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Scrum on a Page

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  • Bill Wake
    To help me deepen my understanding of Scrum, I ve created a one-page summary of development in Scrum. It s at http://xp123.com/xplor/xp0401/index.shtml; I d
    Message 1 of 22 , Jan 24, 2004
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      To help me deepen my understanding of Scrum, I've created a one-page
      summary of development in Scrum. It's at
      http://xp123.com/xplor/xp0401/index.shtml;
      I'd welcome your feedback.

      (And if you want to compare, "XP on a Page" is at
      http://www.xp123.com/xplor/xp0202/index.shtml)

      Thanks!
      Bill Wake William.Wake@... www.xp123.com
    • Mike Cohn
      Hi Bill-- I like this. I think I ll print a few out and hang them around the office, if that s OK with you. This will help with some of the customers who are
      Message 2 of 22 , Jan 24, 2004
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        Hi Bill--
        I like this. I think I'll print a few out and hang them around the office,
        if that's OK with you. This will help with some of the customers who are
        very supportive of what we're doing but who don't know all our terms.
        Interestingly, this group of stakeholders have really taken to the
        chickens/pigs idea. They remind each other not to ask questions in the Daily
        Scrum. I never have to do it!

        The only thing I'd change on your Scrum-on-a-Page is that I believe the
        standard advice is to do the Sprint Planning Meeting in 1/2 day. (We
        normally do the Sprint Planning and Sprint Review meetings on the same day
        so combined they are a full day sometimes.)

        Great work.

        Thanks for sharing it,
        Mike

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Bill Wake [mailto:william.wake@...]
        Sent: Saturday, January 24, 2004 9:46 PM
        To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [scrumdevelopment] Scrum on a Page

        To help me deepen my understanding of Scrum, I've created a one-page
        summary of development in Scrum. It's at
        http://xp123.com/xplor/xp0401/index.shtml;
        I'd welcome your feedback.

        (And if you want to compare, "XP on a Page" is at
        http://www.xp123.com/xplor/xp0202/index.shtml)

        Thanks!
        Bill Wake William.Wake@... www.xp123.com




        To Post a message, send it to: scrumdevelopment@...
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        scrumdevelopment-unsubscribe@...

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      • Ken Schwaber
        Bill, Nice; only one change - the team manages the Sprint Backlog to manage themselves. If the ScrumMaster does it for them, then it appears to them that
        Message 3 of 22 , Jan 25, 2004
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          Bill,
          Nice; only one change - the team manages the Sprint Backlog to manage
          themselves. If the ScrumMaster does it for them, then it appears to them
          that he/she is managing them.

          Mike,
          The Sprint Planning meeting is 1 day ... the first 1/2 day is selecting the
          product backlog to work on for the next Sprint, the second 1/2 day is the
          team turning that product backlog into sprint backlog.
          Ken

          -----Original Message-----
          From: Bill Wake [mailto:william.wake@...]
          Sent: Saturday, January 24, 2004 11:46 PM
          To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [scrumdevelopment] Scrum on a Page


          To help me deepen my understanding of Scrum, I've created a one-page
          summary of development in Scrum. It's at
          http://xp123.com/xplor/xp0401/index.shtml;
          I'd welcome your feedback.

          (And if you want to compare, "XP on a Page" is at
          http://www.xp123.com/xplor/xp0202/index.shtml)

          Thanks!
          Bill Wake William.Wake@... www.xp123.com




          To Post a message, send it to: scrumdevelopment@...
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          scrumdevelopment-unsubscribe@...

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        • Chak
          I may be the bull in the China shop , who is talking out of turn, but if the Scrum Master , who i understand would be in constant touch with the customer, as
          Message 4 of 22 , Jan 25, 2004
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            I may be the bull in the China shop , who is talking
            out of turn, but if the 'Scrum Master', who i
            understand would be in constant touch with the
            customer, as well as have a perspective of changing
            scenarios , be in a better position to decide what
            items of backlog to drop/shuffle ?

            One thing that baffles me in the 'Agile process' (with
            my little knowledge of it), is that it seems to
            believe in headless teams. To me , a software project
            is like the voyage of a ship, because it is buffetted
            by many winds , and one of the 'winds' is that many of
            the people on the team are with varying levels of
            experience, and a ship can have only ONE captain, even
            if it is the Titanic.

            I find that SCRUM and XP seem to delegate planning
            more and more to the team. This may be fine in an
            ideal world, but in a software project, which is
            typically crisis prone, i would rather have ONE
            captain, who breathes down the neck , and goes down
            with the ship if necessary...

            <RANT> Sorry, the expressions of an 'Agile-challenged'
            person.
            </RANT>


            --- Ken Schwaber <ken.schwaber@...> wrote:
            > Bill,
            > Nice; only one change - the team manages the Sprint
            > Backlog to manage
            > themselves. If the ScrumMaster does it for them,
            > then it appears to them
            > that he/she is managing them.
            >
            > Mike,
            > The Sprint Planning meeting is 1 day ... the first
            > 1/2 day is selecting the
            > product backlog to work on for the next Sprint, the
            > second 1/2 day is the
            > team turning that product backlog into sprint
            > backlog.
            > Ken
            >
            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: Bill Wake [mailto:william.wake@...]
            > Sent: Saturday, January 24, 2004 11:46 PM
            > To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: [scrumdevelopment] Scrum on a Page
            >
            >
            > To help me deepen my understanding of Scrum, I've
            > created a one-page
            > summary of development in Scrum. It's at
            > http://xp123.com/xplor/xp0401/index.shtml;
            > I'd welcome your feedback.
            >
            > (And if you want to compare, "XP on a Page" is at
            > http://www.xp123.com/xplor/xp0202/index.shtml)
            >
            > Thanks!
            > Bill Wake William.Wake@... www.xp123.com
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > To Post a message, send it to:
            > scrumdevelopment@...
            > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
            > scrumdevelopment-unsubscribe@...
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            > To visit your group on the web, go to:
            > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/scrumdevelopment/
            >
            > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            > scrumdevelopment-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
            > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
            >
            >


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          • Ron Jeffries
            ... Many sports teams have two captains. They often also have several coaches, a head coach, a manager, and an owner. Many fascinating natural events do not
            Message 5 of 22 , Jan 25, 2004
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              On Sunday, January 25, 2004, at 12:31:25 PM, Chak wrote:

              > One thing that baffles me in the 'Agile process' (with
              > my little knowledge of it), is that it seems to
              > believe in headless teams. To me , a software project
              > is like the voyage of a ship, because it is buffetted
              > by many winds , and one of the 'winds' is that many of
              > the people on the team are with varying levels of
              > experience, and a ship can have only ONE captain, even
              > if it is the Titanic.

              Many sports teams have two captains. They often also have several coaches,
              a head coach, a manager, and an owner.

              Many fascinating natural events do not have a leader at all. The flight of
              birds, the behavior of traffic on a freeway, the food-searching of ants and
              bees, the behavior of bacteria waiting their moment to attack ... all these
              things occur without a leader.

              Maybe the notion of the captain of the ship is too limited. Maybe it is
              even less than optimal. It might even be ... obsolete.

              Ron Jeffries
              www.XProgramming.com
              Bang, bang, Jeffries' silver hammer came down upon their heads ...
            • Nancy Van Schooenderwoert
              On Sun, 2004-01-25 at 12:31, Chak wrote ... In my experience having one person in charge has usually been a mechanism for assignment of blame rather than a
              Message 6 of 22 , Jan 25, 2004
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                On Sun, 2004-01-25 at 12:31, Chak wrote
                > I find that SCRUM and XP seem to delegate planning
                > more and more to the team. This may be fine in an
                > ideal world, but in a software project, which is
                > typically crisis prone, i would rather have ONE
                > captain, who breathes down the neck , and goes down
                > with the ship if necessary...
                >
                > <RANT> Sorry, the expressions of an 'Agile-challenged'
                > person.
                > </RANT>

                In my experience having one person in charge has usually been a
                mechanism for assignment of blame rather than a means to truly achieve
                success. The organization that doesn't believe it can succeed feels
                comfortable knowing just how blame will be apportioned.

                Too often even if there is a genuine push for success of a software
                project, the "captain of the ship" finds that empty positional power is
                a weak substitute for the genuine commitment of each team member, not to
                mention the collection of technical skills necessary. In the old days
                the captain might know how to do every job and need the team only as
                extra hands. Those days are gone. Teamwork is the key to getting complex
                projects done efficiently. Coordination & leadership still happen but
                they needn't reside on one body at all times.
                - njv

                -----------------------------------------------------------------------
                Nancy Van Schooenderwoert XP Embedded Company nancyv@...
                http://www.xp-embedded.com
                -----------------------------------------------------------------------
              • daniel
                To help me deepen my understanding of Scrum, I ve created a one-page summary of development in Scrum. It s at http://xp123.com/xplor/xp0401/index.shtml; I d
                Message 7 of 22 , Jan 25, 2004
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                  To help me deepen my understanding of Scrum, I've created a one-page
                  summary of development in Scrum. It's at
                  http://xp123.com/xplor/xp0401/index.shtml;
                  I'd welcome your feedback.

                  (And if you want to compare, "XP on a Page" is at
                  http://www.xp123.com/xplor/xp0202/index.shtml)

                  Thanks!
                    Bill Wake  William.Wake@...  www.xp123.com





                  To Post a message, send it to:   scrumdevelopment@...
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                • daniel
                  To help me deepen my understanding of Scrum, I ve created a one-page summary of development in Scrum. It s at http://xp123.com/xplor/xp0401/index.shtml; I d
                  Message 8 of 22 , Jan 25, 2004
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                    To help me deepen my understanding of Scrum, I've created a one-page
                    summary of development in Scrum. It's at
                    http://xp123.com/xplor/xp0401/index.shtml;
                    I'd welcome your feedback.

                    (And if you want to compare, "XP on a Page" is at
                    http://www.xp123.com/xplor/xp0202/index.shtml)

                    Thanks!
                      Bill Wake  William.Wake@...  www.xp123.com





                    To Post a message, send it to:   scrumdevelopment@...
                    To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
                    scrumdevelopment-unsubscribe@...



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                  • Bill Wake
                    ... Thanks - and of course - you re welcome to share it. (I put a new notice on it.) ... I made it 1/2-1 day (though I see Ken s reply pushing more for a day).
                    Message 9 of 22 , Jan 25, 2004
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                      --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Cohn" <mike@m...>
                      wrote:
                      > Hi Bill--
                      > I like this. I think I'll print a few out and hang them around
                      > the office, if that's OK with you.

                      Thanks - and of course - you're welcome to share it. (I put a new
                      notice on it.)

                      > The only thing I'd change on your Scrum-on-a-Page is that I
                      > believe the standard advice is to do the Sprint Planning
                      > Meeting in 1/2 day.

                      I made it 1/2-1 day (though I see Ken's reply pushing more for a
                      day). I'll take it as "normal variation":)

                      Thanks,
                      Bill Wake William.Wake@... www.xp123.com
                    • Bill Wake
                      ... Thanks. I ve made that change too. -- Bill Wake William.Wake@acm.org www.xp123.com
                      Message 10 of 22 , Jan 25, 2004
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                        --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, "Ken Schwaber"
                        <ken.schwaber@v...> wrote:
                        > Bill,
                        > Nice; only one change - the team manages the Sprint Backlog
                        > to manage themselves. If the ScrumMaster does it for them,
                        > then it appears to them that he/she is managing them.

                        Thanks. I've made that change too.

                        --
                        Bill Wake William.Wake@... www.xp123.com
                      • Edmund Schweppe
                        ... The notion of the captain of the ship is not at all obsolete ... for a ship. It s not that good a metaphor for a development group, though - after all,
                        Message 11 of 22 , Jan 25, 2004
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                          Ron Jeffries wrote:

                          > On Sunday, January 25, 2004, at 12:31:25 PM, Chak wrote:
                          >>One thing that baffles me in the 'Agile process' (with
                          >>my little knowledge of it), is that it seems to
                          >>believe in headless teams. To me , a software project
                          >>is like the voyage of a ship, because it is buffetted
                          >>by many winds , and one of the 'winds' is that many of
                          >>the people on the team are with varying levels of
                          >>experience, and a ship can have only ONE captain, even
                          >>if it is the Titanic.
                          > Maybe the notion of the captain of the ship is too limited. Maybe it is
                          > even less than optimal. It might even be ... obsolete.

                          The notion of "the captain of the ship" is not at all obsolete ... for a
                          ship. It's not that good a metaphor for a development group, though -
                          after all, ships tend to operate in a rather deadly environments, and
                          one simple mistake can easily kill off the entire crew. I've yet to see
                          that being an issue with a development group. (Not to say that software
                          can't kill people. But it doesn't tend to kill the *developers*, even on
                          "death march" projects.)

                          I wonder how many of the folks who use the "captain of the ship"
                          metaphor have ever actually *served* on a ship ...

                          --
                          Edmund Schweppe -- schweppe@... -- http://schweppe.home.tiac.net
                          The opinions expressed herein are at best coincidentally related to
                          those of any past, present or future employer.
                        • Ron Jeffries
                          ... In fact, the captain of the ship rarely really does anything. The Exec gets things done a bit more. As with everything else in the military, all the real
                          Message 12 of 22 , Jan 25, 2004
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                            On Sunday, January 25, 2004, at 9:55:20 PM, Edmund Schweppe wrote:

                            > The notion of "the captain of the ship" is not at all obsolete ... for a
                            > ship. It's not that good a metaphor for a development group, though -
                            > after all, ships tend to operate in a rather deadly environments, and
                            > one simple mistake can easily kill off the entire crew. I've yet to see
                            > that being an issue with a development group. (Not to say that software
                            > can't kill people. But it doesn't tend to kill the *developers*, even on
                            > "death march" projects.)

                            > I wonder how many of the folks who use the "captain of the ship"
                            > metaphor have ever actually *served* on a ship ...

                            In fact, the captain of the ship rarely really does anything. The Exec gets
                            things done a bit more. As with everything else in the military, all the
                            real stuff gets done by immediate decisions "in the trenches". If you want
                            something done in the Army, find a guy with lots of stripes on his sleeve,
                            not someone with stars on his shoulder.

                            Ron Jeffries
                            www.XProgramming.com
                            Logic is overrated as a system of thought.
                          • Mike Cohn
                            True! True! Continuing with the captain of the ship idea I have to recommend the book It s Your Ship by Captain D. Michael Abrashoff. (See it here:
                            Message 13 of 22 , Jan 25, 2004
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                              True! True!
                              Continuing with the "captain of the ship" idea I have to recommend the book
                              "It's Your Ship" by Captain D. Michael Abrashoff. (See it here:
                              http://tinyurl.com/yttvu.)

                              The author/captain tells about his experiences completely turning around a
                              ship. His approach was entirely capable with agile software development. One
                              of his key points (made clear by the title) was that decision-making got
                              pushed down well below the captain level.

                              --Mike

                              -----Original Message-----
                              From: Ron Jeffries [mailto:ronjeffries@...]
                              Sent: Sunday, January 25, 2004 8:08 PM
                              To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Scrum on a Page

                              On Sunday, January 25, 2004, at 9:55:20 PM, Edmund Schweppe wrote:

                              > The notion of "the captain of the ship" is not at all obsolete ... for a
                              > ship. It's not that good a metaphor for a development group, though -
                              > after all, ships tend to operate in a rather deadly environments, and
                              > one simple mistake can easily kill off the entire crew. I've yet to see
                              > that being an issue with a development group. (Not to say that software
                              > can't kill people. But it doesn't tend to kill the *developers*, even on
                              > "death march" projects.)

                              > I wonder how many of the folks who use the "captain of the ship"
                              > metaphor have ever actually *served* on a ship ...

                              In fact, the captain of the ship rarely really does anything. The Exec gets
                              things done a bit more. As with everything else in the military, all the
                              real stuff gets done by immediate decisions "in the trenches". If you want
                              something done in the Army, find a guy with lots of stripes on his sleeve,
                              not someone with stars on his shoulder.

                              Ron Jeffries
                              www.XProgramming.com
                              Logic is overrated as a system of thought.


                              To Post a message, send it to: scrumdevelopment@...
                              To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
                              scrumdevelopment-unsubscribe@...

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                            • Ron Jeffries
                              ... Ordered. Thanks! Ron Jeffries www.XProgramming.com Questioner: How do I sell my executive team on doing this stuff? Jim Highsmith: Don t. Just do it. They
                              Message 14 of 22 , Jan 25, 2004
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                                On Sunday, January 25, 2004, at 10:21:30 PM, Mike Cohn wrote:

                                > Continuing with the "captain of the ship" idea I have to recommend the book
                                > "It's Your Ship" by Captain D. Michael Abrashoff. (See it here:
                                > http://tinyurl.com/yttvu.)

                                > The author/captain tells about his experiences completely turning around a
                                > ship. His approach was entirely capable with agile software development. One
                                > of his key points (made clear by the title) was that decision-making got
                                > pushed down well below the captain level.

                                Ordered. Thanks!

                                Ron Jeffries
                                www.XProgramming.com
                                Questioner: How do I sell my executive team on doing this stuff?
                                Jim Highsmith: Don't. Just do it. They don't know what you're doing anyway.
                              • John Redfield
                                Yes and no, no and yes.. My understanding thus far of Agile is it is able to morph, bend and sprout appendiges or lose them as required by the conditions
                                Message 15 of 22 , Jan 25, 2004
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                                  Yes and no, no and yes……

                                   

                                  My understanding thus far of Agile is it is able to morph, bend and sprout appendiges or lose them as required by the conditions arising, unlike the non flexible “traditional structure”. Am I on track here?

                                   

                                  It seems we can get lost in allegorical trivia, plotting an opinion as if project conditions were actually static? Bill’s idea to map out the general philosophy is a good communication tool, and aptly expresses the Agile recipe. The captain could be a team member on any given day or moment, ScrumMaster the next, or the whole when everyone is in the “zone’. Does it matter? Will it be constant, or a repeatable function for the next project? I doubt both.

                                   

                                  Captain, Scrummaster, Team, Agile… do we benefit from delineating a fixed idea about what these are?

                                   

                                  J

                                   

                                  John Redfield

                                   


                                  From: Ron Jeffries [mailto:ronjeffries@...]
                                  Sent: Sunday, January 25, 2004 10:08 PM
                                  To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                                  Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Scrum on a Page

                                   

                                  On Sunday, January 25, 2004, at 9:55:20 PM, Edmund Schweppe wrote:

                                  > The notion of "the captain of the ship" is not at all obsolete ... for a
                                  > ship. It's not that good a metaphor for a development group, though -
                                  > after all, ships tend to operate in a rather deadly environments, and
                                  > one simple mistake can easily kill off the entire crew. I've yet to see
                                  > that being an issue with a development group. (Not to say that software
                                  > can't kill people. But it doesn't tend to kill the *developers*, even on
                                  > "death march" projects.)

                                  > I wonder how many of the folks who use the "captain of the ship"
                                  > metaphor have ever actually *served* on a ship ...

                                  In fact, the captain of the ship rarely really does anything. The Exec gets
                                  things done a bit more. As with everything else in the military, all the
                                  real stuff gets done by immediate decisions "in the trenches". If you want
                                  something done in the Army, find a guy with lots of stripes on his sleeve,
                                  not someone with stars on his shoulder.

                                  Ron Jeffries
                                  www.XProgramming.com
                                  Logic is overrated as a system of thought.



                                  To Post a message, send it to:   scrumdevelopment@...
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                                • John Redfield
                                  I concur Mike. We just read this book (required) at my company. I didn t think of it until you drew the comparison, but it is very much in agreement with
                                  Message 16 of 22 , Jan 25, 2004
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                                    I concur Mike.

                                     

                                    We just read this book (required) at my company. I didn’t think of it until you drew the comparison, but it is very much in agreement with AGILE.

                                     

                                    JR

                                     


                                    From: Mike Cohn [mailto:mike@...]
                                    Sent: Sunday, January 25, 2004 10:22 PM
                                    To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                                    Subject: RE: [scrumdevelopment] Scrum on a Page

                                     

                                    True! True!
                                    Continuing with the "captain of the ship" idea I have to recommend the book
                                    "It's Your Ship" by Captain D. Michael Abrashoff. (See it here:
                                    http://tinyurl.com/yttvu.)

                                    The author/captain tells about his experiences completely turning around a
                                    ship. His approach was entirely capable with agile software development. One
                                    of his key points (made clear by the title) was that decision-making got
                                    pushed down well below the captain level.

                                    --Mike

                                    -----Original Message-----
                                    From: Ron Jeffries [mailto:ronjeffries@...]
                                    Sent: Sunday, January 25, 2004 8:08 PM
                                    To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                                    Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Scrum on a Page

                                    On Sunday, January 25, 2004, at 9:55:20 PM, Edmund Schweppe wrote:

                                    > The notion of "the captain of the ship" is not at all obsolete ... for a
                                    > ship. It's not that good a metaphor for a development group, though -
                                    > after all, ships tend to operate in a rather deadly environments, and
                                    > one simple mistake can easily kill off the entire crew. I've yet to see
                                    > that being an issue with a development group. (Not to say that software
                                    > can't kill people. But it doesn't tend to kill the *developers*, even on
                                    > "death march" projects.)

                                    > I wonder how many of the folks who use the "captain of the ship"
                                    > metaphor have ever actually *served* on a ship ...

                                    In fact, the captain of the ship rarely really does anything. The Exec gets
                                    things done a bit more. As with everything else in the military, all the
                                    real stuff gets done by immediate decisions "in the trenches". If you want
                                    something done in the Army, find a guy with lots of stripes on his sleeve,
                                    not someone with stars on his shoulder.

                                    Ron Jeffries
                                    www.XProgramming.com
                                    Logic is overrated as a system of thought.


                                    To Post a message, send it to:   scrumdevelopment@...
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                                    scrumdevelopment-unsubscribe@...

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                                  • Stan Rifkin
                                    Here is a comment about It s your ship ... from a career naval officer who now works for us: I havent come across this book, Stan. I am a member of the Naval
                                    Message 17 of 22 , Jan 26, 2004
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                                      Here is a comment about "It's your ship ..." from a career naval officer who now works for us:

                                      I haven’t come across this book, Stan.  I am a member of the Naval Institute and the Naval Institute Press normally publishes books like this.  I’m surprised that this book was published by a business publishing house.  Captain Abrashoff is probably sowing the fields for his next career. 

                                      Not that it is bad to do that, only that I would think he might be looking to show that management and leadership for his ship is much the same as management and leadership of a large business organization.  This is a notion that has been suggested over and over before, but I think it is fundamentally flawed because a Navy ship has no profit motive to deal with and a business has no “mission” involving the total destruction and death of an enemy effected through complete obedience of the crew to commands of superiors (well, there is Microsoft). 

                                      All ships, Navy or commercial, would be perfect examples of organizations that need operational excellence more than anything else.  While I was in Navy ships and actively leading a division or department, there were many influential officers who authored books and articles about how to effectively “fight” the ship, the ultimate objective of a Navy ship, and satisfy the ship’s various mission areas (ASW, AAW, ASUW, land attack, force projection, etc.).  There were always sections on how to create an excellent team for propulsion, ship handling, weaponry, tactical communications, underway replenishment, navigation, and damage control.  Since Admiral Elmo Zumwalt became the CNO in 1970, there has been increasing emphasis on personnel management and leadership excellence, but it is always in the context of managing and leading a “captive” audience, as we used to say.  No one can get fed up and quit on the spot, so much of the advice includes the concept that folks will get over petty grievances in time and see the big picture.  In business orgs, attrition would become unacceptable if the Navy way was implemented in the fashion as I used to know it.


                                    • Alleman, Glen B.
                                      Chak, Our experiences with XP teams does not turn out this way. We have only two specific external reporting role: (1) Scorekeeper who must report the
                                      Message 18 of 22 , Jan 26, 2004
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                                        Chak,

                                        Our experiences with XP teams does not turn out this way. We have only
                                        two specific "external" reporting role:

                                        (1) Scorekeeper who must report the financial aspects of the team to
                                        management.
                                        (2) Spokesperson who must be able to give a standup talk about the teams
                                        progress to management.

                                        Multiple and changing leadership roles are common. We used to be a
                                        "command and control" shop were a single pre-designated leader was
                                        assigned to the team. Now the team is formed (sometimes with much
                                        turmoil) and the team defines the leadership role. In John Kotter's
                                        terms these are self-directed teams.

                                        Such teams are not without problems, but the problems are solved with
                                        everyone having a smile on their face.

                                        Glen B. Alleman
                                        CH2M HILL
                                        Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site
                                        glen.alleman@...
                                        glen.alleman@...
                                        >-----Original Message-----
                                        >From: Chak

                                        [GBA] snip
                                        >
                                        >One thing that baffles me in the 'Agile process' (with
                                        >my little knowledge of it), is that it seems to
                                        >believe in headless teams. To me , a software project
                                        >is like the voyage of a ship, because it is buffetted
                                        >by many winds , and one of the 'winds' is that many of
                                        >the people on the team are with varying levels of
                                        >experience, and a ship can have only ONE captain, even
                                        >if it is the Titanic.
                                        >
                                        >I find that SCRUM and XP seem to delegate planning
                                        >more and more to the team. This may be fine in an
                                        >ideal world, but in a software project, which is
                                        >typically crisis prone, i would rather have ONE
                                        >captain, who breathes down the neck , and goes down
                                        >with the ship if necessary...
                                        >
                                        ><RANT> Sorry, the expressions of an 'Agile-challenged'
                                        >person.
                                        ></RANT>
                                      • Tiseo, Paul
                                        Some comments/questions: A) Isn t any capitalist business, in part, out to destroy any competitor? Isn t it an issue of physical and corporeal destruction
                                        Message 19 of 22 , Jan 26, 2004
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                                          Some comments/questions:

                                           

                                          A) Isn’t any capitalist business, in part, out to “destroy” any competitor? Isn’t it an issue of physical and corporeal destruction versus financial destruction?

                                           

                                          B) One can “lead through fear” (a.k.a. command-and-control) or lead through empowerment (a.k.a. something like Scrum) in either war or software development. The fact that lives are at stake might push more military structure towards CandC, perhaps with good reason.

                                           

                                          C) What business doesn’t need “operational excellence” first and foremost? What are other things a business might need more than “operational excellence”?

                                           

                                          Not intending to be antagonistic. I find this discussion interesting…

                                           

                                          _________________________________

                                          Paul Tiseo, Systems Programmer

                                          Research Computing Facility

                                          Mayo Clinic Jacksonville , Griffin 371

                                          tiseo.paul@...

                                            

                                           


                                          From: Stan Rifkin [mailto:sr@...]
                                          Sent: Monday, January 26, 2004 10:20 AM
                                          To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                                          Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Scrum on a Page (really "Its; your ship ...")

                                           

                                          Here is a comment about "It's your ship ..." from a career naval officer who now works for us:

                                          I haven’t come across this book, Stan.  I am a member of the Naval Institute and the Naval Institute Press normally publishes books like this.  I’m surprised that this book was published by a business publishing house.  Captain Abrashoff is probably sowing the fields for his next career. 

                                          Not that it is bad to do that, only that I would think he might be looking to show that management and leadership for his ship is much the same as management and leadership of a large business organization.  This is a notion that has been suggested over and over before, but I think it is fundamentally flawed because a Navy ship has no profit motive to deal with and a business has no “mission” involving the total destruction and death of an enemy effected through complete obedience of the crew to commands of superiors (well, there is Microsoft). 

                                          All ships, Navy or commercial, would be perfect examples of organizations that need operational excellence more than anything else.  While I was in Navy ships and actively leading a division or department, there were many influential officers who authored books and articles about how to effectively “fight” the ship, the ultimate objective of a Navy ship, and satisfy the ship’s various mission areas (ASW, AAW, ASUW, land attack, force projection, etc.).  There were always sections on how to create an excellent team for propulsion, ship handling, weaponry, tactical communications, underway replenishment, navigation, and damage control.  Since Admiral Elmo Zumwalt became the CNO in 1970, there has been increasing emphasis on personnel management and leadership excellence, but it is always in the context of managing and leading a “captive” audience, as we used to say.  No one can get fed up and quit on the spot, so much of the advice includes the concept that folks will get over petty grievances in time and see the big picture.  In business orgs, attrition would become unacceptable if the Navy way was implemented in the fashion as I used to know it.




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                                        • Steven Gordon
                                          A business might need a market more than it needs operational excellence . ... From: Tiseo, Paul [mailto:tiseo.paul@mayo.edu] Sent: Mon 1/26/2004 8:59 AM To:
                                          Message 20 of 22 , Jan 26, 2004
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                                            A business might need a market more than it needs "operational excellence".

                                            -----Original Message-----
                                            From: Tiseo, Paul [mailto:tiseo.paul@...]
                                            Sent: Mon 1/26/2004 8:59 AM
                                            To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                                            Cc:
                                            Subject: RE: [scrumdevelopment] Scrum on a Page (really "Its; your ship ...")



                                            Some comments/questions:



                                            A) Isn’t any capitalist business, in part, out to “destroy” any competitor? Isn’t it an issue of physical and corporeal destruction versus financial destruction?



                                            B) One can “lead through fear” (a.k.a. command-and-control) or lead through empowerment (a.k.a. something like Scrum) in either war or software development. The fact that lives are at stake might push more military structure towards CandC, perhaps with good reason.



                                            C) What business doesn’t need “operational excellence” first and foremost? What are other things a business might need more than “operational excellence”?



                                            Not intending to be antagonistic. I find this discussion interesting…



                                            _________________________________

                                            Paul Tiseo, Systems Programmer

                                            Research Computing Facility

                                            Mayo Clinic Jacksonville, Griffin 371

                                            tiseo.paul@...






                                            _____


                                            From: Stan Rifkin [mailto:sr@...]
                                            Sent: Monday, January 26, 2004 10:20 AM
                                            To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                                            Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Scrum on a Page (really "Its; your ship ...")



                                            Here is a comment about "It's your ship ..." from a career naval officer who now works for us:

                                            I haven’t come across this book, Stan. I am a member of the Naval Institute and the Naval Institute Press normally publishes books like this. I’m surprised that this book was published by a business publishing house. Captain Abrashoff is probably sowing the fields for his next career.

                                            Not that it is bad to do that, only that I would think he might be looking to show that management and leadership for his ship is much the same as management and leadership of a large business organization. This is a notion that has been suggested over and over before, but I think it is fundamentally flawed because a Navy ship has no profit motive to deal with and a business has no “mission” involving the total destruction and death of an enemy effected through complete obedience of the crew to commands of superiors (well, there is Microsoft).

                                            All ships, Navy or commercial, would be perfect examples of organizations that need operational excellence more than anything else. While I was in Navy ships and actively leading a division or department, there were many influential officers who authored books and articles about how to effectively “fight” the ship, the ultimate objective of a Navy ship, and satisfy the ship’s various mission areas (ASW, AAW, ASUW, land attack, force projection, etc.). There were always sections on how to create an excellent team for propulsion, ship handling, weaponry, tactical communications, underway replenishment, navigation, and damage control. Since Admiral Elmo Zumwalt became the CNO in 1970, there has been increasing emphasis on personnel management and leadership excellence, but it is always in the context of managing and leading a “captive” audience, as we used to say. No one can get fed up and quit on the spot, so much of the advice includes the concept that folks will get over petty grievances in time and see the big picture. In business orgs, attrition would become unacceptable if the Navy way was implemented in the fashion as I used to know it.




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                                          • Stan Rifkin
                                            Pl ease see my intersticed notes below. - Stan Tiseo, Paul wrote: Some comments/questions: A) Isnt any capitalist business, in part, out to destroy any
                                            Message 21 of 22 , Jan 26, 2004
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                                              Please see my intersticed notes below. - Stan

                                              Tiseo, Paul wrote:

                                              Some comments/questions:

                                               

                                              A) Isn’t any capitalist business, in part, out to “destroy” any competitor? Isn’t it an issue of physical and corporeal destruction versus financial destruction?

                                              No, some enterprises exist to help, not to destroy. Say, the Mayo Clinic!

                                               

                                              B) One can “lead through fear” (a.k.a. command-and-control) or lead through empowerment (a.k.a. something like Scrum) in either war or software development. The fact that lives are at stake might push more military structure towards CandC, perhaps with good reason.

                                              Empowerment, as you note, means giving up power. In emergency situations we often need to coordinate large groups of people quickly, so we cannot afford too much thinking (= the power to take independent action) at the leaves of the organization. This is one of the strengths of bureaucracy. Pretty anti-agile.

                                               

                                              C) What business doesn’t need “operational excellence” first and foremost? What are other things a business might need more than “operational excellence”?

                                              While all organizations need some operational excellence, only a few need to focus on it. Operational excellence is one of three strategies identified in The discipline of market leaders. Operationally excellent organizations focus on high quality as the way to reduce costs and therefore price. They have short menus of products or services and a formula for their delivery. They are process-centric. Think of MacDonald's, Wal-Mart, FedEx. They are the intended audience for the SEI CMM/CMMI. They are the opposite of agile. That is Dick's point.

                                               

                                              Not intending to be antagonistic. I find this discussion interesting…

                                               

                                              _________________________________

                                              Paul Tiseo, Systems Programmer

                                              Research Computing Facility

                                              Mayo Clinic Jacksonville , Griffin 371

                                              tiseo.paul@...

                                                

                                               


                                              From: Stan Rifkin [mailto:sr@...]
                                              Sent: Monday, January 26, 2004 10:20 AM
                                              To: scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com
                                              Subject: Re: [scrumdevelopment] Scrum on a Page (really "Its; your ship ...")

                                               

                                              Here is a comment about "It's your ship ..." from a career naval officer who now works for us:

                                              I haven’t come across this book, Stan.  I am a member of the Naval Institute and the Naval Institute Press normally publishes books like this.  I’m surprised that this book was published by a business publishing house.  Captain Abrashoff is probably sowing the fields for his next career. 

                                              Not that it is bad to do that, only that I would think he might be looking to show that management and leadership for his ship is much the same as management and leadership of a large business organization.  This is a notion that has been suggested over and over before, but I think it is fundamentally flawed because a Navy ship has no profit motive to deal with and a business has no “mission” involving the total destruction and death of an enemy effected through complete obedience of the crew to commands of superiors (well, there is Microsoft). 

                                              All ships, Navy or commercial, would be perfect examples of organizations that need operational excellence more than anything else.  While I was in Navy ships and actively leading a division or department, there were many influential officers who authored books and articles about how to effectively “fight” the ship, the ultimate objective of a Navy ship, and satisfy the ship’s various mission areas (ASW, AAW, ASUW, land attack, force projection, etc.).  There were always sections on how to create an excellent team for propulsion, ship handling, weaponry, tactical communications, underway replenishment, navigation, and damage control.  Since Admiral Elmo Zumwalt became the CNO in 1970, there has been increasing emphasis on personnel management and leadership excellence, but it is always in the context of managing and leading a “captive” audience, as we used to say.  No one can get fed up and quit on the spot, so much of the advice includes the concept that folks will get over petty grievances in time and see the big picture.  In business orgs, attrition would become unacceptable if the Navy way was implemented in the fashion as I used to know it.

                                              [...]

                                            • Simon Coles
                                              ... Some might place more emphasis on product development or marketing. In my personal experience, I ve come across more than one consumer goods manufacturer
                                              Message 22 of 22 , Jan 26, 2004
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                                                > C) What business doesn't need "operational excellence" first and foremost?
                                                > What are other things a business might need more than "operational
                                                > excellence"?

                                                Some might place more emphasis on product development or marketing. In my
                                                personal experience, I've come across more than one consumer goods
                                                manufacturer that appears to rate both of these higher than operational
                                                excellence!

                                                As for "operational excellence" itself, different organisations will define
                                                this in different ways. Operational objectives can be categorised against 5
                                                different dimensions (see 'Operations Management', Slack et al, ISBN
                                                0273679066):

                                                - Cost. Generally of interest to everyone, and distinct from price.

                                                - Speed. Think of a breakdown service, where time to reach a call is a
                                                key measure.

                                                - Quality. Can mean very different things in different sectors.

                                                - Dependability. Keeping promises.

                                                - Flexibility. The 'agility' we talk about obsessively on this list!
                                                Comes in different flavours:
                                                - volume (scaling up/down quickly)
                                                - mix (offering a wide range of products/services)
                                                - product/service (ability to introduce new
                                                products/services)
                                                - delivery (flexible about when things are delivered)

                                                I suspect a warship places a lot more emphasis on dependability, say, then
                                                the postal service (turning up for battle a day late having rather more
                                                severe consequences than delivering a letter a day late).

                                                I would categorise agile development as follows:

                                                - Cost: No
                                                SCRUM, XP, etc never set-out specifically to make software development
                                                cheaper.
                                                We might choose to claim lower costs through high quality (less rework,
                                                refactoring) and speed (less chance
                                                of requirements going 'stale'), but Cost is still not a principal
                                                objective.

                                                - Speed: Yes
                                                Heavy emphasis on frequent releases, and within SPRINTs/increments, lots
                                                of emphasis on rapid feedback.

                                                - Quality: Yes
                                                Particularly in XP, lots of disciplines to ensure high quality. SCRUM
                                                also preaches good development practices, but
                                                does not prescribe one particular set.

                                                - Dependability: No
                                                We might be tempted to say yes because of time-boxing, but whilst we peg
                                                dates, we don't promise up
                                                front exactly what will ship. The eventual end-date of a project against
                                                a fixed set of requirements
                                                is as uncertain as when using non-agile approaches.

                                                - Flexibility: Yes
                                                Agile development evolved specifically to address environments where
                                                business needs change rapidly.


                                                Cheers,
                                                Simon
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