoken. It
      Message 2 of 14 , Oct 30, 2007
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        Get a ball (or any item which your team would be comfortable with) and have people pass it to the person they want to hear from, until everybody has spoken.

        It is quite natural that daily stand-ups begin as reporting-to-management-like meetings. It takes time for people to learn to take back their responsibility and sense of ownership, which they have had to give up previously, by learning to "do what you are asked to".

        I have found that it also helps to make the team focus on the burndown chart and have them come up with insights/comments as to how the team is doing in terms of delivering what they committed to, what blockers have impacted the velocity, whether someone needs help to finish off a story, etc.

        It also takes effort for management to learn to let go of their thrist for control and power.

        I always think of it as a parents & children relationship, where the child slowly grows and learns to take ownership of his own actions, and the parents learn to let go and provide an encouraging environment for change to take place in their children. These two are reciprocal, and one action reinforces the other.

        All the best,

        Marco



        ________________________________

        From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com on behalf of Andrew Burrows
        Sent: Tue 30/10/2007 14:02
        To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [scrumdevelopment] Breaking the Ice in Daily Scrums



        Hi there,



        I'm currently working on my first project using Scrum. One of the problems I'm encountering is that the daily scrum meetings are fairly awkward. I have to prompt each person in turn to speak by saying to them, "so how did everything go with you yesterday and what are you looking at today?" If I don't do this then we have awkward silence for a while - nobody will step up and start talking about their sprint unless I turn to them and ask them to.



        I'm unhappy about this because I want people to feel like they're accountable to everyone on the team, not to be accountable to me. I don't want people to be waiting to be prompted to speak about their work - I want them to be dynamic and discuss things openly.



        The team is very small and everyone's comfortable around each other, so it's not due to any shyness. It's also true that once conversation has started people will generally talk freely.



        Has anyone else who's encountered this found a solution for it?



        Thanks!



        Andrew Burrows
        Senior Producer/Designer
        Large Animal Games
        115 West 29th St., New York
        Mobile - 917-312-6267
        Email - andy@...





        For the most important conference on Software testing and quality visit www.sqs-conferences.com

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      • Henrik Kniberg
        ... Have you tried just holding your breath and waiting? Will they actually stand and stare at each other in complete silence for 15 minutes? Is there a
        Message 3 of 14 , Oct 30, 2007
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          On 10/30/07, Andrew Burrows <andy@...> wrote:
          >
          > I'm currently working on my first project using Scrum.
          > One of the problems I'm encountering is that the daily scrum meetings
          > are fairly awkward. I have to prompt each person in turn to speak by
          > saying to them, "so how did everything go with you yesterday and what
          > are you looking at today?" If I don't do this then we have awkward silence
          > for a while – nobody will step up and start talking about their sprint unless
          > I turn to them and ask them to.

          Have you tried just holding your breath and waiting? Will they
          actually stand and stare at each other in complete silence for 15
          minutes? Is there a default ordering, like the first person to your
          right starts?

          If they are reporting to you (i.e. looking at you rather than each
          other), have you tried moving and standing behind the person talking?

          These little tricks seem to work in many cases :o)

          /Henrik

          --
          Henrik Kniberg
          http://www.crisp.se
          +46 (0)70 492 5284
        • Nicholas Cancelliere
          I would gently remind everyone what the purpose of the meeting is. You can even make a little wall poster with a giant post-it with the 3 questions on it and
          Message 4 of 14 , Oct 30, 2007
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            I would gently remind everyone what the purpose of the meeting is.  You can even make a little wall poster with a giant post-it with the 3 questions on it and some reminders.  I have one I keep near the area where we standup that reminds people to plan the day, don't leave the meeting confused, don't story tell, don't solve problems, etc.

            Then you can also simply just go around the circle ... instead of waiting for people to volunteer.  Just start with the person on your left and tell them to go around the circle.  After a while the team will begin to rely on this courtesy to help queue one another when it's their turn to talk, even after the "awkward stage."

            I hope these two tid-bits help.  Oh!  And to make it so they're not being accountable to you - disengage.  Stand a little outside the circle, don't make eye-contact (even if you have to purposefully look out the window, at the floor/ceiling, or pretend you're reviewing some memo in your hand).  This will make them start to look at one another and be less focused on you.

            Nicholas


            On Oct 30, 2007, at 9:02 AM, Andrew Burrows wrote:

            Hi there,
             
            I’m currently working on my first project using Scrum.  One of the problems I’m encountering is that the daily scrum meetings are fairly awkward.  I have to prompt each person in turn to speak by saying to them, “so how did everything go with you yesterday and what are you looking at today?”  If I don’t do this then we have awkward silence for a while – nobody will step up and start talking about their sprint unless I turn to them and ask them to.
             
            I’m unhappy about this because I want people to feel like they’re accountable to everyone on the team, not to be accountable to me.  I don’t want people to be waiting to be prompted to speak about their work – I want them to be dynamic and discuss things openly.
             
            The team is very small and everyone’s comfortable around each other, so it’s not due to any shyness.  It’s also true that once conversation has started people will generally talk freely. 
             
            Has anyone else who’s encountered this found a solution for it?
             
            Thanks!
             
            Andrew Burrows
            Senior Producer/Designer

            Large Animal Games
            115 West 29th St. ,  New York

            Mobile - 917-312-6267
            Email - andy@...
             

            ---
            Nicholas Cancelliere
            Austin, TX



          • banshee858
            ... Try bringing food! Also, try not looking at the people when they talk to you. Look at the other team members while they talk and gauge their interest in
            Message 5 of 14 , Oct 30, 2007
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              >
              > Has anyone else who's encountered this found a solution for it?
              >
              Try bringing food!

              Also, try not looking at the people when they talk to you. Look at
              the other team members while they talk and gauge their interest in the
              speaker. I would also privately ask the people who "get it", to
              address the Team and not me.

              Carlton
            • Tobias Mayer
              Marco, I believe that thinking of the scrum master/team relationship as being akin to a parent/child relationship is very unhealthy. It is patronizing and
              Message 6 of 14 , Oct 31, 2007
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                Marco,
                I believe that thinking of the scrum master/team relationship as being
                akin to a parent/child relationship is very unhealthy. It is
                patronizing and rather insulting to look upon, or treat a group of
                intelligent, skilled, qualified people as children. Surely there is a
                better metaphor to describe this relationship.
                Tobias


                --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "Marco Milone"
                <marco.milone@...> wrote:
                >
                > Get a ball (or any item which your team would be comfortable with) and
                have people pass it to the person they want to hear from, until
                everybody has spoken.
                >
                > It is quite natural that daily stand-ups begin as
                reporting-to-management-like meetings. It takes time for people to learn
                to take back their responsibility and sense of ownership, which they
                have had to give up previously, by learning to "do what you are asked
                to".
                >
                > I have found that it also helps to make the team focus on the burndown
                chart and have them come up with insights/comments as to how the team is
                doing in terms of delivering what they committed to, what blockers have
                impacted the velocity, whether someone needs help to finish off a story,
                etc.
                >
                > It also takes effort for management to learn to let go of their thrist
                for control and power.
                >
                > I always think of it as a parents & children relationship, where the
                child slowly grows and learns to take ownership of his own actions, and
                the parents learn to let go and provide an encouraging environment for
                change to take place in their children. These two are reciprocal, and
                one action reinforces the other.
                >
                > All the best,
                >
                > Marco
                >
                >
                >
                > ________________________________
                >
                > From: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com on behalf of Andrew Burrows
                > Sent: Tue 30/10/2007 14:02
                > To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: [scrumdevelopment] Breaking the Ice in Daily Scrums
                >
                >
                >
                > Hi there,
                >
                >
                >
                > I'm currently working on my first project using Scrum. One of the
                problems I'm encountering is that the daily scrum meetings are fairly
                awkward. I have to prompt each person in turn to speak by saying to
                them, "so how did everything go with you yesterday and what are you
                looking at today?" If I don't do this then we have awkward silence for
                a while - nobody will step up and start talking about their sprint
                unless I turn to them and ask them to.
                >
                >
                >
                > I'm unhappy about this because I want people to feel like they're
                accountable to everyone on the team, not to be accountable to me. I
                don't want people to be waiting to be prompted to speak about their work
                - I want them to be dynamic and discuss things openly.
                >
                >
                >
                > The team is very small and everyone's comfortable around each other,
                so it's not due to any shyness. It's also true that once conversation
                has started people will generally talk freely.
                >
                >
                >
                > Has anyone else who's encountered this found a solution for it?
                >
                >
                >
                > Thanks!
                >
                >
                >
                > Andrew Burrows
                > Senior Producer/Designer
                > Large Animal Games
                > 115 West 29th St., New York
                > Mobile - 917-312-6267
                > Email - andy@...
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > For the most important conference on Software testing and quality
                visit www.sqs-conferences.com
                >
                > This e-mail may contain confidential and/or privileged information. If
                you are not the intended recipient (or have received this e-mail in
                error) please notify the sender immediately and destroy this e-mail. Any
                unauthorised copying, disclosure or distribution of the material in this
                e-mail is strictly forbidden.
                >
                > SQS-UK: SQS Group Limited | Incorporated in England and Wales |
                Registered No. 2857864 | VAT No. 788 1795 61
                > SQS-Ire: SQS Software Quality Systems (Ireland) Limited |
                Incorporated in Ireland | Registered No. 307763 | Vat No. IE6327763G
                > SQS-SA: South African Branch office of SQS Group Limited | Registered
                in South Africa | Registered No. 2004/010639/10 | Vat No. 40602176781
                >
              • Tobias Mayer
                ... Have to say I disagree with this too. It is another form of patriarchy, only a tiny step away from command-and-control in the scale of organizational
                Message 7 of 14 , Oct 31, 2007
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                  > Try bringing food!
                  Have to say I disagree with this too. It is another form of patriarchy,
                  only a tiny step away from command-and-control in the scale of
                  organizational health. besides, the meeting is only fifteen minutes
                  long. No one's gonna talk with a mouthful of food.

                  Tobias


                  --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "banshee858" <cnett858@...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  > >
                  > > Has anyone else who's encountered this found a solution for it?
                  > >
                  > Try bringing food!
                  >
                  > Also, try not looking at the people when they talk to you. Look at
                  > the other team members while they talk and gauge their interest in the
                  > speaker. I would also privately ask the people who "get it", to
                  > address the Team and not me.
                  >
                  > Carlton
                  >
                • Tobias Mayer
                  Andrew, Does your team use a physical task board, with stories and tasks on cards or post-it notes that can be moved as they are completed? More generally, do
                  Message 8 of 14 , Oct 31, 2007
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                    Andrew,

                    Does your team use a physical task board, with stories and tasks on
                    cards or post-it notes that can be moved as they are completed?

                    More generally, do the team members have a sense of discrete "tasks"
                    that they commit to and complete within a single working day? If they
                    do, this forms the basis for the "what did I do" and "what will I do"
                    questions. The physical board helps, because it engages people in a
                    very pragmatic way.

                    If the team do not have discrete tasks that can be completed in a day,
                    ask yourself: why not? ...and then ask the team.

                    Tobias



                    --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "Andrew Burrows" <andy@...>
                    wrote:
                    >
                    > Hi there,
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > I'm currently working on my first project using Scrum. One of the
                    problems
                    > I'm encountering is that the daily scrum meetings are fairly awkward.
                    I
                    > have to prompt each person in turn to speak by saying to them, "so how
                    did
                    > everything go with you yesterday and what are you looking at today?"
                    If I
                    > don't do this then we have awkward silence for a while - nobody will
                    step up
                    > and start talking about their sprint unless I turn to them and ask
                    them to.
                    >
                    > I'm unhappy about this because I want people to feel like they're
                    > accountable to everyone on the team, not to be accountable to me. I
                    don't
                    > want people to be waiting to be prompted to speak about their work - I
                    want
                    > them to be dynamic and discuss things openly.
                    >
                    > The team is very small and everyone's comfortable around each other,
                    so it's
                    > not due to any shyness. It's also true that once conversation has
                    started
                    > people will generally talk freely.
                    >
                    > Has anyone else who's encountered this found a solution for it?
                    >
                    > Thanks!
                    >
                    > Andrew Burrows
                  • banshee858
                    ... Tobias, I respect you immensely, but I think you are wrong to make such a blanket statement. I had a dead, stale Daily Scrum and the day I brought food
                    Message 9 of 14 , Oct 31, 2007
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                      >
                      > > Try bringing food!
                      >
                      > Have to say I disagree with this too. It is another form of
                      > patriarchy, only a tiny step away from command-and-control in the
                      > scale of organizational health. besides, the meeting is only
                      > fifteen minutes long. No one's gonna talk with a mouthful of food.
                      >
                      Tobias, I respect you immensely, but I think you are wrong to make
                      such a blanket statement. I had a dead, stale Daily Scrum and the day
                      I brought food was the day these people loosened up and began to
                      buy-in to the whole Scrum process. It also got people to come on time
                      since if you were late for your Daily Scrum, the offender had to "pay
                      the penalty" of bringing food for the Team the next day.

                      Carlton
                    • Andrew Badera
                      My first exposure to Scrum was at Xerox ... I was new, I hadn t worked on a team in over 3 years, there was definitely some nerves and anxiety in play, and not
                      Message 10 of 14 , Oct 31, 2007
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                        My first exposure to Scrum was at Xerox ... I was new, I hadn't worked on a team in over 3 years, there was definitely some nerves and anxiety in play, and not just on my part. But, after not too many lunches and whatnot with the team, either in whole or part, the anxiety dissipated, and Scrum chats were cake.

                        I'm currently working to get Scrum going at my current dayjob employer. I was here for six months or so before we started the initiative. We all knew each other, had worked with each other, had lunches with each other, had been angry and pleased with each others' work. Scrum is cake -- there's no issue with anyone speaking, whatsoever.

                        Don't make it all about Scrum meetings. Engage in team building outside the context of Scrum. Go play paintball. Go to lunch. Go to happy hour. Have a scavenger hunt. Go to a ball game. Simply encourage social activities in general, and I think you'll be rewarded during daily Scrum specifically.

                        --Andrew Badera



                        On 10/31/07, banshee858 <cnett858@...> wrote:


                        >
                        > > Try bringing food!
                        >
                        > Have to say I disagree with this too. It is another form of
                        > patriarchy, only a tiny step away from command-and-control in the
                        > scale of organizational health. besides, the meeting is only
                        > fifteen minutes long. No one's gonna talk with a mouthful of food.
                        >
                        Tobias, I respect you immensely, but I think you are wrong to make
                        such a blanket statement. I had a dead, stale Daily Scrum and the day
                        I brought food was the day these people loosened up and began to
                        buy-in to the whole Scrum process. It also got people to come on time
                        since if you were late for your Daily Scrum, the offender had to "pay
                        the penalty" of bringing food for the Team the next day.

                        Carlton


                      • Sam Roberts
                        ... It sounds like you are inviting people to come forward at random? So nobody knows who is supposed to speak next? We start with the last person to arrive in
                        Message 11 of 14 , Oct 31, 2007
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                          On Wed, Oct 31, 2007 at 05:56:25PM -0000, Tobias Mayer wrote:
                          > > I'm currently working on my first project using Scrum. One of the
                          > problems I'm encountering is that the daily scrum meetings are fairly
                          > awkward. I have to prompt each person in turn to speak by saying to
                          > them, "so how did everything go with you yesterday and what are you
                          > looking at today?" If I don't do this then we have awkward silence for
                          > a while - nobody will step up and start talking about their sprint
                          > unless I turn to them and ask them to.

                          It sounds like you are inviting people to come forward at random? So
                          nobody knows who is supposed to speak next?

                          We start with the last person to arrive in the office, and go to the
                          left. People know its their turn. After a few days of going in a circle
                          asking "what did you do yesterday? what will you do today? any
                          impediments?" it'll be automatic. Also, should things break into
                          conversation?

                          Sam
                        • Tobias Mayer
                          Hi Carlton, yes it was a blanket statement, and of course I do not know your context (and I respect you also). I just happen to think though that this whole
                          Message 12 of 14 , Oct 31, 2007
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                            Hi Carlton,

                            yes it was a blanket statement, and of course I do not know your context
                            (and I respect you also). I just happen to think though that this whole
                            "bring food" thing that seems to be so popular in Scrum circles is
                            loaded with old-world think. It is patronizing and assumes an us/them
                            dynamic: feed the masses... keep them in line. I think we (qua Scrum
                            Masters) should be finding healthier ways to interact with team members,
                            ways that are a level or two above satisfying base needs.

                            Team members bringing food and sharing, well, that's something
                            altogether different.

                            Tobias



                            --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "banshee858" <cnett858@...>
                            wrote:
                            >
                            >
                            > >
                            > > > Try bringing food!
                            > >
                            > > Have to say I disagree with this too. It is another form of
                            > > patriarchy, only a tiny step away from command-and-control in the
                            > > scale of organizational health. besides, the meeting is only
                            > > fifteen minutes long. No one's gonna talk with a mouthful of food.
                            > >
                            > Tobias, I respect you immensely, but I think you are wrong to make
                            > such a blanket statement. I had a dead, stale Daily Scrum and the day
                            > I brought food was the day these people loosened up and began to
                            > buy-in to the whole Scrum process. It also got people to come on time
                            > since if you were late for your Daily Scrum, the offender had to "pay
                            > the penalty" of bringing food for the Team the next day.
                            >
                            > Carlton
                            >
                          • Roy Morien
                            I have to say that it surprises me somewhat that there is even such a need for interesting little ploys to get people going at the Scrum meetings. Passing a
                            Message 13 of 14 , Nov 1, 2007
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                              I have to say that it surprises me somewhat that there is even such a need for interesting little ploys to get people going at the Scrum meetings. Passing a ball seems reminiscent of kindergarten, and 'bring food' seems a little 'pizza and beer for the game'.
                               
                              I will probably not many friends by saying this, but ... surely in the IT industry we are dealing with supposedly well educated, intelligent folks who just do not need animal balloons to make their work day interesting. Or are we? There does seem to be a lot of agonising in these parts about how to get people cooperating and cooperative. Is it a feature of IS people that they are so irresponsible, so unprofessional, so difficult to get cooperation from, that (what I see to be ) silly little ploys must be used all the time to hold their attention?
                               
                              I'm all for the inscribed coffee cups and tee shirts that say "I did it, and survived" sort of nonsense ... but it is harmless nonsense and fun, and does acknowledge a job well done, or a difficult situation overcome. But 'bring food' and 'pass the ball' ... really folks??
                               
                              Regards,
                              Roy Morien





                              To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                              From: tobyanon@...
                              Date: Wed, 31 Oct 2007 17:56:25 +0000
                              Subject: [scrumdevelopment] Re: Breaking the Ice in Daily Scrums

                              Marco,
                              I believe that thinking of the scrum master/team relationship as being
                              akin to a parent/child relationship is very unhealthy. It is
                              patronizing and rather insulting to look upon, or treat a group of
                              intelligent, skilled, qualified people as children. Surely there is a
                              better metaphor to describe this relationship.
                              Tobias

                              --- In scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com, "Marco Milone"
                              <marco.milone@ ...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Get a ball (or any item which your team would be comfortable with) and
                              have people pass it to the person they want to hear from, until
                              everybody has spoken.
                              >
                              > It is quite natural that daily stand-ups begin as
                              reporting-to- management- like meetings. It takes time for people to learn
                              to take back their responsibility and sense of ownership, which they
                              have had to give up previously, by learning to "do what you are asked
                              to".
                              >
                              > I have found that it also helps to make the team focus on the burndown
                              chart and have them come up with insights/comments as to how the team is
                              doing in terms of delivering what they committed to, what blockers have
                              impacted the velocity, whether someone needs help to finish off a story,
                              etc.
                              >
                              > It also takes effort for management to learn to let go of their thrist
                              for control and power.
                              >
                              > I always think of it as a parents & children relationship, where the
                              child slowly grows and learns to take ownership of his own actions, and
                              the parents learn to let go and provide an encouraging environment for
                              change to take place in their children. These two are reciprocal, and
                              one action reinforces the other.
                              >
                              > All the best,
                              >
                              > Marco
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > ____________ _________ _________ __
                              >
                              > From: scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com on behalf of Andrew Burrows
                              > Sent: Tue 30/10/2007 14:02
                              > To: scrumdevelopment@ yahoogroups. com
                              > Subject: [scrumdevelopment] Breaking the Ice in Daily Scrums
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > Hi there,
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > I'm currently working on my first project using Scrum. One of the
                              problems I'm encountering is that the daily scrum meetings are fairly
                              awkward. I have to prompt each person in turn to speak by saying to
                              them, "so how did everything go with you yesterday and what are you
                              looking at today?" If I don't do this then we have awkward silence for
                              a while - nobody will step up and start talking about their sprint
                              unless I turn to them and ask them to.
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > I'm unhappy about this because I want people to feel like they're
                              accountable to everyone on the team, not to be accountable to me. I
                              don't want people to be waiting to be prompted to speak about their work
                              - I want them to be dynamic and discuss things openly.
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > The team is very small and everyone's comfortable around each other,
                              so it's not due to any shyness. It's also true that once conversation
                              has started people will generally talk freely.
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > Has anyone else who's encountered this found a solution for it?
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > Thanks!
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > Andrew Burrows
                              > Senior Producer/Designer
                              > Large Animal Games
                              > 115 West 29th St., New York
                              > Mobile - 917-312-6267
                              > Email - andy@...
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > For the most important conference on Software testing and quality
                              visit www.sqs-conferences .com
                              >
                              > This e-mail may contain confidential and/or privileged information. If
                              you are not the intended recipient (or have received this e-mail in
                              error) please notify the sender immediately and destroy this e-mail. Any
                              unauthorised copying, disclosure or distribution of the material in this
                              e-mail is strictly forbidden.
                              >
                              > SQS-UK: SQS Group Limited | Incorporated in England and Wales |
                              Registered No. 2857864 | VAT No. 788 1795 61
                              > SQS-Ire: SQS Software Quality Systems (Ireland) Limited |
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                              > SQS-SA: South African Branch office of SQS Group Limited | Registered
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                            • Joakim Karlsson
                              Andrew, I would ask the team the same question that you posted to the list. Either at the daily scrum or at the retrospective. Hey, I m noticing that the
                              Message 14 of 14 , Nov 2, 2007
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                                Andrew,

                                I would ask the team the same question that you posted to the list.
                                Either at the daily scrum or at the retrospective.

                                "Hey, I'm noticing that the daily scrums isn't going as well they
                                should. Here's what I see. Has anyone else noticed the same thing?"

                                Try getting a discussion within the team going so that you have
                                something to refer to during the daily scrums.

                                --
                                Regards,
                                Joakim Karlsson
                                http://www.jkarlsson.com/blog

                                On 10/30/07, Andrew Burrows <andy@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > I'm unhappy about this because I want people to feel like they're accountable to everyone on the team, not to be accountable to me. I don't want people to be waiting to be prompted to speak about their work – I want them to be dynamic and discuss things openly.
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