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Réf. : RE: [scrumdevelopment] Scrum on a Page ( really "Its; your ship ...")

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  • gery.derbier@solystic.com
    ... competitor? Isn t it an issue of physical and corporeal destruction versus financial destruction? I recommend you read the book Coopetition . You ll see
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 26, 2004

      >> Isn't any capitalist business, in part, out to "destroy" any competitor? Isn't it an issue of physical and corporeal destruction versus financial destruction?

      I recommend you read the book "Coopetition". You'll see that it is not always the best thing to do to eliminate a competitor. It is a possible strategy to cooperate to get the pie bigger and then compete to get the largest slice. Thus the word coopetition.

      Géry.




      "Tiseo, Paul" <tiseo.paul@...>

      26/01/04 16:59
      Veuillez répondre à scrumdevelopment

             
              Pour :        scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
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              Objet :        RE: [scrumdevelopment] Scrum on a Page (really "Its; your ship ...")





      Some comments/questions:

       

      A) Isn't any capitalist business, in part, out to "destroy" any competitor? Isn't it an issue of physical and corporeal destruction versus financial destruction?

       

      B) One can "lead through fear" (a.k.a. command-and-control) or lead through empowerment (a.k.a. something like Scrum) in either war or software development. The fact that lives are at stake might push more military structure towards CandC, perhaps with good reason.

       

      C) What business doesn't need "operational excellence" first and foremost? What are other things a business might need more than "operational excellence"?

       

      Not intending to be antagonistic. I find this discussion interesting…

       

      _________________________________

      Paul Tiseo, Systems Programmer

      Research Computing Facility

      Mayo Clinic Jacksonville, Griffin371

      tiseo.paul@...

        

       






      From:Stan Rifkin [mailto:sr@...]
      Sent: Monday, January 26, 2004 10:20 AM
      To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Scrum on a Page (really "Its; your ship ...")

       

      Here is a comment about "It's your ship ..." from a career naval officer who now works for us:

      I haven't come across this book, Stan.  I am a member of the Naval Institute and the Naval Institute Press normally publishes books like this.  I'm surprised that this book was published by a business publishing house.  Captain Abrashoffis probably sowing the fields for his next career. 

      Not that it is bad to do that, only that I would think he might be looking to show that management and leadership for his ship is much the same as management and leadership of a large business organization.  This is a notion that has been suggested over and over before, but I think it is fundamentally flawed because a Navy ship has no profit motive to deal with and a business has no "mission" involving the total destruction and death of an enemy effected through complete obedience of the crew to commands of superiors (well, there is Microsoft). 

      All ships, Navy or commercial, would be perfect examples of organizations that need operational excellence more than anything else.  While I was in Navy ships and actively leading a division or department, there were many influential officers who authored books and articles about how to effectively "fight" the ship, the ultimate objective of a Navy ship, and satisfy the ship's various mission areas (ASW, AAW, ASUW, land attack, force projection, etc.).  There were always sections on how to create an excellent team for propulsion, ship handling, weaponry, tactical communications, underway replenishment, navigation, and damage control.  Since Admiral Elmo Zumwaltbecame the CNO in 1970, there has been increasing emphasis on personnel management and leadership excellence, but it is always in the context of managing and leading a "captive" audience, as we used to say.  No one can get fed up and quit on the spot, so much of the advice includes the concept that folks will get over petty grievances in time and see the big picture.  In business orgs, attrition would become unacceptable if the Navy way was implemented in the fashion as I used to know it.




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    • J. B. Rainsberger
      ... The CEO of 1-800-GOT-JUNK made just that point in a recent interview. What he wants most is a pretty good competitor. -- J. B. Rainsberger, Diaspar
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 27, 2004
        gery.derbier@... wrote:

        >
        > >> Isn't any capitalist business, in part, out to "destroy" any
        > competitor? Isn't it an issue of physical and corporeal destruction
        > versus financial destruction?
        >
        > I recommend you read the book "Coopetition". You'll see that it is not
        > always the best thing to do to eliminate a competitor. It is a possible
        > strategy to cooperate to get the pie bigger and then compete to get the
        > largest slice. Thus the word coopetition.

        The CEO of 1-800-GOT-JUNK made just that point in a recent interview.
        What he wants most is a pretty good competitor.
        --
        J. B. Rainsberger,
        Diaspar Software Services
        http://www.diasparsoftware.com :: +1 416 791-8603
        Let's write software that people understand
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