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Re: Is it a right way to Estimate the Velocity?

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  • Deusdit Correa Cornejo
    Thank you Don for your comments, I know that maybe this is no the best way to estimate the Velocity but I m a beliver that once we starts with the Sprints we
    Message 1 of 14 , Aug 29, 2007
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      Thank you Don for your comments, I know that maybe this is no the
      best way to estimate the Velocity but I'm a beliver that once we
      starts with the Sprints we will refine our mechanism to
      estimate/calculate it.

      Thanks to other too, becuase their comments (some of them with more
      sarcarsm than others) help us to have a better understanding on
      Velocity.

      Regards,

      Deus.

      --- In scrumdevelopment@yahoogroups.com, Don Gray <don@...> wrote:
      >
      > Bas,
      >
      > > It's important to remember that the more complicated you make the
      > > calculation, the more if will give you the illusion of reality.
      >
      > Most people find it easy to confuse precision with accuracy.
      > Guessing values and then computing the answer to 2 decimal places
      > leads to highly precise, but usually inaccurate answers.
      >
      > > So, if you want to get the feeling of a more reliable way, I'd
      recommend
      > > thinking of more factors to include in the formula.
      >
      > <grin>
      >
      > Over the years, I've decided what we look for is comfort. We have
      > different ways to get to comfort. Having a precise number works
      for
      > some. I find comfort offering a range. I recently told a potential
      > client the effort was bigger than a bread box but smaller than a
      > semi-tractor-trailer. After some research, I refined the number to
      > "value +/- 20%". To be more accurate, I'd have to actually do the
      > work.
      >
      > Deusdit seems comfortable with the equation. It doesn't work for
      me,
      > and that's OK. I'd expect variation in behavior and effort as the
      > team starts the first sprint to the point of overwhelming the
      > calculation. But we have to start somewhere.
      >
      > I'm reminded of the saying that goes something like:
      > "Measure to the millimeter, mark with a crayon, cut with an axe."
      >
      > --
      > Don (336)374-7591
      >
      > Things do not change; we change.
      > Henry David Thoreau
      >
      > Improve your changing at the AYE Conference Nov 4 - 7, 2007
      > www.AYEconference.com
      >
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